program data – Albright College

Arts at Albright

photo of dancers

Take advantage of Albright’s digital CADD technology, recording and artistic studios, and showcase your work through the college’s art galleries, record label, radio station, or as a member of a variety of musical, dance or theatrical groups.


Programs

Art
Arts Administration
Art History
Costume Design
Design & Merchandising
Digital Media
Digital Studio Art
English-Theatre
Entertainment Industry
Fashion Design
Fashion Merchandising
Film & Video
Music
Music Business
Music Industry Studies
Photography
Theatre


Program Requirements

Art and Art History


The Art Department offers a curriculum that combines theory and practice, well in keeping with Albright’s emphases on the liberal arts and experiential learning. This curriculum, which comprises both studio and lecture courses, has two aims:

  • To education students who elect the Art major, combined major or minor options required for a professional degree
  • To heighten the awareness and appreciation of the visual arts through expansion of your knowledge of art forms and artists, and their relation to society

Studio Art Major

    • ART 101 Drawing
    • ART 103 Design
    • ART 112 Painting I
    • ART 113 Sculpture I
    • ART 114 Printmaking
    • Two Art History courses
    • Two courses from among the following:
      • ART 102 Life Drawing
      • ART 216 Photography
      • ART 265 Computer Graphics
    • Concentration in either:
      • Painting (ART 212, 312 and 412)

OR

    • Sculpture (ART 213, 313 and 413)
    • ART 400 Advanced Studio Topics**

*One of these courses may also be used to satisfy the Foundations-Fine Arts requirement of the General Education Curriculum.
**Must be the same area as 200-level course


Combined Major in Studio Art

 

  • ART 101 Drawing
  • ART 103 Design
  • One of the following:
    • ART 105 Art History I
    • ART 106 Art History II
    • ART 200+ Art History
  • ART 112 Painting I
  • ART 113 Sculpture I
  • ART 212 Painting II or ART 213 Sculpture II
  • ART 400 Advanced Studio Topics

*One of these courses may also be used to satisfy the Foundations-Fine Arts requirement of the General Education Curriculum.


Digital Studio Art

  • ART 101 Drawing
  • ART 103 Design
  • ART 113 Sculpture I
  • ART 216 Photography I or ART 112 Painting I
  • ART 256 Modern Art and Design Concepts
  • ART 265 Computer Graphics
  • ART 400 Studio Topics (Painting, Sculpture or Digital Studio)
  • DIG 265 Digital Literacy
  • SYN 352 Aesthetic Rebels in Film and Art (formerly IDS252)
  • Three courses from:
    • DIG 201 Digital Video
    • DIG 270 Digital Illustration and Design
    • DIG 315 Web Design or DIG 325 Visual Design for the Web
    • ART 212 Painting II or ART 213 Sculpture II
  • DIG 420 Senior Seminar

One of the ART courses may also be used to satisfy the Foundations-Fine Arts requirement of the General Education Curriculum.


Minors

Minor in Art History

  • Two 100-level Art History courses
  • Two 200-level Art History courses
  • One 300-level Art History research course

Minor in Film/Video

  • One 100-level Art History course
  • One introductory studio course
  • DIG 201 Digital Video I and DIG 301 Digital Video II
  • One 400-level studio topics course

Minor in Photography

  • One Art History course
  • One introductory studio course
  • ART 216 and 316 (Photography I and II)
  • One 400-level studio topics course

Minor in Painting

  • One 100 level Art History Course
  • Design (ART 103)
  • Painting I (ART 112)
  • Painting II ( ART 212)
  • Studio Topics-Painting (ART 400)

Minor in Sculpture

  • One 100 level Art History Course
  • Design (ART 103)
  • Sculpture I (ART 113)
  • Sculpture II ( ART 213)
  • Studio Topics-Sculpture (ART 400)

Art Education Certification

Art Majors preparing for a career in education take Art courses and a series of Education and other courses specified by the Education Department to meet Pennsylvania Department of Education regulations. As early as possible in their college experience, candidates for teacher certification in Art should consult the Requirements section of the Education website and the chair of Education regarding specific course requirements. The Art Education certification is a grades K-12 program.

Art History


Specific course requirements are listed in the Art Department section. Contact: Chair, Art Department

Arts Administration


The Arts Administration Co-Major and Minor

Both the co-major and minor options offer flexibility in your course of study, allowing you to tailor the program to your interests, whether it’s visual arts or performing arts, and, within performing arts, theatre or music. If you’re interested in business, you can choose marketing, finance, leadership/management or legal concepts. Co-majors in history, education, science, digital media or even fashion can benefit from an arts administration co-major, especially if you want to pursue a career in museums, historic parks/sites/homes, science centers, symphonies, ballets, public radio/TV or any other non-profit cultural organization.

Minor in Arts Administration
Requirements:

  • ARA 220 – Introduction to Arts Administration
  • Production/Practice Course (choose one from the corresponding list below)
  • History/Theory Course (choose one from the corresponding list below)
  • Business Course (choose one of the following, see course titles below)
    • ACC 101
    • BUS 250, 346, 347 (ECO 105 prerequisite)
    • MAT 110
    • ECO 207
  • ARA 282 or 382 – Internship in Arts Administration

Co-Major in Arts Administration
Requirements:

  • ARA 220 – Introduction to Arts Administration
  • ARA 390 – Project Management or ARA 270 – Exhibition Development/Gallery Management (choose one)
  • ARA 382 – Internship in Arts Administration
  • ARA 490 – Senior Seminar in Arts Administration
  • ACC 101 – Financial Accounting (for Business co-majors the sub is BUS 250 – Business Law I)
  • Elective 1 – Production/Practice Course (choose one from the corresponding list below)
  • Elective 2 – History/Theory Course (choose one from the corresponding list below)

Arts Administration Courses

  • ARA 220 – Introduction to Arts Administration (required for minor and co-major)
  • ARA 282 or 382 – Internship in Arts Administration (required for minor and co-major)
  • ARA 490 – Senior Seminar in arts Administration (required for co-major only)
  • ARA 270 – Gallery Management (co-majors must take this course or 390)
  • ARA 390 – Project Management (co-majors must take this course or 270)

Business and Business-Related Courses

  • ACC 101 – Financial Accounting (required for co-major; for Business co-majors the sub BUS 250)
  • BUS 250 – Business Law I
  • BUS 346 – Management Principles
  • BUS 347 – Marketing Management (ECO 105 – Principles of Economics is a prerequisite)
  • ECO 105 – Principles of Economics
  • ECO 207 – Statistical Analysis
  • MAT 110 – Elementary Statistics

Production/Practice Courses (one of the following is required for minor and co-major)

  • ART 101 – Drawing
  • ART 103 – Design I
  • ART 112 – Painting I
  • ART 113 – Sculpture I
  • ART 114 – Printmaking I
  • ART 212 – Painting II – prerequisite: Art 112 or permission of department
  • ART 213 – Sculpture II – Prerequisite: Art 113 or permission of department
  • ART 216 – Photography
  • ART 265 – Computer Graphics Art & Design
  • ARA 270 – Gallery Management
  • FAS105 Visual literacy
  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals
  • FAS200 Textiles
  • THR 150 – Acting Studio I
  • THR 210 – Design Fundamentals
  • THR 211 – Stagecraft
  • THR 212 – Stage Electrics
  • THR 213 – Audio Engineering
  • THR 250 – Acting
  • THR 255 – Improvisational Theatre
  • THR 311 – Scenography (THR 210 – Design Fundamentals is a prerequisite)
  • THR 312 – Designing with Light (THR 210 – Design Fundamentals is a prerequisite)
  • THR 350 – Directing Studio (THR 150 – Acting Studio I is a prerequisite)
  • MUS 103A – Symphonic Band
  • MUS 103B – Chamber Ensembles
  • MUS 104 – String Chamber Orchestra
  • MUS 105A – Concert Choir
  • MUS 105B – Women’s Chorale
  • MUS 109 – Applied Music Lessons
  • MUS 342 – From Demo to Distribution

History/Theory Courses (one of the following is required for minor and co-major)

  • ART 104 – Survey of Art History
  • ART 105 – Art History I: Ancient through Medieval
  • ART 106 – Art History II: The Renaissance to Early 19th Century
  • ART 107 – Art History III: Survey of Modern Art
  • ART 253 – Art of the Renaissance
  • ART 254 – The Italian and Northern Baroque
  • ART 255 – Art of the 18th and 19th Centuries
  • ART 256 – Modern Art and Design Concepts in the 20th Century
  • FAS203 Fashion History I (Prehistoric to 18th Century)
  • FAS204 Fashion History II (19th to 21 Century)
  • THR 287 – American Musical Theatre
  • THR 288 – Great Ages of Theatre I
  • THR 289 – Great Ages of Theatre II
  • THR 388 – Postmodern American Drama
  • THR 389 – Postmodern British and European Drama
  • ENG 354 – Shakespeare
  • MUS 113 – Rags, Rock and Rap: Popular Music and American Culture
  • MUS 120 – Music Appreciation: Introduction to Western Music
  • MUS 122 – Music in World Cultures: An Introduction
  • MUS 125 – All That Jazz
  • MUS 287 – American Musical Theatre

Business, Accounting & Economics


Business Administration

Business studies at Albright are a blend of theory and application. You’ll receive hands-on experience through internships, simulations, field trips and case studies. The business administration major offers a comprehensive program that aptly combines in- and out-of-class learning.

Unlike at many other schools, you’ll start with business coursework in your freshman year, and during the course of your education will take classes in accounting, economics, statistics, finance, management, marketing, management information systems, business-government-society and business strategy. You’ll select from one of five specializations, with co-majors available through the use of electives.

Requirements:

  • ECO 105 Principles of Economics (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Social Science requirement)
  • ECO 207 Statistics (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Quantitative requirement)
  • A core requirement of these courses:
    • ACC 101 Financial Accounting
    • BUS 246 Management Principles
    • BUS 247 Marketing Management
    • BUS 250 Business Law I
    • BUS 310 Operations Management
    • BUS 345 Financial Management
    • BUS 366 Management of Information
    • BUS 380 Business, Government & Society
    • BUS 460 Strategies & Policies
  • One additional Economics course above the 100-level
  • In addition, students must complete four courses in one of the following tracks: Economics, Entertainment Industry, Finance, International Business, Management, Marketing or Sport Management.
    • Economics
      • ECO 307 Econometrics
      • ECO 335 Intermediate Microeconomics
      • ECO 336 Intermediate Macroeconomics
      • ECO 492 Seminar in Economics
      • *Your Choice from BAE GLOBAL LIST
    • Finance
      • BUS 350 Investments
      • BUS 495 Seminar in Finance
      • ECO 301 International Economics
      • ECO 307 Econometrics
      • ECO 313 Money & Banking
      • Note: Students interested in careers involving serious financial analysis are strongly encouraged to complete the interdisciplinary major in Accounting, Economics and Finance.
    • Entertainment Industry
      • BUS 310 Operations Management or ACC 220 Managerial Accounting
      • MUS 244 Music Marketing
      • MUS 344 Artist Management
      • MUS 345 Music Law
      • MUS 391 Concert Promotion
    • International Business
      • BUS 310 Operations Management
      • BUS 368 International Management
      • BUS 374 International Marketing
      • BUS 498 Seminar in International Business
      • ECO 233 Comparative Economics or ECO 301 International Economics
    • Management
      • BUS 310 Operations Management
      • BUS 365 Entrepreneurship
      • BUS 368 International Management
      • BUS 496 Seminar in Management
      • BUS 354 Sport Management or BUS 363 Human Resource Management or ACC 220 Managerial Accounting
    • Marketing
      • BUS 310 Operations Management
      • BUS 370 Marketing Strategies and Policies
      • BUS 372 Marketing Research
      • BUS 497 Seminar in Marketing
      • BUS 374 International Marketing or BUS 376 Retailing or BUS 378 Selling
    • Sport Management
      • BUS 310 Operations Management or ACC 220 Managerial Accounting
      • BUS 354 Sport Management
      • BUS 357 Sport Marketing
      • BUS 358 Sports Law or BUS 382 Internship (must be at 300 level and include a sport
        component)
      • BUS 494 Senior Seminar in Sport Management*Your Choice from BAE GLOBAL LIST includes ECO 233 Comparative Economics or ECO 301 International Economics or BUS 310 Operations Management or BUS 368 International Management or BUS 374 International Marketing.

Combined Major in Business Administration

Requirements:

  • ACC 101 Financial Accounting
  • BUS 246 Management Principles
  • BUS 247 Marketing Management
  • BUS 310 Operations Management
  • BUS 345 Financial Management
  • BUS 366 Management of Information
  • BUS 380 Business, Government & Society
  • BUS 460 Strategies & Policies
  • General studies courses ECO 105 Principles of Economics (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Social Science requirement) and ECO 207 Statistics (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Quantitative requirement)
  • Note: Combined majors will receive a track designation if the four required upper-level courses are completed. Students considering combining Business Administration with Economics should consult the department chair for the required courses.

Accounting

Requirements:

  • ACC 101 Financial
  • ACC 201 Intermediate I
  • ACC 202 Intermediate II
  • ACC 325 Cost
  • ACC 330 Tax
  • ACC 331 Advanced Tax
  • ACC 338 Advanced
  • ACC 408 Auditing
  • ACC 480 – International Accounting Seminar
  • ECO 207 Statistics
  • BUS 345 Financial Management
  • One business/economics course (200-level or above)
  • ACC 110 Computer Applications for Business
  • Students must select ECO 105 Principles of Economics as a General Studies Foundations-Social Science course and MAT 125 Calculus for Business as a General Studies Foundations-Quantitative Reasoning course.

Combined Major in Accounting

Requirements:

  • ACC 101 Financial
  • ACC 201 Intermediate I
  • ACC 202 Intermediate II
  • ACC 325 Cost
  • ACC 330 Tax
  • ACC 338 Advanced
  • ACC 408 Auditing
  • ACC 480 – International Accounting Seminar

Economics

Requirements:

  • ACC 101 Financial
  • ECO 105 Principles of Economics (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Social Science requirement)
  • ECO 207 Statistics
  • ECO 302 History of Economics
  • ECO 307 Econometrics
  • ECO 335 Intermediate Microeconomics
  • ECO 336 Intermediate Macroeconomics
  • ECO 492 Seminar in Economics
  • MAT 125 Business Calculus or 131 Calculus I (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Quantitative requirement)
  • An economic fields requirement of five additional economics courses above the 100-level

Combined Major in Economics

Requirements:

  • ECO 105 Principles of Economics (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Social Science requirement)
  • ECO 207 Statistics
  • ECO 302 History of Economics
  • ECO 307 Econometrics
  • ECO 335 Intermediate Microeconomics
  • ECO 336 Intermediate Macroeconomics
  • ECO 492 Seminar in Economics
  • MAT 125 Business Calculus or 131 Calculus I (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Quantitative requirement)
  • One additional economics course above the 100-level

Note: Students considering combining economics and business administration should consult the department chair for the required courses.

Interdisciplinary Major in Accounting, Economics and Finance

The interdisciplinary major in Accounting, Economics and Finance blends coursework in accounting, economics and finance to create an integrated foundation for professional careers or further study in accounting and financial analysis. The major enables you to enhance you understanding in these fields by adding dimensions not possible in the regular or combined majors in accounting, economics and business administration-finance.

Students whose primary focus is accounting, but who wish to add an emphasis in financial analysis, should take the Accounting Track within the interdisciplinary major in Accounting, Economics and Finance.

Students whose primary focus is financial analysis need a strong understanding of both business financial statements and the methods of economic analysis. These students should take the Financial Analyst Track within the interdisciplinary major in Accounting, Economics and Finance. The Financial Analyst Track is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions in financial analysis and to provide foundation knowledge for professional certification programs in finance and financial analysis.

Students graduating with the interdisciplinary major in Accounting, Economics and Finance must complete the core requirements below and either the Accounting Track requirements or the Financial Analyst Track requirements listed below.

Core Major Requirements:

  • ACC 101 Financial
  • ACC 201 Intermediate I
  • ACC 202 Intermediate II
  • ACC 325 Cost
  • BUS 247 Marketing Management
  • BUS 345 Financial Management
  • BUS 350 Investments
  • BUS 495 Seminar in Finance
  • ECO 313 Money & Banking
  • One From: BUS 366 Management of Information or ACC 110 Computers for Business
  • ECO 105 Principles of Economics (General Studies Foundations-Social Science)
  • ECO 207 (General Studies Foundations-Quantitative)

Accounting Track Requirements:

  • ACC 330 Tax
  • ACC 331 Advanced Tax
  • ACC 338 Advanced
  • ACC 408 Auditing

Financial Analyst Track Requirements:

  • BUS 246 Management Principles
  • ECO 307 Econometrics
  • ECO 335 Intermediate Microeconomics
  • ECO 336 Intermediate Macroeconomics

Digital Media


Minor in Digital Media

The Digital Media Minor provides in-depth study of Digital Media through a selection of five courses.

Requirements:

  • ART 265 Computer Graphics
  • DIG 201 Digital Video I
  • DIG 265 Digital Literacy
  • DIG 270 Digital Illustration and Design
  • DIG 315 Web Design

Digital Studio Art


Requirements

  • ART 101 Drawing
  • ART 103 Design
  • ART 113 Sculpture
  • ART 216 Photography or ART 112 Painting I
  • ART 256 Modern Art and Design Concepts
  • ART 265 Computer Graphics
  • ART 400 Studio Topics (Painting, Sculpture or Digital Studio)
  • DIG 265 Digital Literacy
  • SYN 352 Aesthetic Rebels in Film and Art (formerly IDS 252)
  • Three courses from:
    • DIG 201 Video I
    • DIG 270 Digital Illustration and Design
    • DIG 315 Web Design or DIG 283 Visual Design for the Web
    • ART 212 Painting II or ART 213 Scupture II
  • DIG 420 Senior Seminar

One of the ART courses may also be used to satisfy the Foundations-Fine Arts requirement of the General Education Curriculum.

English-Theatre


See English section or Theatre section for specific course requirements.

Students interested in this concentration should contact Professor Alberto Cacicedo in the English Department or Professor Julia Matthews in the Theatre Department.

Fashion and Costume


The Fashion Department offers the following majors:

  • Design and Merchandising
  • Fashion Merchandising
  • Fashion Design
  • Costume Design
  • Combine Major in Fashion

These areas possess a commonality of mission and provide you with a curriculum that addresses issues of creative research and development, design, manufacturing, marketing and the consumerism of textiles and apparel products.

Students majoring in fashion must complete the core requirements and the requirements for one of the tracks.

Core Requirements

  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS283 Fashion History
  • FAS482 Internship

Track Requirements
Design and Merchandising

  • ACC101 Accounting(General Studies Math)
  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals (with lab)
  • FAS208 Fashion Business
  • FAS225 CAD
  • FAS230 Fashion Illustration
  • FAS284 Intermediate Construction
  • FAS372 Concept Development
  • BUS247 Marketing Management
  • FAS490 Senior Seminar(Design OR Merchandising)
  • Two of the following:
    • FAS218 Visual Merchandising
    • FAS210 Fashion Product Develop.
    • FAS376 Retailing
    • FAS315 Fashion Merch. Communications
    • FAS309 Lifestyle Marketing
    • FAS342 Patternmaking
    • FAS340 Draping
    • FAS345 Electronic Patternmaking
    • BUS365 Entrepreneurship
    • BUS374 International Marketing

* Students should choose one track for their internship and the other track for their senior seminar.

Fashion Merchandising

  • ECO105 Economics(General Studies Soc. Sci.)
  • ACC101 Accounting(General Studies Math)
  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals (with lab)
  • FAS208 Fashion Business
  • FAS210 Fashion Product Development
  • FAS376 Retailing
  • FAS315 Fashion Communications
  • FAS309 Lifestyle Marketing
  • BUS247 Marketing Management
  • FAS490C Senior Seminar, Merch.
  • One of the following:
    • FAS218 Visual Merchandising
    • BUS365 Entrepreneurship
    • BUS246 Management Principles
    • BUS374 International Marketing

Fashion Design

  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals (with lab)
  • FAS225 CAD I
  • FAS230 Fashion Illustration
  • FAS284 Intermediate Construction
  • FAS340 Draping
  • FAS342 Patternmaking
  • FAS350 Advanced Construction
  • FAS372 Concept Dev, Fashion Design
  • FAS3XX 300 Level Design Special Topics
  • FAS490A Senior Seminar Design

Costume Design

  • THR101 Creative Process (General Studies ART)
  • THR201 Production Experience
  • THR210 Design Fundamentals
  • FAS/THR220 Costume Construction
  • FAS230 Design & Illustration
  • THR288 Great Ages of Theater I OR THR289 Great Ages of Theater II
  • THR/FAS320 Stage Costuming
  • FAS225 CAD
  • FAS340 Draping
  • FAS342 Patternmaking
  • FAS490C Senior Seminar Costume Design
  • Suggested Elective: THR214 Stage Make Up

Combined Major

The following requirements are for students matriculating Fall 2018 and after. Students who matriculated before Fall 2018 see the requirements below.

  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals
  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS283 Fashion History
  • FAS49 Seminar Design or Merchandising
  • ECO105 Economics OR ART103 Design I (captured Gen Ed.)
  • Two of the following:
    • FAS208 Fashion Business
    • FAS210 Fashion Product Development
    • FAS218 Visual Merchandising
    • FAS225 CAD
    • FAS230 Fashion Illustration
    • FAS340 Draping
    • FAS342 Patternmaking
    • FAS315 Fashion Merchandising Communications
    • FAS376 Retailing

The following requirements are for students matriculating before Fall 2018.

Combined Majors
Fashion Merchandising Combined Major

  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals
  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS203 Fashion History I (Prehistoric-18th Century) OR FAS204 Fashion History II (19th- 21st Century)
  • FAS490C Senior Seminar in Merchandising
  • ECO105 Economics (General Studies Foundations Social Science) OR ACC101 Accounting (General Studies Foundations Quantitative)
  • Select two of the following:
    • FAS208 Fashion Business
    • FAS218 Visual Merchandising
    • FAS210 Product Development
    • FAS376 Retailing
    • FAS309 Lifestyle Marketing
    • FAS315 Fashion Communications
    • BUS347 Marketing Management
    • BUS365 Small Business Management

Fashion Design Combined Major 

  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals
  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS203 Fashion History I (Prehistoric-18th Century) OR FAS204 Fashion History II (19th-21st Century)
  • FAS490A Senior Seminar in Design
  • ART102 Life Drawing
  • Select two of the following:
    • FAS230 Design and Illustration
    • FAS244 Patternmaking/Draping
    • FAS325 CAD
    • FAS372 Concept Development, Fashion Design
    • FAS350 Advanced Construction
    • FAS355 Brand Development

Costume Design Combined Major 

  • FAS220 Costume Construction
  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS203 Fashion History I (prehistoric-18th Century) OR FAS204 Fashion History II (19th-21st Century)
  • FAS490B Senior Seminar in Costume
  • THR101 Creative Process (General Studies Foundations Fine Arts)
  • Select two of the following:
    • FAS230 Design and Illustration
    • FAS244 Patternmaking/Draping
    • FAS325 CAD
    • FAS320 Stage Costuming
    • THR201 Production Experience (four productions)
    • THR288 Great Ages of Theatre I or THR289 Great Ages of Theatre II

Music


Majors and Minors in Music Industry Studies

The world of commercial music has undergone a seismic shift in identity and purpose as young, entrepreneurial artists have taken control of both the content and delivery of their artistic material to the mass market — thanks to advances in digital technology and user-friendly online distribution systems. This is not a trend but the new face of doing music business in a digital world, assuming one has the harnessed skill sets and problem solving abilities necessary to thrive in both the worlds of artistry and industry. To prepare students for this exciting and multi-faceted profession, Albright’s Department of Music offers three academic degree programs. 

Note that a formal audition is not required for admission into the Music Department.


The Music Industry Studies Major

In the Fall of 2014, the Department of Music introduced our bachelor of arts degree in Music Industry Studies — an interdisciplinary major that integrates three academic areas of focus:  Artistry, Industry, and Technology.

The first focus, Artistry, includes courses in music history, theory, harmony, songwriting, commercial arranging, and private instruction (voice, piano, guitar, etc.). The second focus, Industry, harnesses our department’s existing Music Business curriculum to examine topics as diverse as: artist management; music distribution; licensing; copywriting; marketing and promotion; and, music law. The degree program culminates with two capstone experiences: an academic seminar in entrepreneurship and a pre-professional internship. Our Technology strand includes contact time within the arenas of audio technology (live sound), recording technology, and music production.

Requirements for the Music Industry Studies Major:

Artistry

– MUS 209 Applied Lessons (four semesters required)
– MUS 211 Commercial Music Theory I
– MUS 212 Commercial Music Theory II
– MUS 311 Commercial Arranging
– MUS 312 Songwriting

Industry

– MUS 243 The Business of Music: An Introduction
– MUS 244 Music Marketing and Promotion
– MUS 344 Artist Management
– MUS 345 Music Law
– MUS 391 Concert Promotion

Technology

– MUS 250 Introduction to Music Technology
– MUS 251 Recording Technology
– MUS 351 Music Production

Capstone Experiences

– MUS 482 Internship
– MUS 495 Senior Seminar

General Education (First Year Seminar – Recommended)

– FYS 100 History of the Recording Industry
– FYS 100 Cultural Politics of Hip Hop

General Education (Foundations/Fine Arts – Choose 1 of the Following 3 Courses)

– MUS 111 Introduction to Commercial Music Theory
– MUS 113 Popular Music and American Culture
– MUS 125 All That Jazz
– MUS 126 Music and the Cinema


The Music Industry Co-Major

As one of our country’s “Top 25 Schools for Artistic Students” (Newsweek, 2011), it goes without saying that for Albrightians, music is art.  But, since Albright also houses one of the country’s leading programs in Music Industry (Billboard, 2013), at Albright — music is also commerce.  Our interdisciplinary and experiential approach to learning is the perfect environment for aspiring artists and budding entrepreneurs to collaborate and envision the creative path of professional music in the near and distant future. The seven courses that comprise our Music Industry co-major — which you can combine with any other department’s co-major (Accounting, Spanish, or Arts Administration, for example) is designed to prepare you for an exciting career inside the business of the music industry.  As you can see, there is lot of flexibility within the combined major to offer you the ability to create the program that best suits your abilities and career goals.

Requirements for the Music Industry Co-Major

Four (4) Required Courses:

– MUS 243 The Business of Music: An Introduction
– MUS 244 Music Marketing and Promotion
– MUS 250 Introduction to Music Technology
– MUS 482 Internship

Two (2) 300-level courses in Music Industry from the following:

– MUS 391 Concert Promotion
– MUS 344 Artist Management
– MUS 345 Music Law

One (1) course in Applied Music/Music Appreciation from the following:

– MUS 103 Symphonic Band (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 104 String Chamber Orchestra (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 105 Concert Choir (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 109 Applied Music Lessons (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 111 Introduction to Commercial Music Theory
– MUS 113 Popular Music and American Culture
– MUS 120 Music Appreciation: Introduction to Western Music
– MUS 125 All That Jazz
– MUS 126 Music and the Cinema
– MUS 211 Commercial Music Theory I

One (1) course to satisfy General Studies: Foundations: Fine Arts recommended from the following:

– MUS 113 Popular Music and American Culture
– MUS 120 Music Appreciation: Introduction to Western Music
– MUS 125 All That Jazz
– MUS 126 Music and the Cinema


The Music Industry Minor

One of the finest aspects to Albright’s interdisciplinary approach to learning is that our students are actively encouraged to expand their intellectual horizons by combining disparate areas of concentration to tailor-make an undergraduate experience as academically unique and satisfying as they can imagine. For those students who wish to augment their academic experience with an added focus in Music Industry, we offer a five-course minor.

Two (2) Required Courses:

– MUS 243 The Business of Music: An Introduction
– MUS 244 Music Marketing and Promotion

Two (2) courses at the 200 or 300 level from the following:

– MUS 211 Commercial Music Theory I
– MUS 212 Commercial Music Theory II
– MUS 344 Artist Management
– MUS 345 Music Law

One (1) additional Music Department course at any level

Recommended: one (1) course from the following to satisfy General Studies: Foundations: Fine Arts

– MUS 113 Popular Music in American Culture
– MUS 125 All That Jazz
– MUS 126 Music and the Cinema


The Music Minor

For those students who wish to augment their academic experience with an added focus in the rudiments of Applied Music, we offer a five-course minor.

Two (2) Required Courses

– MUS 120 Music Appreciation: Introduction to Western Music
– MUS 211 Commercial Music Theory I

Two (2) courses from the following (chosen with consultation of Department Chair):

– MUS 113 Rags, Rock and Rap: Popular Music and American Culture
– MUS 212 Commercial Music Theory II
– MUS 250 Introduction to Music Technology
– MUS 251 Recording Technology
– MUS 312 Songwriting

Four (4) Semesters of Study in Applied Music

– MUS 103 Symphonic Band (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 104 String Chamber Orchestra (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 105 Concert Choir (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 109 Applied Music Lessons (requires four semesters of study for credit)

Music Industry Studies


Majors and Minors in Music

The world of commercial music has undergone a seismic shift in identity and purpose as young, entrepreneurial artists have taken control of both the content and delivery of their artistic material to the mass market — thanks to advances in digital technology and user-friendly online distribution systems. This is not a trend but the new face of doing music business in a digital world, assuming one has the harnessed skill sets and problem solving abilities necessary to thrive in both the worlds of artistry and industry. To prepare students for this exciting and multi-faceted profession, Albright’s Department of Music offers three academic degree programs. 

Note that a formal audition is not required for admission into the Music Department.


The Music Industry Studies Major

In the Fall of 2014, the Department of Music introduced our bachelor of arts degree in Music Industry Studies — an interdisciplinary major that integrates three academic areas of focus:  Artistry, Industry, and Technology.

The first focus, Artistry, includes courses in music history, theory, harmony, songwriting, commercial arranging, and private instruction (voice, piano, guitar, etc.). The second focus, Industry, harnesses our department’s existing Music Business curriculum to examine topics as diverse as: artist management; music distribution; licensing; copywriting; marketing and promotion; and, music law. The degree program culminates with two capstone experiences: an academic seminar in entrepreneurship and a pre-professional internship. Our Technology strand includes contact time within the arenas of audio technology (live sound), recording technology, and music production.

Requirements for the Music Industry Studies Major:

Artistry (5 courses)

– MUS 209 Applied Lessons (four semesters required)
– MUS 211 Commercial Music Theory I
– MUS 212 Commercial Music Theory II
– MUS 311 Commercial Arranging
– MUS 312 Songwriting

Industry (5 courses)

– MUS 243 The Business of Music: An Introduction
– MUS 244 Entertainment Marketing
– MUS 344 Artist Management
– MUS 345 Music Law
– MUS 391 Event Promotion

Technology (4 courses)

– MUS 250 Introduction to Music Technology
– MUS 251 Recording Technology
– MUS 350 Mixing & Mastering
– MUS 351 Music Production

Capstone Experiences (2 courses)

– MUS 482 Internship
– MUS 495 Senior Seminar


The Music Industry Co-Major

As one of our country’s “Top 25 Schools for Artistic Students” (Newsweek, 2011), it goes without saying that for Albrightians, music is art.  But, since Albright also houses one of the country’s leading programs in Music Industry (Billboard, 2013), at Albright — music is also commerce.  Our interdisciplinary and experiential approach to learning is the perfect environment for aspiring artists and budding entrepreneurs to collaborate and envision the creative path of professional music in the near and distant future. The seven courses that comprise our Music Industry co-major — which you can combine with any other department’s co-major (Accounting, Spanish, or Arts Administration, for example) is designed to prepare you for an exciting career inside the business of the music industry.  As you can see, there is lot of flexibility within the combined major to offer you the ability to create the program that best suits your abilities and career goals.

Requirements for the Music Industry Co-Major

Four (4) Required Courses:

– MUS 243 The Business of Music: An Introduction
– MUS 244 Entertainment Marketing
– MUS 250 Introduction to Music Technology
– MUS 482 Internship

Two (2) 300-level courses in Music Industry from the following:

– MUS 391 Event Promotion
– MUS 344 Artist Management
– MUS 345 Music Law

One (1) course in Applied Music/Music Appreciation from the following:

– MUS 103 Symphonic Band (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 104 String Chamber Orchestra (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 105 Concert Choir (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 109 Applied Music Lessons (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 111 Introduction to Commercial Music Theory
– MUS 113 Popular Music and American Culture
– MUS 120 Music Appreciation: Introduction to Western Music
– MUS 125 All That Jazz
– MUS 126 Music and the Cinema
– MUS 211 Commercial Music Theory I

One (1) course to satisfy General Studies: Foundations: Fine Arts recommended from the following:

– MUS 113 Popular Music and American Culture
– MUS 120 Music Appreciation: Introduction to Western Music
– MUS 125 All That Jazz
– MUS 126 Music and the Cinema


The Music Industry Minor

One of the finest aspects to Albright’s interdisciplinary approach to learning is that our students are actively encouraged to expand their intellectual horizons by combining disparate areas of concentration to tailor-make an undergraduate experience as academically unique and satisfying as they can imagine. For those students who wish to augment their academic experience with an added focus in Music Industry, we offer a five-course minor.

Two (2) Required Courses:

– MUS 243 The Business of Music: An Introduction
– MUS 244 Entertainment Marketing

Two (2) courses at the 200 or 300 level from the following:

– MUS 211 Commercial Music Theory I
– MUS 212 Commercial Music Theory II
– MUS 344 Artist Management
– MUS 345 Music Law

One (1) additional Music Department course at any level

Recommended: one (1) course from the following to satisfy General Studies: Foundations: Fine Arts

– MUS 113 Popular Music in American Culture
– MUS 125 All That Jazz
– MUS 126 Music and the Cinema


The Music Production Minor

The Music Production Minor allows students to develop the foundational technical skills and hands-on experience necessary to thrive in the world of audio recording, music production, and sound design. Through the five courses in the minor, students will design, record, mix, and master original music and sound projects, as well as collaborate with artists on the campus record label, Lion Records, to produce and distribute music on the global marketplace. Upon completion of the core Music Technology courses, students will gain industry-standard certifications in music recording and sound design software. Contact Dr. Mike D’Errico—Director of Music Technology & Composition—at (610) 921-7268, mderrico@albright.edu for more information.

Required Courses:

– MUS 250 Introduction to Music Technology
– DIG 250 Sound Design for Visual Media
– MUS 251 Recording Technology
– MUS 350 Mixing & Mastering
– MUS 351 Music Production


The African American Music Minor

The African American music minor provides students the opportunity to explore interdisciplinary connections between music and Black culture through histories and repertoires that define U.S. culture and have wide-ranging implications around the world. Since the arrival of enslaved Africans in the United States, African American music has served as oral history, social commentary, political protest, expressions of communal belonging and hope for better futures. In addition to elements of musicianship and characteristics of musical style, studying African American music requires explorations of the music’s value and meaning within African American communities, in the United States, and around the world. Course offerings in applied music, music history, and pop music studies—as well as relevant courses in the Humanities—afford students many potential, individualized programs of study to engage their interests and augment their other coursework. For more information contact Dr. Mark Lomanno at (610) 921-7876 or mlomanno@albright.edu.

Required Courses:

  • Three of the following
    • MUS 103C – Jazz Combos (4 semesters)
    • MUS 103D – Rap Collective (4 semesters)
    • MUS 105C – Gospel Ensemble (4 semesters)
    • MUS 113 – American Popular Music
    • MUS 121 – Black Popular Music
    • MUS 125 – Jazz Past, Present, and Futures
    • MUS 221 – Afrofuturism
    • MUS 284 – Popular Music and Digital Culture
    • MUS/SYN 387 – Improvisation
  • Two of the following interdisciplinary courses
    • ENG 210 – African American Literature
    • ENG 235 – African American Autobiography
    • ENG 390 – Harlem Renaissance
    • HIS 212 – African American History
    • HIS 324 – African Americans and the Great Migration
    • HIS 352 – African Diaspora
    • REL 267 – African and African-American Religious Traditions
    • SYN306 – Hip Hop

Additional offerings with the approval of the program advisor


The Music Minor

For those students who wish to augment their academic experience with an added focus in the rudiments of Applied Music, we offer a five-course minor.

Two (2) Required Courses

– MUS 120 Music Appreciation: Introduction to Western Music
– MUS 211 Commercial Music Theory I

Two (2) courses from the following (chosen with consultation of Department Chair):

– MUS 113 Rags, Rock and Rap: Popular Music and American Culture
– MUS 212 Commercial Music Theory II
– MUS 250 Introduction to Music Technology
– MUS 251 Recording Technology
– MUS 312 Songwriting

Four (4) Semesters of Study in Applied Music

– MUS 103 Symphonic Band (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 104 String Chamber Orchestra (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 105 Concert Choir (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 109 Applied Music Lessons (requires four semesters of study for credit)

Photography


The Photography Minor provides in-depth study of photography through a selection of five courses. Specific course requirements are listed in the Art Department section.

Theatre


Majors and Minors in Theatre

The Theatre Department invites students to examine the impact of their original creative work through the critical lens of an ever-deepening appreciation for the stage’s rich cultural heritage via an academic course of study that combines theory with practice.  We offer an array of courses and experiences designed to explore the wide-ranging history, literature, and aesthetics of this timeless art form alongside a variety of practical courses that provide students with the fundamental skills and crafts necessary for producing theatre in today’s professional world.

We offer a Bachelor of Arts degree to majors in Theatre; however, many students opt to combine Theatre with another major, such as Arts Administration, Education, Communications, Fashion, English, History, or Music. Courses in costume design and stage makeup are offered in cooperation with the Fashion Department and our new interdisciplinary major in Digital Video Arts prepares students to employ their theatrical creativity toward careers in film and new media. In all cases, we encourage our students to develop their resume along with their transcript.  Internships, study abroad, and student driven projects provide the real world applications of the classroom experiences.

Requirements for the Theatre Major

– THR 101 The Creative Process (required for General Studies: Foundations: Fine Arts)

– THR 110 Introduction to Theatre Technology

– THR 150 Acting Studio I

– THR 210 Design Fundamentals

– THR 280 Script Analysis

– THR 288 Great Ages of Theatre I

– THR 289 Great Ages of Theatre I

– THR 491 Senior Seminar

One of the following skills courses:

– THR 211 Stagecraft

– THR 212 Theatre Electrics

– THR 213 Audio Technology

– THR 214 Stage Makeup

– THR/FAS 220 Costume Construction

– THR 250 Acting Studio II

– THR 252 Acting for the Camera

– THR 255 Improvisational Theatre

– THR 260 Playwriting

One of the following 300-level dramatic literature courses:

– THR 388 Postmodern American Drama

– THR 389 Postmodern British and European Drama

– ENG 354 Shakespeare

One of the following 400-level courses:

– THR 401 Advanced Production Experience
(requires two formal production assignments)

– THR 482 Advanced Internship

Three other theatre courses selected in consultation with adviser


The Theatre Co-Major

One of the finest aspects of Albright’s interdisciplinary approach to learning is that our students are actively encouraged to expand their intellectual and artistic horizons by combining areas of concentration to tailor-make an undergraduate experience as academically unique and satisfying as they can imagine. Many students opt to combine theatre with another major, such as Arts Administration, Education, Communications, English, History or Music Industry. As you can see, there is lot of flexibility within the combined major in Theatre to offer you the ability to create the program that best suits your abilities and career goals.

Requirements for the Theatre Combined Major

– THR 101 The Creative Process (required for General Studies: Foundations: Fine Arts)

– THR 110 Introduction to Theatre Technology

– THR 150 Acting Studio I

– THR 210 Design Fundamentals

– THR 280 Script Analysis

– THR 491 Senior Seminar

One of the following Theatre History Courses:

– THR 288 Great Ages of Theatre I

– THR 289 Great Ages of Theatre I

One of the following 300-level dramatic literature courses:

– ENG 354 Shakespeare

– THR 388 Postmodern American Drama

– THR 389 Postmodern British and European Drama


The Theatre Minor

Our interdisciplinary and experiential approach to learning is the perfect environment for aspiring artist scholars to examine the nature and purpose of the live theatrical event in relation to their academic studies in other departments. For those students who wish to augment their scholarly experience with a peripheral focus in Theatre, we offer a five course minor.

Requirements for the Theatre Minor

– THR 101 The Creative Process (required for General Studies: Foundations: Fine Arts)

– THR 150 Acting Studio I

– THR 280 Script Analysis

One of the following Skills Courses:

– THR 210 Design Fundamentals

– THR 211 Stagecraft

– THR 212 Theatre Electrics

– THR 213 Audio Technology

– THR 214 Stage Makeup

– THR/FAS 220 Costume Construction

– THR 250 Acting Studio II

– THR 252 Acting for the Camera

– THR 255 Improvisational Theatre

– THR 260 Playwriting

One of the following 300-level dramatic literature courses:

– THR 388 Postmodern American Drama

– THR 389 Postmodern British and European Drama

– ENG 354 Shakespeare

One other theatre courses selected in consultation with adviser


Interdisciplinary Major in English-Theatre

Winston Churchill famously said that Britain and America are two nations separated by a single language. The same is true of the two departments involved in this major. Literature people read texts that were written to be performed, and theatre people perform texts that were written in the first place; theatre people forget the literacy frame of the text and literary people forget its dramatic matrix. Falling in the gap between the two approaches is the curiously intermediate phenomenon of dramatic art itself, the enactment of a text. The primary goal of the English-Theatre interdisciplinary concentration is therefore to offer students a systematic way to try to fill that gap, so that, for instance, the function of metaphor will be as vivid to the theatrical as to the literary person and the function of the performance will be as significant to the literary as to the theatrical person.

Students interested in this concentration should contact Professor Alberto Cacicedo in the English Department or Professor Julia Matthews in the Theatre Department.

– THR 101 The Creative Process (recommended as General Studies: Foundations: Fine Arts)

_ ENG 204 American Literature (recommended as General Studies: Connections-Humanities)

– ENG 201 Major British Texts to 1780

– ENG 202 Major British Texts from 1780 to the Present

– THR 280 Script Analysis

– ENG 354 Shakespeare

– THR 388 Postmodern American Drama

– THR 389 Postmodern British and European Drama

– THR 491 Senior Seminar

One of the following Theatre Skills Courses:

– THR 150 Acting Studio I

– THR 210 Design Fundamentals

– THR 211 Stagecraft

– THR 212 Theatre Electrics

– THR 213 Audio Technology

One of the following Theatre History Courses:

– THR 288 Great Ages of Theatre I

– THR 289 Great Ages of Theatre I

One of the following English Courses

– ENG 350 Old English Literature & Language

– ENG 352 Chaucer

– ENG 355 Renaissance Literature

– ENG 356 Milton and the 17th Century

– ENG 357 Dryden to Black:  Restoration and 18th Century Literature

– ENG 366 Romanticism:  Monsters and Vision on the Brain

– ENG 368 Literature of the Victorian Era

– ENG 372 British Fiction to 1890

– ENG 373 Modern British and Irish Fiction

– ENG 374 European Fiction

-One from the following English Courses

– ENG 380 Modern American Women Poets

– ENG 384 Major American Writers to 1865

– ENG 385 Major American Writers from 1865 to the Present

– ENG 386 Modern American Fiction

One from the following Two Seminar Courses

– ENG 399 Seminar on Theory and Methods

– ENG 491 Senior Seminar: The Discipline of English Studies


Digital Video Arts

The Digital Video Arts Interdisciplinary Major was terminated on December 15, 2017. Students declared in this major on this date can continue with it, but no other students can declare it.

Introductory/Aesthetics

ART 265 Computer Graphics (required for General Studies: Foundations: Fine Arts)

THR 101: The Creative Process

DIG 265: Digital Literacy

THR 150: Acting Studio I

DIG 201: Video I

THR 280: Script Analysis

Skill Sets

THR 213: Audio Technology

MUS 241: Electronic Music I

THR 252: Acting and the Camera

THR 361: Screenwriting

DIG 300: Digital Media Production

DIG 301: Video II

ARA 390: Project Management-Arts Administration

Capstones

THR/DIG 382: Internship

DIG 420: Senior Seminar: Producing

Business at Albright

Albright business students can choose from several different specializations and start business coursework right away.

Business Administration Specializations

Economics
Entertainment Industry
Finance
International Business
Management
Marketing
Sport Management

Combined Majors

Business Administration
Accounting
Economics

Interdisciplinary Major

Accounting, Economics and Finance

Accelerated Adult Programs

Accounting
Business Administration
Digital Marketing & Sales


Program Requirements

Business, Accounting & Economics


Business Administration

Business studies at Albright are a blend of theory and application. You’ll receive hands-on experience through internships, simulations, field trips and case studies. The business administration major offers a comprehensive program that aptly combines in- and out-of-class learning.

Unlike at many other schools, you’ll start with business coursework in your freshman year, and during the course of your education will take classes in accounting, economics, statistics, finance, management, marketing, management information systems, business-government-society and business strategy. You’ll select from one of five specializations, with co-majors available through the use of electives.

Requirements:

  • ECO 105 Principles of Economics (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Social Science requirement)
  • ECO 207 Statistics (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Quantitative requirement)
  • A core requirement of these courses:
    • ACC 101 Financial Accounting
    • BUS 246 Management Principles
    • BUS 247 Marketing Management
    • BUS 250 Business Law I
    • BUS 310 Operations Management
    • BUS 345 Financial Management
    • BUS 366 Management of Information
    • BUS 380 Business, Government & Society
    • BUS 460 Strategies & Policies
  • One additional Economics course above the 100-level
  • In addition, students must complete four courses in one of the following tracks: Economics, Entertainment Industry, Finance, International Business, Management, Marketing or Sport Management.
    • Economics
      • ECO 307 Econometrics
      • ECO 335 Intermediate Microeconomics
      • ECO 336 Intermediate Macroeconomics
      • ECO 492 Seminar in Economics
      • *Your Choice from BAE GLOBAL LIST
    • Finance
      • BUS 350 Investments
      • BUS 495 Seminar in Finance
      • ECO 301 International Economics
      • ECO 307 Econometrics
      • ECO 313 Money & Banking
      • Note: Students interested in careers involving serious financial analysis are strongly encouraged to complete the interdisciplinary major in Accounting, Economics and Finance.
    • Entertainment Industry
      • BUS 310 Operations Management or ACC 220 Managerial Accounting
      • MUS 244 Music Marketing
      • MUS 344 Artist Management
      • MUS 345 Music Law
      • MUS 391 Concert Promotion
    • International Business
      • BUS 310 Operations Management
      • BUS 368 International Management
      • BUS 374 International Marketing
      • BUS 498 Seminar in International Business
      • ECO 233 Comparative Economics or ECO 301 International Economics
    • Management
      • BUS 310 Operations Management
      • BUS 365 Entrepreneurship
      • BUS 368 International Management
      • BUS 496 Seminar in Management
      • BUS 354 Sport Management or BUS 363 Human Resource Management or ACC 220 Managerial Accounting
    • Marketing
      • BUS 310 Operations Management
      • BUS 370 Marketing Strategies and Policies
      • BUS 372 Marketing Research
      • BUS 497 Seminar in Marketing
      • BUS 374 International Marketing or BUS 376 Retailing or BUS 378 Selling
    • Sport Management
      • BUS 310 Operations Management or ACC 220 Managerial Accounting
      • BUS 354 Sport Management
      • BUS 357 Sport Marketing
      • BUS 358 Sports Law or BUS 382 Internship (must be at 300 level and include a sport
        component)
      • BUS 494 Senior Seminar in Sport Management*Your Choice from BAE GLOBAL LIST includes ECO 233 Comparative Economics or ECO 301 International Economics or BUS 310 Operations Management or BUS 368 International Management or BUS 374 International Marketing.

Combined Major in Business Administration

Requirements:

  • ACC 101 Financial Accounting
  • BUS 246 Management Principles
  • BUS 247 Marketing Management
  • BUS 310 Operations Management
  • BUS 345 Financial Management
  • BUS 366 Management of Information
  • BUS 380 Business, Government & Society
  • BUS 460 Strategies & Policies
  • General studies courses ECO 105 Principles of Economics (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Social Science requirement) and ECO 207 Statistics (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Quantitative requirement)
  • Note: Combined majors will receive a track designation if the four required upper-level courses are completed. Students considering combining Business Administration with Economics should consult the department chair for the required courses.

Accounting

Requirements:

  • ACC 101 Financial
  • ACC 201 Intermediate I
  • ACC 202 Intermediate II
  • ACC 325 Cost
  • ACC 330 Tax
  • ACC 331 Advanced Tax
  • ACC 338 Advanced
  • ACC 408 Auditing
  • ACC 480 – International Accounting Seminar
  • ECO 207 Statistics
  • BUS 345 Financial Management
  • One business/economics course (200-level or above)
  • ACC 110 Computer Applications for Business
  • Students must select ECO 105 Principles of Economics as a General Studies Foundations-Social Science course and MAT 125 Calculus for Business as a General Studies Foundations-Quantitative Reasoning course.

Combined Major in Accounting

Requirements:

  • ACC 101 Financial
  • ACC 201 Intermediate I
  • ACC 202 Intermediate II
  • ACC 325 Cost
  • ACC 330 Tax
  • ACC 338 Advanced
  • ACC 408 Auditing
  • ACC 480 – International Accounting Seminar

Economics

Requirements:

  • ACC 101 Financial
  • ECO 105 Principles of Economics (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Social Science requirement)
  • ECO 207 Statistics
  • ECO 302 History of Economics
  • ECO 307 Econometrics
  • ECO 335 Intermediate Microeconomics
  • ECO 336 Intermediate Macroeconomics
  • ECO 492 Seminar in Economics
  • MAT 125 Business Calculus or 131 Calculus I (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Quantitative requirement)
  • An economic fields requirement of five additional economics courses above the 100-level

Combined Major in Economics

Requirements:

  • ECO 105 Principles of Economics (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Social Science requirement)
  • ECO 207 Statistics
  • ECO 302 History of Economics
  • ECO 307 Econometrics
  • ECO 335 Intermediate Microeconomics
  • ECO 336 Intermediate Macroeconomics
  • ECO 492 Seminar in Economics
  • MAT 125 Business Calculus or 131 Calculus I (satisfies General Studies Foundations-Quantitative requirement)
  • One additional economics course above the 100-level

Note: Students considering combining economics and business administration should consult the department chair for the required courses.

Interdisciplinary Major in Accounting, Economics and Finance

The interdisciplinary major in Accounting, Economics and Finance blends coursework in accounting, economics and finance to create an integrated foundation for professional careers or further study in accounting and financial analysis. The major enables you to enhance you understanding in these fields by adding dimensions not possible in the regular or combined majors in accounting, economics and business administration-finance.

Students whose primary focus is accounting, but who wish to add an emphasis in financial analysis, should take the Accounting Track within the interdisciplinary major in Accounting, Economics and Finance.

Students whose primary focus is financial analysis need a strong understanding of both business financial statements and the methods of economic analysis. These students should take the Financial Analyst Track within the interdisciplinary major in Accounting, Economics and Finance. The Financial Analyst Track is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions in financial analysis and to provide foundation knowledge for professional certification programs in finance and financial analysis.

Students graduating with the interdisciplinary major in Accounting, Economics and Finance must complete the core requirements below and either the Accounting Track requirements or the Financial Analyst Track requirements listed below.

Core Major Requirements:

  • ACC 101 Financial
  • ACC 201 Intermediate I
  • ACC 202 Intermediate II
  • ACC 325 Cost
  • BUS 247 Marketing Management
  • BUS 345 Financial Management
  • BUS 350 Investments
  • BUS 495 Seminar in Finance
  • ECO 313 Money & Banking
  • One From: BUS 366 Management of Information or ACC 110 Computers for Business
  • ECO 105 Principles of Economics (General Studies Foundations-Social Science)
  • ECO 207 (General Studies Foundations-Quantitative)

Accounting Track Requirements:

  • ACC 330 Tax
  • ACC 331 Advanced Tax
  • ACC 338 Advanced
  • ACC 408 Auditing

Financial Analyst Track Requirements:

  • BUS 246 Management Principles
  • ECO 307 Econometrics
  • ECO 335 Intermediate Microeconomics
  • ECO 336 Intermediate Macroeconomics

Communications at Albright

Innovation is the name of the game in today’s incredibly dynamic information age. And demand has never been higher for timely, well-informed communicators ready to help the world connect. Express your passion through digital or traditional media!


Programs

Communications
– Journalism Track
– Public Relations & Advertising Track
Digital Communications
Digital Media
Photography


Program Requirements

Communications


The Department of Communications offers conceptual and practical coursework and projects in a small, engaged community, developing effective, responsible, socially aware communicators.

We will guide you through courses and projects to develop a thoughtful and strategic approach to communications with an emphasis on hands-on applied projects to practice newly learned skills and gain insight on the impact of messaging.

Learn outside the classroom with The AlbrightianAlbright A.M.; Campus Radio News; or the College’s radio station, WXAC-FM.

The Communications major prepares you for careers in media and professional communications in a variety of corporate, government and non-profit settings, and for advanced study in the discipline.

Choose the Journalism track or Public Relations & Advertising Communications track, or opt for the Digital Communications Major.

Requirements for the Journalism Track

Core Courses:

COM 250 Media & Society
COM 260 Communication Theories (General Studies Foundations-Humanities)
COM 320 System of Free Expression
COM 321 Media History
COM 333 Practicum
COM 390 Multi-Platform Writing
COM 480 Senior Seminar in Communication Research

Journalism Track Courses:

COM 219 Magazine & Feature Writing
COM 222 Writing for Media
COM 315 Public Affairs Reporting
COM 316 Editing & Print Production
Three Electives, at least two of which must be from Communications, from: COM255, COM280, COM283, COM317, COM327, COM383, ART216, ART 265, DIG201, DIG301, DIG315, ENG235 (Literature of Journalism), HIS207, IDS208, IDS240, IDS252, PHI203, SOC331


Requirements for the Public Relations & Advertising Communications Track

Core Courses:

COM 250 Media & Society
COM 260 Communication Theories (General Studies Foundations-Humanities)
COM 320 System of Free Expression
COM 321 Media History
COM 333 Practicum
COM 390 Multi-Platform Writing
COM 480 Senior Seminar in Communication Research

Public Relations & Advertising Communication Track Courses:

COM 317 Campaign Planning
COM 327 Writing for Public Relations & Advertising
COM 337 Public Relations & Advertising Research
Four Electives, at least three of which must be from Communications, from: COM219, COM 222, COM255, COM280, COM283, COM316, COM383, ART216, ART265, DIG201, DIG301, DIG315, HIS207, PHI150, PHI203, SOC331


Requirements for the Communications Co-Majors

Core Courses:

COM 250 Media & Society
COM 260 Communication Theories (General Studies Foundations-Humanities)
COM 320 System of Free Expression or COM 321 Media History
COM 480 Senior Seminar in Communication Research

Track Courses

Journalism: COM 222, COM 315 and one of the following: COM 219, COM 316, COM 390

Public Relations & Advertising Communication: COM 317, COM 327, COM 337

One Communications Elective

Digital Communications


The Digital Communications major is grounded in theory, social impact, and industry practice and extends practical experience in both writing and visual design and production, culminating with two senior-level courses. Students will take:

  • 6 theory/social impact/industry practices courses
  • 3 writing courses
  • 3 visual design and production courses
  • 2 senior-level courses

Theory/Social Impact/Industry Practice

Required: 
COM260/DIG260: Communication Theories in the Semiotics of Digital Media
DIG201: Digital Video
DIG265: Digital Literacy
COM250: Mass Communication & Society
COM/DIG 333: Practicum
DIG301: Video Production II

Choose one: 
COM317: Public Relations & Advertising
COM321: Media History
COM320: Freedom of Expression

Writing

Required:
COM222: Writing for Mass Media
COM390: Multiplatform writing

Choose one: 
COM315: Public Affairs Reporting
COM219: Feature Writing
COM327: Writing for Public Relations & Advertising

Visual Design and Production

Choose One FOCUS:
FOCUS 1 
DIG315: Web Design
DIG325: Visual Design for the Web
FOCUS 2 
DIG270: Illustration & Design
DIG370: Design II

Senior Requirement 
COM480: Senior Seminar in Communications
DIG420: Capstone

Digital Media


Minor in Digital Media

The Digital Media Minor provides in-depth study of Digital Media through a selection of five courses.

Requirements:

  • ART 265 Computer Graphics
  • DIG 201 Digital Video I
  • DIG 265 Digital Literacy
  • DIG 270 Digital Illustration and Design
  • DIG 315 Web Design

Photography


The Photography Minor provides in-depth study of photography through a selection of five courses. Specific course requirements are listed in the Art Department section.

Computers and Mathematics at Albright

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that computer and information technology will grow much faster than the average for all occupations. Don’t just learn a skillset. Develop critical thinking and adaptability at Albright College to stay ahead of an ever-changing industry.


Programs

Computer Science
Game and Simulation Development
Information Systems
Mathematics
Physics

Accelerated Programs

Computer & Information Systems and Management
Computer Information Systems


Program Requirements

Computer Science


Major in Computer Science

  • CSC 141, 142
  • CSC 213
  • CSC 305, 306
  • Two 400-level courses
  • Three 300-level elective courses:  CSC 391 and two more from CSC 307, 372, 382 and 385
  • Three related mathematics courses: MAT 132 (pre-req. MAT 131), MAT 300 and MAT 320 (prerequisites for MAT 300 and 320 waived for computer science majors.)
  • MAT 131 should be taken as a general studies quantitative reasoning course.

Combined Major in Computer Science

• CSC 141, 142
• CSC 213
• CSC 305, 306
• One 400-level course
• One elective course from the elective courses listed above
• The related mathematics courses are recommended but are not required.


Combined Major in Information Systems

A student can only do a combined major in information systems; a student cannot major in information systems alone.

There continues to be an increasing demand for college graduates who possess an information systems (IS) degree. Projections are for the need to be further unmet over the next several years as the gap widens for supplying skilled individuals to IS jobs.  We are faced with a major shortage, not only with providing players with these needed skills, but also with providing new leadership in burgeoning areas as IS has moved into the mainstream of our economic culture.  Globalization of business markets adds the need for communication and project teamwork. To become a part of a graduate’s repertoire. Exhibiting the knowledge and skills that such an IS degree requires, graduates can expect to be in strong positions to compete for managerial and analytical positions in many fields, including software design, database management, network consulting and e-commerce business.

• IST 150
• CSC 141, 142
• CSC 305
• IST 301
• One 300-level IST course
• One 400-level IST course

A student is not allowed to combine information systems with computer science.  A student who is interested in this combination would work out a program of study within the Computer Science Department that would result in the student majoring in computer science with some information systems courses being chosen for the student’s departmental elective requirements.

Game and Simulation Development


Program Curriculum

  • ART 265 Computer Graphics (General Studies Foundations-Fine Arts)
  • CSC 141 Foundations of Computer Science I
  • CSC 142 Foundations of Computer Science II
  • CSC 311 Gaming Physics and Math
  • CSC 372 Graphics Programming
  • CSC 391 Mobile Programming
  • CSC 491 Client/Server (Networking for Games) or CSC 491 Artificial Intelligence Programming
  • DIG 250 Sound Design for Visual Media
  • DIG 280 Game History and Development
  • DIG 310 Introduction to Game Design
  • DIG 311 Experience Design
  • DIG 320 Simulation Design
  • DIG 380 Visual Programming (General Studies Foundations-Quantitative)
  • DIG 470 Game Production

Information Systems


A student can only do a combined major in information systems; a student cannot major in information systems alone.

A student is not allowed to combine information systems with computer science.  A student who is interested in this combination would work out a program of study within the Computer Science Department that would result in the student majoring in computer science with some information systems courses being chosen for the student’s departmental elective requirements.

  • IST 150
  • CSC 141, 142
  • CSC 305
  • IST 301
  • One 300-level IST course
  • One 400-level IST course

Mathematics


Major in Mathematics

MAT 131, 132, 233
MAT 250
MAT 320
MAT 325
MAT 431
Six elective mathematics courses at the 300-400 level
MAT 491
PHY 201 (satisfies the General Studies Foundations Natural Science Requirement)

Students interested in pursuing graduate study in mathematics are strongly encouraged to take MAT 310, 334, 360, 435, 438, 440, and CSC141.


Secondary Mathematics Education

Mathematics Majors preparing for a career in education take Math courses and a series of Education and other courses specified by the Education Department to meet Pennsylvania Department of Education regulations. As early as possible in their college experience, candidates for teacher certification in English should consult the Requirements section of the Education website and the chair of Education regarding specific course requirements. The Mathematics Education certification is a grades 7-12 program.


Combined Major in Mathematics

For Classes before the Class of 2023
MAT 131, 132, 233
MAT 250
Three elective mathematics courses at the 300-400 level
MAT 491

Beginning with the Class of 2023
MAT 131, 132, 233
MAT 250
MAT 320
Two elective mathematics courses at the 300-400 level
MAT 491


Students interested in the actuarial profession should take MAT 131, 132, 233, 250, 310, 320, 360, 491, CSC 141, ECON 105, 207, 307, and should co-major in economics, accounting, or business.  Exam P and Exam FM should be taken before graduation.

Physics


The Department of Physics offers a flexible course of study that prepares you for success in a wide range of technically related fields. Opportunities after graduation include graduate study, industrial research and development, engineering, teaching, technical management and software development. We’ll give you an excellent education in the fundamentals of physics, with special emphasis on strong mathematical skills, advanced laboratory training and collaborative student-faculty research.
You can choose from among three major tracks of study:

  • General physics, in preparation for graduate study in physics or for work in industry
  • Optical physics, in preparation for a career in industrial research and development or engineering, or for graduate study in physics/optics
  • Secondary education certification in physics, in preparation for certification by the state of Pennsylvania as a high school physics teacher

Physics majors interested in graduate programs are encouraged to take courses beyond the basic requirements. Since requirements for graduate programs vary, you are encouraged to seek advice from faculty members in the department. Students interested in pursuing teacher certification in physics must consult the chair of the Department of Education regarding specific requirements for the program.

 

Requirements for the General Physics track:
First Year:

  • MAT 131, 132
  • Students with strong high school preparation may take PHY 201, 202

Second Year:

  • PHY 201, 202
  • MAT 233, 334
  • PHY 255 (formerly IDS 255)

Third Year:

  • PHY 203, 251, 340

Fourth Year:

  • PHY 262, 351, 431, 441, 490

Requirements for the Optical Physics track:
First Year:

  • MAT 131, 132
  • Students with strong high school preparation may take PHY 201, 202
  • OPT 101 (optional)

Second Year:

  • PHY 201, 202
  • MAT 233, 334
  • PHY 255 (formerly IDS 255)

Third Year:

  • PHY 203
  • OPT 241, 261

Fourth Year:

  • OPT 324, 431
  • One from OPT 101, 362, 400, 442, PHY 262
  • PHY 351, 441, 490

Secondary Physics Education

Physics Majors preparing for a career in education take Physics courses and a series of Education and other courses specified by the Education Department to meet Pennsylvania Department of Education regulations. As early as possible in their college experience, candidates for teacher certification in English should consult the Requirements section of the Education website and the chair of Education regarding specific course requirements. The Physics Education certification is a grades 7-12 program.


Co-Major in Physics
Requirements

  • PHY 201, 202, 203
  • PHY 340, 351
  • PHY 441
  • MAT 131, 132, 233
  • PHY 255 (formerly IDS 255)

Co-Majors in Optical Physics
Requirements

  • PHY 201, 202
  • OPT 241, 261
  • OPT 431
  • Two from OPT 324, 362, 400, 442, PHY 351, 441

A student may combine optics with any other major. However, the high level of computational background required for most optics courses favors combining with mathematics.

The mathematics courses required are:

  • MAT 131, 132
  • MAT 233
  • MAT 250, 334, 435, 438
  • MAT 491

Education at Albright

Albright education students earn teaching certifications while fully exploring more than two dozen major areas of study.

K-12 Certification Programs

Art Education
Foreign Languages

Early Childhood Education (Pre K-4) with co-majors:

Accounting
Art
Arts Administration
Communications
English
Environmental Studies
Family Studies
Fashion
History
Latin American Studies
Mathematics
Music Industry Studies
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies or Philosophy
Spanish
Theatre
Women’s Studies

Secondary Teacher Education (7-12)

Biology
Chemistry
English
French
Latin
Mathematics
Physics
Social Studies: History or Political Science
Spanish

Master’s Degrees & Beyond

Dual bachelor’s and master’s 4+1 degree program
Master or Science/Arts in Special Education (with or without certification)
Master or Science/Arts in Early Childhood General Education (with or without certification)
Master or Science/Arts in Secondary General Education (with or without certification)
Master or Science/Arts in Secondary Special Education (with or without certification)
Post Baccalaureate Teacher Certification


Program Requirements

Education



Teacher Certification Programs at Albright College

Because Albright is a liberal arts college, we offer certification in education but not a degree in education.
If you are a student interested in earning your teacher certification at Albright College and you have questions, please contact someone in the Education Department


Candidates for secondary education, foreign language, or art certifications, must fulfill certification requirements as well as obtain a degree in a content area to be eligible for a certification in one of the content areas below.

Secondary Education Certifications (7th -12th Grade)

  • Biology – Must co-major in Secondary Education and Biology
  • Chemistry, 7-12 – Must co-major in Secondary Education and Chemistry
  • English, 7-12 – Must co-major in Secondary Education and English
  • Mathematics, 7-12 – Must co-major in Secondary Education and Mathematics
  • Physics, 7-12 – Must co-major in Secondary Education and Physics
  • Social Studies, 7-12 – Must co-major in Secondary Education and History or History/Political Science

K-12th Teacher Certifications

  • Art – Must major in Art Education
  • French – Must co-major in Secondary Education and French
  • Spanish – Must co-major in Secondary Education and Spanish

Teacher Certification Requirements

The following are the general requirements for inclusion and retention in all Albright College teacher certification programs culminating in a professional semester that includes student teaching. Specific requirements (minimum GPA, PDE tests, and course requirements) for teacher certification are revised for each entering class. Candidates for Pennsylvania teacher certification must consult with an Education Department adviser for current information regarding specific requirements.

  1. Successful admission into an Albright Teacher Certification Program.
  2. Passing scores on Pennsylvania required basic skills tests and certification tests.
  3. A grade of C or above in all courses associated with teaching certificate. A C- in any of these courses will require the student to repeat the course.
  4. Recommendation of concentration department.
  5. Recommendation of Education Department.
  6. Formal admission to the professional semester by the Albright Teacher Education Committee in accordance with the screening and retention policies for teacher certification programs.
  7. Minimum 3.0 GPA

All certification programs require extensive field and classroom experiences. Albright requires membership in the student organization of the Pennsylvania State Education Association.


PDE Testing Requirements

Basic Skills Assessments

The Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) requires all teacher candidates to show competency in the basic skills of reading, writing, and mathematics.

Albright education students must show competency in the basic skills prior to applying for the certification program at the end of their sophomore year.


As of March 2016, Students may show competency using different test vendors for each basic skill.


ETS’s Praxis Core Academic Skills: Reading, Writing, & Mathematics Tests

http://www.ets.org/praxis/about/core/content

  • Pass scores:

Reading (5712):          156

Writing (5722):           162

Mathematics (5732):   150

OR

  • Achieve a composite score of 475 for all three Praxis Core skills tests, with no scores below the following minimums: Reading 148, Math 142, and Writing 158

Pearson’s PAPA (Pre-service Academic Performance Assessment): Reading, Mathematics, & Writing Modules                                                                                              http://www.pa.nesinc.com

  • Achieve a passing score of 220 or above on each of the three modules

OR

  • Achieve a composite score of 686 for all three modules, with no scores below the following minimums: Reading 193, Math 197, and Writing 192

SAT (Scholastic Achievement Test)*                                               Taken prior to college enrollment.

A SAT score 500 or higher on each individual section (Critical Reading, Writing, and Mathematics).

ACT+ Writing (American College Test Plus Writing)*                Taken prior to college enrollment.

  • Tests taken prior to September 2015 require a composite score of 23 accompanied by a combined English/Writing score of 22 or higher and a Math score of 21 or higher.
  • Tests taken after September 2015 require separate scores of Reading – 22; Mathematics – 21; and Writing – 21.

*Prior to teacher certification, the student must provide official SAT and/or ACT test scores in an envelope sealed by the test vendor.  This sealed envelope should be given to the Albright Certification Officer.


Curriculum Requirements by Program

ART EDUCATION CERTIFICATION

The Art Education certification is a grades K-12 program.

Art courses  (10)

  • ART 101 Drawing
  • ART 103 Design
  • ART 104 Survey of Art History
  • 100- or 200-level Art History course
  • ART 112 Painting
  • ART 113 Sculpture I
  • ART 114 Printmaking
  • ART 212 Painting II or ART 213 Sculpture II
  • ART 265 Computer Graphics
  • ART 400 Studio Topics

Professional courses  (12)

  • EDU 202 Theories & Practices
  • EDU 230 Communication Skills for Teachers
  • EDU 347 ELL Strategies for the Adolescent
  • EDU 350 Educational Technology
  • EDU 440 Teacher as Researcher: Data-Driven Instruction
  • ART/EDU 337 Teaching Arts in the Elementary School and lab
  • ART/EDU 338 Teaching Arts in the Secondary School and lab
  • SPE 340 Inclusive Practice
  • SPE 341 Adolescents with Special Needs
  • Professional semester
    • EDU 403 Professional Seminar
    • EDU 411 Elementary Art Student Teaching
    • EDU 412 Secondary Art Student Teaching

Courses required for Pennsylvania certification  (6)

  • English (2 units)
    • Literature
    • ENG 102 Composition II (prerequisite ENG 101 or placement)
  • Mathematics (2 units)
  • PSY 100 General Psychology
  • PSY 230 Human Development

SECONDARY BIOLOGY EDUCATION

The Biology Education certification is a grades 7-12 program.

Biology & Related Science Courses (14)

  • BIO 201 General Biology I
  • BIO 202 General Biology II
  • BIO 203 General Biology III
  • BIO 311 Ecology
  • BIO 314 Botany
  • BIO 321 Bacteriology
  • BIO 330 Anatomy & Physiology II
  • 400-level Biology course
  • EVS 205 Geology
  • PHY 201 General Physics I
  • CHE 105 General Analytical Chemistry I
  • CHE 106 General Analytical Chemistry II
  • CHE 207 Organic Chemistry I
  • CHE 208 Organic Chemistry II

Professional courses  (12)

  • EDU 202 Theories & Practices
  • EDU 230 Communication Skills for Teachers
  • EDU 345 Secondary Methods I and lab
  • EDU 346 Secondary Methods II and lab
  • EDU 347 ELL Strategies for the Adolescent
  • EDU 350 Educational Technology
  • EDU 440 Teacher as Researcher: Data-Driven Instruction
  • SPE 340 Inclusive Practice
  • SPE 341 Adolescents with Special Needs
  • Professional semester
    • EDU 403 Professional Seminar
    • EDU 407 Secondary Student Teaching
    • EDU 408 Secondary Student Teaching

Courses required for Pennsylvania certification  (6)

  • English (2 units)
    • Literature
    • ENG 102 Composition II (prerequisite ENG 101 or placement)
  • Mathematics (2 units)
    • Calculus & Analytic Geometry I
    • Pre-Calculus, Statistics, or Calculus & Analytic Geometry II
  • PSY 100 General Psychology
  • PSY 230 Human Development

SECONDARY CHEMISTRY EDUCATION

The Chemistry Education certification is a grades 7-12 program.

Chemistry and Related Science Courses (12)

  • CHE 105 General Analytical Chemistry I
  • CHE 106 General Analytical Chemistry II
  • CHE 207 Organic Chemistry I
  • CHE 208 Organic Chemistry II
  • CHE 321 Physical Chemistry I
  • CHE 322 Physical Chemistry II
  • CHE 323 Instrumental Analysis
  • CHE 325 Biochemistry I
  • CHE 324 Inorganic Chemistry
  • CHE 470 Advanced Topics in Chemistry Education
  • PHY 201 General Physics I
  • PHY 202 General Physics II

Professional courses  (12)

  • EDU 202 Theories & Practices
  • EDU 230 Communication Skills for Teachers
  • EDU 345 Secondary Methods I and lab
  • EDU 346 Secondary Methods II and lab
  • EDU 347 ELL Strategies for the Adolescent
  • EDU 350 Educational Technology
  • EDU 440 Teacher as Researcher: Data-Driven Instruction
  • SPE 340 Inclusive Practice
  • SPE 341 Adolescents with Special Needs
  • Professional semester
    • EDU 403 Professional Seminar
    • EDU 407 Secondary Student Teaching
    • EDU 408 Secondary Student Teaching

Courses required for Pennsylvania certification  (6)

  • English (2 units)
    • Literature
    • ENG 102 Composition II (prerequisite ENG 101 or placement)
  • Mathematics (2 units)
    • MAT 131 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I
    • MAT 132 Calculus & Analytic Geometry II
  • PSY 100 General Psychology
  • PSY 230 Human Development

SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION

The English Education certification is a grades 7-12 program.

English Courses (12)

  • ENG 201 British Texts to 1780
  • ENG 202 British Texts 1780 to Present
  • ENG 204 Survey of American Literature
  • ENG 226 Grammar
  • 2 American Literature courses
  • 2 300-level English courses not in American literature
  • ENG 399 Seminar on Theory and Methods
  • ENG 301 History of the English Language
  • ENG 354 Shakespeare
  • ENG 491 Senior Seminar

Professional courses  (12)

  • EDU 202 Theories & Practices
  • EDU 230 Communication Skills for Teachers
  • EDU 345 Secondary Methods I and lab
  • EDU 346 Secondary Methods II and lab
  • EDU 347 ELL Strategies for the Adolescent
  • EDU 350 Educational Technology
  • EDU 440 Teacher as Researcher: Data-Driven Instruction
  • SPE 340 Inclusive Practice
  • SPE 341 Adolescents with Special Needs
  • Professional semester
    • EDU 403 Professional Seminar
    • EDU 407 Secondary Student Teaching
    • EDU 408 Secondary Student Teaching

Courses required for Pennsylvania certification  (6)

  • English (2 units)
    • ENG 102 Composition II (prerequisite ENG 101 or placement)
    • ENG 234 Adolescent Literature
  • Mathematics (2 units)
  • PSY 100 General Psychology
  • PSY 230 Human Development

SECONDARY MATHEMATICS EDUCATION

The Mathematics Education certification is a grades 7-12 program.

Mathematics and related courses (11)

  • MAT 233 Calculus & Analytic Geometry III
  • MAT 250 Foundations of Mathematics
  • MAT 310 Probability and Statistics
  • MAT 320 Linear Algebra
  • MAT 325 Abstract Algebra
  • MAT 334 Differential Equations or MAT 360 Numerical Methods
  • MAT 340 Geometry
  • MAT 431 Real Analysis
  • MAT 491 Seminar I
  • Math elective (300 or 400 level)
  • PHY 201 General Physics I

Professional courses  (12)

  • EDU 202 Theories & Practices
  • EDU 230 Communication Skills for Teachers
  • EDU 345 Secondary Methods I and lab
  • EDU 346 Secondary Methods II and lab
  • EDU 347 ELL Strategies for the Adolescent
  • EDU 350 Educational Technology
  • EDU 440 Teacher as Researcher: Data-Driven Instruction
  • SPE 340 Inclusive Practice
  • SPE 341 Adolescents with Special Needs
  • Professional semester
    • EDU 403 Professional Seminar
    • EDU 407 Secondary Student Teaching
    • EDU 408 Secondary Student Teaching

Courses required for Pennsylvania certification  (6)

  • English (2 units)
    • Literature
    • ENG 102 Composition II (prerequisite ENG 101 or placement)
  • Mathematics (2 units)
    • MAT 131 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I
    • MAT 132 Calculus & Analytic Geometry II
  • PSY 100 General Psychology
  • PSY 230 Human Development

SECONDARY PHYSICS EDUCATION

The Physics Education certification is a grades 7-12 program.

Physics and related math courses (13)

  • PHY 201 General Physics I
  • PHY 202 General Physics II
  • PHY 203 General Physics III
  • PHY 251 Thermodynamics & Statistical Physics
  • PHY 262 Electronics
  • PHY 340 Classical Mechanics
  • PHY 351 Electromagnetism I
  • PHY 431 Advanced Physics Lab I
  • PHY 441 Quantum Physics I
  • PHY 490 Senior Seminar
  • MAT 233 Calculus III
  • MAT 255 Math for Chemistry & Physics
  • MAT 334 Differential Equations

Professional courses  (12)

  • EDU 202 Theories & Practices
  • EDU 230 Communication Skills for Teachers
  • EDU 345 Secondary Methods I and lab
  • EDU 346 Secondary Methods II and lab
  • EDU 347 ELL Strategies for the Adolescent
  • EDU 350 Educational Technology
  • EDU 440 Teacher as Researcher: Data-Driven Instruction
  • SPE 340 Inclusive Practice
  • SPE 341 Adolescents with Special Needs
  • Professional semester
    • EDU 403 Professional Seminar
    • EDU 407 Secondary Student Teaching
    • EDU 408 Secondary Student Teaching

Courses required for Pennsylvania certification  (6)

  • English (2 units)
    • Literature
    • ENG 102 Composition II (prerequisite ENG 101 or placement)
  • Mathematics (2 units)
    • MAT 131 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I
    • MAT 132 Calculus & Analytic Geometry II
  • PSY 100 General Psychology
  • PSY 230 Human Development

SECONDARY SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION

The Social Studies Education certification is a grades 7-12 program.

Social Studies courses (History Major)  (14)

  • World history– HIS 101, 122, 135, 136, or 137
  • American history — HIS 151, 152, or 153
  • 2 more American history at the 200/300 level
  • 2 European history at the 200/300 level
  • 1 African, Asian, or Latin American history
  • HIS 216 Keystone: Pennsylvania in the Wider World
  • POL 101 American Government
  • POL 240 Geography
  • SOC 201 Social Problems
  • Economics: ECO 100, 105, or 195
  • HIS 493 Seminar I
  • HIS 494 Seminar II

– OR –

Social Studies courses (History Major & Political Science Minor) (18)

  • World history — HIS 101, 122, 135, 136, or 137
  • American history — HIS 151, 152, or 153
  • 2 more American history at the 200/300 level
  • 2 European history at the 200/300 level
  • 1 African, Asian, or Latin American history
  • HIS 216 Keystone: Pennsylvania in the Wider World
  • POL 101 American Government
  • POL 202 International Relations or POL 205 Comparative Politics
  • POL 207 Research Methods
  • POL 240 Geography
  • One POL elective
  • Sociology: SOC 201 Social Problems or SOC 262 Social Stratification
  • Economics: ECO 100, 105 or 195
  • POL Senior Seminar
  • HIS 493 Seminar I
  • HIS 494 Seminar II

Professional courses  (12)

  • EDU 202 Theories & Practices
  • EDU 230 Communication Skills for Teachers
  • EDU 345 Secondary Methods I and lab
  • EDU 346 Secondary Methods II and lab
  • EDU 347 ELL Strategies for the Adolescent
  • EDU 350 Educational Technology
  • EDU 440 Teacher as Researcher: Data-Driven Instruction
  • SPE 340 Inclusive Practice
  • SPE 341 Adolescents with Special Needs
  • Professional semester
    • EDU 403 Professional Seminar
    • EDU 407 Secondary Student Teaching
    • EDU 408 Secondary Student Teaching

Courses required for Pennsylvania certification  (6)

  • English (2 units)
    • Literature
    • ENG 102 Composition II. (prerequisite ENG 101 or placement)
  • Mathematics (2 units)
  • PSY 100 General Psychology
  • PSY 230 Human Development

FOREIGN/WORLD LANGUAGES EDUCATION

The Foreign/World Languages Education certification is a grades PK-12 program.

French courses  (11)

  • FRE 202 Intermediate French II (requires FRE 201 or placement into FRE 202)
  • FRE 301 Advanced French I
  • FRE 302 Advanced French II
  • French 300-level literature course
  • Five French 300-level content courses
  • FRE 371 Applied Linguistics
  • FRE 492 Seminar
  • Semester study abroad strongly recommended
  • European history/culture course recommended

– OR –

Spanish courses (11)

  • SPA 202/204 Intermediate Spanish II (requires SPA 201/203 or placement into SPA 202/204)
  • SPA 301 Advanced Composition & Conversation I
  • SPA 302 Advanced Composition & Conversation II
  • Spanish 300-level literature course
  • Five Spanish 300-level content courses
  • SPA 371 Applied Linguistics
  • SPA 492 Seminar
  • Semester study abroad strongly recommended
  • Latin American Studies course recommended

– OR –

Latin courses (9)

  • LAT 101 Elementary Latin I
  • LAT 102 Elementary Latin II
  • LAT 201 Intermediate Latin
  • LAT 202 Latin Literature of Golden Age
  • LAT 301 Advanced Latin Prose
  • LAT 302 Advanced Latin Poetry
  • LAT 401 Selected Topics
  • HIS 101 Early Civilizations
  • ART 105 Ancient & Medieval Art or PHI 210 Greek & Medieval Philosophy or ENG 270 The Classical Heritage

Professional courses  (12)

  • EDU 202 Theories & Practices
  • EDU 230 Communication Skills for Teachers
  • EDU 345 Secondary Methods I and lab
  • EDU 346 Secondary Methods II and lab
  • EDU 347 ELL Strategies for the Adolescent
  • EDU 350 Educational Technology
  • EDU 440 Teacher as Researcher: Data-Driven Instruction
  • SPE 340 Inclusive Practice
  • SPE 341 Adolescents with Special Needs
  • Professional semester
    • EDU 403 Professional Seminar
    • EDU 407 Secondary Student Teaching
    • EDU 408 Secondary Student Teaching

Courses required for Pennsylvania certification  (6)

  • English (2 units)
    • Literature
    • ENG 102 Composition II. (prerequisite ENG 101 or placement)
  • Mathematics (2 units)
  • PSY 100 General Psychology
  • PSY 230 Human Development

Fashion & Costume at Albright

Named one of the top fashion programs in the country, Albright’s hands-on instruction ensures graduates are skilled in technology and ready to take on the fast-paced industry.

Programs

Costume Design
Design and Merchandising
Fashion Design
Fashion Merchandising

Earn a Fashion Merchandising degree in three years

New York Fashion Week 2021


Program Requirements

Fashion and Costume


The Fashion Department offers the following majors:

  • Design and Merchandising
  • Fashion Merchandising
  • Fashion Design
  • Costume Design
  • Combine Major in Fashion

These areas possess a commonality of mission and provide you with a curriculum that addresses issues of creative research and development, design, manufacturing, marketing and the consumerism of textiles and apparel products.

Students majoring in fashion must complete the core requirements and the requirements for one of the tracks.

Core Requirements

  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS283 Fashion History
  • FAS482 Internship

Track Requirements
Design and Merchandising

  • ACC101 Accounting(General Studies Math)
  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals (with lab)
  • FAS208 Fashion Business
  • FAS225 CAD
  • FAS230 Fashion Illustration
  • FAS284 Intermediate Construction
  • FAS372 Concept Development
  • BUS247 Marketing Management
  • FAS490 Senior Seminar(Design OR Merchandising)
  • Two of the following:
    • FAS218 Visual Merchandising
    • FAS210 Fashion Product Develop.
    • FAS376 Retailing
    • FAS315 Fashion Merch. Communications
    • FAS309 Lifestyle Marketing
    • FAS342 Patternmaking
    • FAS340 Draping
    • FAS345 Electronic Patternmaking
    • BUS365 Entrepreneurship
    • BUS374 International Marketing

* Students should choose one track for their internship and the other track for their senior seminar.

Fashion Merchandising

  • ECO105 Economics(General Studies Soc. Sci.)
  • ACC101 Accounting(General Studies Math)
  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals (with lab)
  • FAS208 Fashion Business
  • FAS210 Fashion Product Development
  • FAS376 Retailing
  • FAS315 Fashion Communications
  • FAS309 Lifestyle Marketing
  • BUS247 Marketing Management
  • FAS490C Senior Seminar, Merch.
  • One of the following:
    • FAS218 Visual Merchandising
    • BUS365 Entrepreneurship
    • BUS246 Management Principles
    • BUS374 International Marketing

Fashion Design

  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals (with lab)
  • FAS225 CAD I
  • FAS230 Fashion Illustration
  • FAS284 Intermediate Construction
  • FAS340 Draping
  • FAS342 Patternmaking
  • FAS350 Advanced Construction
  • FAS372 Concept Dev, Fashion Design
  • FAS3XX 300 Level Design Special Topics
  • FAS490A Senior Seminar Design

Costume Design

  • THR101 Creative Process (General Studies ART)
  • THR201 Production Experience
  • THR210 Design Fundamentals
  • FAS/THR220 Costume Construction
  • FAS230 Design & Illustration
  • THR288 Great Ages of Theater I OR THR289 Great Ages of Theater II
  • THR/FAS320 Stage Costuming
  • FAS225 CAD
  • FAS340 Draping
  • FAS342 Patternmaking
  • FAS490C Senior Seminar Costume Design
  • Suggested Elective: THR214 Stage Make Up

Combined Major

The following requirements are for students matriculating Fall 2018 and after. Students who matriculated before Fall 2018 see the requirements below.

  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals
  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS283 Fashion History
  • FAS49 Seminar Design or Merchandising
  • ECO105 Economics OR ART103 Design I (captured Gen Ed.)
  • Two of the following:
    • FAS208 Fashion Business
    • FAS210 Fashion Product Development
    • FAS218 Visual Merchandising
    • FAS225 CAD
    • FAS230 Fashion Illustration
    • FAS340 Draping
    • FAS342 Patternmaking
    • FAS315 Fashion Merchandising Communications
    • FAS376 Retailing

The following requirements are for students matriculating before Fall 2018.

Combined Majors
Fashion Merchandising Combined Major

  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals
  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS203 Fashion History I (Prehistoric-18th Century) OR FAS204 Fashion History II (19th- 21st Century)
  • FAS490C Senior Seminar in Merchandising
  • ECO105 Economics (General Studies Foundations Social Science) OR ACC101 Accounting (General Studies Foundations Quantitative)
  • Select two of the following:
    • FAS208 Fashion Business
    • FAS218 Visual Merchandising
    • FAS210 Product Development
    • FAS376 Retailing
    • FAS309 Lifestyle Marketing
    • FAS315 Fashion Communications
    • BUS347 Marketing Management
    • BUS365 Small Business Management

Fashion Design Combined Major 

  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals
  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS203 Fashion History I (Prehistoric-18th Century) OR FAS204 Fashion History II (19th-21st Century)
  • FAS490A Senior Seminar in Design
  • ART102 Life Drawing
  • Select two of the following:
    • FAS230 Design and Illustration
    • FAS244 Patternmaking/Draping
    • FAS325 CAD
    • FAS372 Concept Development, Fashion Design
    • FAS350 Advanced Construction
    • FAS355 Brand Development

Costume Design Combined Major 

  • FAS220 Costume Construction
  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS203 Fashion History I (prehistoric-18th Century) OR FAS204 Fashion History II (19th-21st Century)
  • FAS490B Senior Seminar in Costume
  • THR101 Creative Process (General Studies Foundations Fine Arts)
  • Select two of the following:
    • FAS230 Design and Illustration
    • FAS244 Patternmaking/Draping
    • FAS325 CAD
    • FAS320 Stage Costuming
    • THR201 Production Experience (four productions)
    • THR288 Great Ages of Theatre I or THR289 Great Ages of Theatre II

History & Cultural Studies at Albright

Dive deeply into the study of human society and social relationships at Albright College in order to positively shape tomorrow’s landscape — whether it be in a Kindergarten classroom, a city courtroom or a corporate boardroom.

Programs

Africana Studies
American Civilization
Anthropology
Asian Studies
Child and Family Studies
Crime and Justice

Criminology
Environmental Studies
European Studies
Evolutionary Studies
Family Studies
Health Psychology
History
Holocaust Studies
Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Medieval & Renaissance Studies
Philosophy
Political Science
Public Health
Religious Studies
Sociology
Urban Affairs
Women’s and Gender Studies


Program Requirements

Africana Studies


  • One introductory course from HIS 211 “African History” or PHI 218 “African Philosophy” (other introductory courses may be approved by the program coordinators)
  • Three Africana studies content courses from at least two disciplines.
  • One 300- or 400-level advanced course that involves studying in depth an Africana topic or author.

American Civilization


  • Two lower level courses from HIS 151, 152, 153, 212, 216 or 240
  • Two upper level courses from HIS 311, 312 or 322
  • Four courses from ENG 210, 380, 384, 385, 386, THR 388 or certain sections of ENG 235 (consult with Professor Pankratz)
  • One from Philosophy or Religious Studies
  • One additional course: ART 107; ECO 105, 335, or 336; PHI 216; POL 101, 210, 231/331, 322 or 334; REL 261 or 262; or SPA 308

American Civilization Majors with an emphasis in Literature:

  • ENG 399 or 491

American Civilization Majors with an emphasis in History:

  • HIS 493

American Civilization Majors interested in historical museum studies should take HIS 311 or 312 and complete a supervised internship at either the Landis Valley Farm Museum near Lancaster or the William Penn Museum in Harrisburg.

Students interested in this major should consult Professor Pankratz in the History Department.

Asian Studies


Requirements:

  • One introductory course – REL 266 “Asian Cultural Life”
  • Three Asian Studies content courses from three different departments
  • One course with a research module, either:
    • Within an Asian studies course
    • An independent research with a faculty member in the Asian studies curriculum
    • In a special topics or senior seminar course approved by the Asian Studies coordinator

Students in the Asian Studies minor are encouraged to take Chinese at Albright or Chinese or another Asian language at another institution.

Child and Family Studies


Full Course List for Child and Family Studies Major

  • Complete Core Research Methods and Statistics sequence and Senior Seminar (PSY200 or SOC211 fulfills GS quantitative requirement)
    • SOC 210 (Research Methods) & SOC211 (Statistics) & SOC490 (Senior Seminar) OR
    • PSY 200 (Research Design & Analysis I) & PSY201 (Research Design & Analysis II) & PSY405/406 (Senior Seminar)

Psychology Requirements

  • Core Psychology requirement:
    • PSY 100: Introductory Psychology
  • Developmental Psychology Requirement
    • PSY230 (Lifespan Development) or PSY240 (Child Development)
  • One from Group I (Social, Developmental, and Clinical Approaches):
    • PSY206: Social Psychology
    • PSY210: Health Psychology
    • PSY250: Personality
    • PSY390: Adult Psychopathology
    • PSY391: Child Psychopathology
  • One from Group II (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Approaches):
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
  • One from Group III (Child-Focused Elective courses):
    • PSY345: Language Development
    • PSY346: Social Development
    • PSY347: Adolescent Development
  • Psychology Elective: Any additional psychology course not previously taken

 

Sociology Requirements

  • All of the following core requirements:
    • SOC 101: Intro
    • SOC 213: Social Theory
  • Additional specialized family course requirement:
    • SOC 261: The Family
  • One of the following lower level specialized courses:
    • SOC 203: Human Services
    • SOC 270:  Parenting and Technology
    • SOC 271:  Work & Family Conflict
  • Two of the following intermediate specialized courses:
    • SOC 302: Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 311: Domestic Violence
    • ANT 320: Sex, Gender, Culture
  • The following advanced application courses:
    • SOC 470: Immigration & Transnat’l Families

Crime and Justice


Requirements:

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
    (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science requirement)
  • SOC 202 The Criminal Justice System
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning requirement)
    • May take PSY 200 Research Methods I and PSY 201 Research Methods II in place of SOC 210 and 211
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 251 Crime and Deviance
  • Any two of the following:
    – SOC 253 Criminal Investigation and SOC 254 Advanced Criminal Investigation (must take both courses)
    – ANT 310 Crime, Culture and Conflict Resolution
    – SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    – SOC 305 Terrorism
    – SOC 307 Organized Crime
    – SOC 309 Criminal Corrections
    – SOC 311 Domestic Violence
    – SOC 360 Crime & the Media
    – SOC 385 Violence & Victims
  • One of the following:
    – SOC 440 Ethnographics in Crime
    – SOC 450 White Collar Crime
    – SOC 460 Serial Murder
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • POL 101 American Government
  • POL 400-level Senior Seminar in Political Science
  • Two of the following:
    – POL 214 Public Policy
    – POL 216 Law & Society
    – POL 218 Public Administration
    – POL 231/331 Criminal Law
    – POL 310 Metropolitan Politics
  • PSY 100 General Psychology
  • Two of the following:
    – PSY 206 Social Psychology
    – PSY 220 Theories/Treatment of Addictive Behaviors
    – PSY 230 Human Development
    – PSY 240 Child Development
    – PSY 250 Theories of Personality
    – PSY 355 Motivation
    – PSY 390 Adult Psychopathology and Behavior Disorders
    – PSY 391 Child Psychopathology and Behavior Disorders
  • POL 205 Comparative Politics or PSY 291 Cross Cultural Psychology of SOC262 Social Stratification

Criminology


There are numerous rigorous academic requirements for a degree in criminology because the degree trains students to evaluate and assess very complex phenomena and make assessments with incomplete information. Students must develop skills in analysis, organization, research design and interpretation, abstract thinking, technology/computers, oral/written communication, statistics and the interpersonal skills that facilitate teamwork, multicultural sensitivity and understanding.

  • 101 Introduction to Sociology
  • 210 Research Methods
  • 211 Statistics
  • 213 Social Theory
  • 490 Senior Seminar
  • 251 Crime & Deviance
  • 202 The Criminal Justice System
  • 382/482 Internship, travel abroad course, or a 300-level or above approved substitution
  • Two of the following:
    • ANT101 Intro to Cultural Anthropology
    • 201 Social Problems
    • 230 Cultural Sociology
    • 231 Cults & New Religious Movements
    • 262 Social Stratification.
  • Four of the following:
    • 253 Criminal Investigation and SOC 254 Advanced Criminal Investigation (must take both courses to satisfy one of the requirements from this list)
    • 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    • 305 Terrorism
    • SOC/LAS 307 Organized Crime
    • 309 Crim. Corrections
    • ANT 310 Crime, Culture, Conflict Resolution
    • 311 Domestic Violence
    • 360 Crime and the Media
    • 385 Violence & Victims
  • One of the following:
    • 440 Ethnographies in Crime and Deviance
    • 450 White-Collar Crime
    • 460 Serial Murder

Study abroad courses are also encouraged as electives.

Environmental Studies


Major in Environmental Studies

Required Courses (Only one course, beyond the Quantitative Reasoning Statistics course, can be counted toward General Studies Foundations requirements)

All of the following core courses

  • ESS 101 Introduction to Environmental Issues
  • ESS 400 Environment Seminar
  • ECO 224 Environmental Economics
  • POL 321 Environment Policy
  • ANT 365 Ecological Psychology
  • SOC 291 Environmenal Sociology
  • ESS 325 GIS

One general course:

  • ANT 101 Introduction to Anthropology
  • ANT 285 The Human Animal
  • ANT 303 Food & Cultural

One environmental science course:

  • BIO 152 General Biology II
  • BIO 211 Ecology
  • BIO 214 Botany and Plant Taxology
  • BIO 246 Conservation Biology
  • ESS 205 Physical Geology
  • ESS 310 Pollution
  • ESS 315 Watersheds
  • SPP J51 Protecting Endangered Species: Hawaiian Humpback Whale

One humanities course:

  • HIS 280 Ecological History
  • PHI 270 Environmental Ethics
  • REL 280/SYN 380 Religion & the Environment

One additional course from either the environmental science group or humanities group above.

One experiential learning course:

  • ESS 280 Martinique Studies
  • ESS 282 or POS 399 Internship
  • ESS 298 Ecological & Anthropological Methods in Peru (if not taken as methods course)
  • SPP J51 Protecting Endangered Species: Hawaiian Humpback Whale

Another off-campus experience, independent study or internship that relates to environmental issues and that is approved by an affiliated instructor or an additional course approved by the director of the Environmental Studies Program.

One statistics course  (satisfies General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning requirement):

  • ECO 207 Economics Statistics
  • MAT 110 Elementary Statistics
  • POL 207 Research Methods
  • PSY 200 Research Design I (must be taken in combination with PSY 201)
  • SOC 211 Social Statistics

One methods course:

  • ESS 298 Ecological & Anthropological Methods in Peru
  • PSY 201 Research Design II (must be taken in combination with PSY 200)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods

Combined Major in Environmental Studies

Required Courses:

  • ESS 101 Introduction to Environmental Issues
  • ESS 400 Environment Seminar
  • ECO 224 Environmental Economics
  • POL 321 Environmental Policy
  • ANT 365 Ecological Psychology
  • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
  • ESS 325 GIS

One of the following courses:

  • HIS 280 Ecological History
  • PHI 270 Environmental Ethics
  • REL 280/SYN 380 Religion & the Environment
  • ANT 303 Food & Culture

One statistics course (satisfies the General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning requirement):

  • ECO 207 Economics Statistics
  • POL 207 Research Methods
  • PSY 200 Research Design I (must be taken in combination with PSY 201)
  • SOC 211 Social Statistics
  • MAT110 Elementary Statistics

It is recommended that students take one of the following science courses to satisfy the general studies natural science requirement:

  • BIO 152 General Biology II
  • ESS 205 Geology
  • SPP J51 Protecting Endangered Species: Hawaiian Humpback Whale

Students interested in environmental studies should contact Professor Barty Thompson, Director or Professor Brian Jennings.

Evolutionary Studies


  • PSY 100: General Psychology
  • BIO 203: Genetics or BIO 152 General Biology II: Systematics, Ecology and Evolution
  • Two of the following:
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • BIO 220: Evolution
    • ANT 342: Human Evolution
  • One of the following:
    • PSY 319, BIO 220 or ANT 342 (if not already taken from course 3 & 4 options)
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
    • PSY 265/ANT 265: Ecological Psychology
    • BIO 319: Vertebrate Natural History
    • BIO 331: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
    • BIO 494: Mammalian Evolution
    • ANT 285: The Human Animal
    • ANT 320: Sex/Gender/Culture
    • PHI 140: Human Nature
  • Additional courses: If special Seminars or Special Topics classes arise that may be pertinent to this program, students may petition their advisors to have other courses count toward this program.
  • Includes opportunities for Independent Study and involvement in faculty research to fulfill program requirements.

Family Studies


SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
SOC 210 Research Methods
SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Quantitative Reasoning course)
SOC 213 Social Theory
SOC 490 Senior Seminar
SOC 203 Human Services for Families and Children
SOC 261 The Family
SOC 270 Parenting & Technology or SOC 271 Work & Family Conflict
SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
SOC 311 Domestic Violence
ANT 320 Sex, Gender, & Culture
SOC 382/482 Internship, travel abroad course, or a 400-level approved substitution
Two of the following:
SOC 201 Social Problems
SOC 230 Cultural Sociology
SOC 251 Crime & Deviance
SOC 262 Social Stratification
SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
ANT 101 Introduction to Anthropology
ANT 285 The Human Animal
One of the following:
SOC 470 Immigration & Transnational Families

Combined Family Studies Major

Requirements

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
SOC 210 Research Methods
SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Quantitative Reasoning course)
SOC 213 Social Theory
SOC 490 Senior Seminar
SOC 261 The Family
One of the following intermediate courses:
SOC 203 Human Services for Families and Children
SOC 270 Parenting & Technology
SOC 271 Work and Family Conflict
SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
SOC 311 Domestic Violence
SOC ANT 320 Sex, Gender, & Culture
One of the following advanced application courses:
SOC 470 Immigration & Transnational Families

Students are also encouraged to complete an internship as an elective.

History


Major in History

BASIC REQUIREMENTS
One course from World and European History
HIS 101  Ancient Mediterranean World
HIS 122  Medieval & Early Modern Civilization
HIS 135  World History I:  Foundations of World Civilization
HIS 136  World History II:  Making of the Modern World
HIS 137  20th Century World History

One course from United States History
HIS 151  United States 1585-1800
HIS 152  United States in the 19th Century
HIS 153  United States Since 1865

AREA REQUIREMENTS (at least two must be 300-level courses)

Two courses from European History
HIS 232  Russia & the Soviet Union
HIS 240  Heroes & Villains*
HIS 251  History of England I
HIS 252  History of England II
HIS 261  Renaissance
HIS 262  Reformation
HIS 266  19th Century Europe
HIS 267  20th Century Europe
HIS 275  Women’s Work*
HIS 283  Topics in European History
HIS 315  World War II Era*
HIS 345 Sex and Society in Early Modern Europe
HIS 361  The Early Middle Ages (500-1000) (Medieval History I)
HIS 362  The Later Middle Ages (1000-1500) (Medieval History II)
HIS 370  Early Modern Europe
HIS 373  The Holocaust *
HIS 374  Germany since 1800
HIS 375  France since 1789
HIS 383  Advanced Topics in European History

Two courses from United States History
HIS 202  History of Race & Ethnicity in the US
HIS 204  US Women’s History
HIS 205  History of US Medicine
HIS 207  History of US Popular Culture
HIS 208  American Indian History
HIS 212  African-American History
HIS 215  US & Latin America
HIS 216  Pennsylvania
HIS 240  Heroes & Villains*
HIS 272  History of US Foreign Relations
HIS 275  Women’s Work*
HIS 280  Living on Earth
HIS 283  Topics in US History
HIS 310  History of the US West
HIS 311  US Social History
HIS 312  US Economic History
HIS 315  World War II Era*
HIS 322  City in American History
HIS 373  The Holocaust *
HIS 383  Advanced Topics in US History

Two courses from World History
HIS 211  African History
HIS 215  US & Latin America
HIS 220  History of the Caribbean
HIS 221  Ancient Cultures of Latin America
HIS 224  Latin American History
HIS 228  Dictators & Revolutionaries
HIS 236 Magic in World History
HIS 237  Gender, Women, Power in the Global South
HIS 240  Heroes & Villains*
HIS 241  East Asia to 1800
HIS 242  East Asia from 1800
HIS 254  Middle East 500-1500
HIS 255  Middle East 1500-1900
HIS 256  Modern Middle East
HIS 275  Women’s Work*
HIS 277  History of the Family in Latin America
HIS 283  Topics in World History
HIS 315  World War II Era*
HIS 330  Mexico
HIS 340  Women & Gender in Latin America
HIS 352  African Diaspora
HIS 373  The Holocaust *
HIS 380  Modern India
HIS 383  Advanced Topics in World History

*These courses can count for any Area requirement

SEMINARS

Two different Seminars

HIS 493  US History Seminar
HIS 494  European History Seminar
HIS 495  World History Seminar

RELATED COURSES

Three History courses or History Department approved related courses from Art History, Education, Economics, Political Science, Philosophy, Sociology or Religious Studies.

For History Majors, a History course may not count for both History Major credit and General Studies Humanities credit.


Combined Major in History

REQUIREMENTS:

BASIC REQUIREMENTS

One course from World and European History
HIS 101  Ancient Mediterranean World
HIS 122  Medieval & Early Modern Civilization
HIS 135  World History I:  Foundations of World Civilization
HIS 136  World History II:  Making of the Modern World
HIS 137  20th Century World History

One course from United States History
HIS 151  United States 1585-1800
HIS 152  United States in the 19th Century
HIS 153  United States Since 1865
AREA REQUIREMENTS (at least one must be 300-level courses)

One course from European History
HIS 232  Russia & the Soviet Union
HIS 251  History of England I
HIS 252  History of England II
HIS 261  Renaissance
HIS 262  Reformation
HIS 266  19th Century Europe
HIS 267  20th Century Europe
HIS 283  Topics in European History
HIS 345  Sex and Society in Early Modern Europe
HIS 361  The Early Middle Ages (500-1000) (Medieval History I)
HIS 362  The Later Middle Ages (1000-1500) (Medieval History II)
HIS 370  Early Modern Europe
HIS 373  The Holocaust *
HIS 374  Germany since 1800
HIS 375  France since 1789
HIS 383  Advanced Topics in European History

One course from United States History
HIS 202  History of Race & Ethnicity in the US
HIS 204  US Women’s History
HIS 205  History of US Medicine
HIS 207  History of US Popular Culture
HIS 208  American Indian History
HIS 210  US Working Class History
HIS 212  African-American History
HIS 215  US & Latin America
HIS 216  Pennsylvania
HIS 240  Heroes & Villains*
HIS 275  Women’s Work*
HIS 280  Living on Earth
HIS 283  Topics in US History
HIS 310  History of the US West
HIS 311  US Social History
HIS 312  US Economic History
HIS 315  World War II Era*
HIS 322  City in American History
HIS 383  Advanced Topics in US History

One courses from World History
HIS 211  African History
HIS 215  US & Latin America
HIS 220  History of the Caribbean
HIS 221  Ancient Cultures of Latin America
HIS 224  Latin American History
HIS 228  Dictators & Revolutionaries
HIS 236 Magic in World History
HIS 237  Gender, Women, Power in the Global South
HIS 241  East Asia to 1800
HIS 242  East Asia from 1800
HIS 254  Middle East 500-1500
HIS 255  Middle East 1500-1900
HIS 256  Modern Middle East
HIS 277  History of the Family in Latin America
HIS 283  Topics in World History
HIS 330 Mexico
HIS 340  Women & Gender in Latin America
HIS 352  African Diaspora
HIS 380  Modern India
HIS 383  Advanced Topics in World History

*These courses can count for any Area requirement

ELECTIVE

One History course at the 200 or 300 level

SEMINAR

One Seminar
HIS 493  US History Seminar
HIS 494  European History Seminar
HIS 495  World History Seminar

For history combined majors, a History course may not count for both History Major credit and General Studies Humanities credit.


Interdisciplinary Major in American Civilization

The Major in American Civilization offers a framework for those students who wish to take an interdisciplinary approach to American culture. As it developed in the years following World War II, the American studies movement here and abroad included literary scholars who gave new weight to the historical context of the texts they read, as well as historians eager to move beyond the main lines of political and economic historiography into other fields of endeavor and forms of expression.

To these early forays were added contributions of art historians and musicologists, folklorists and specialists in material culture. This mix of disciplines, methods and objects has prompted earnest (and much debated) attempts to develop a unified methodology, and, at best, has elicited from American studies specialists an unusual degree of methodological self-consciousness. We hope to instill our interdisciplinary majors with a clear and responsible sense of the ways in which one may study American culture.

Much of the work of American Civilization takes place in the History and English Departments.

Requirements:

  • Two lower level courses from HIS 151, 152, 153, 212, 216 or 240
  • Two upper level courses from HIS 311, 312 or 322
  • Four courses from ENG 210, 380, 384, 385, 386, THR 388 or certain sections of ENG 235 (consult with Professor Pankratz)
  • One from Philosophy or Religious Studies
  • One additional course: ART 107; ECO 105, 335, or 336; PHI 216; POL 101, 210, 231/331, 322 or 334; REL 261 or 262; or SPA 308

American Civilization Majors with an emphasis in Literature:

  • ENG 399 or 491

American Civilization Majors with an emphasis in History:

  • HIS 493

American Civilization Majors interested in historical museum studies should take HIS 311 or 312 and complete a supervised internship at either the Landis Valley Farm Museum near Lancaster or the William Penn Museum in Harrisburg.

Students interested in this major should consult Professor Pankratz in the History Department.


Minor in History

The purpose of the History Minor is to provide Albright students with the opportunity to gain further exposure to developments in history while focusing on their chosen majors. A Minor in History complements majors in many fields, from Art or Biology to Sociology or Theatre thus allowing students to enjoy an interdisciplinary curriculum of the liberal arts mission.

Requirements:

Five History courses, to be taken across three levels (100-, 200- or 300-level) and two of the three geographical fields (US, Europe, World). (See the History Major requirements for a list of courses by geographical field)


Professional and Pre-professional programs and the History Major

History Majors and Combined Majors considering law school should confer with the pre-law adviser. Suzanne Palmer, J.D., LL.M., an attorney and Assistant Professor of Economics and Business in the Business, Accounting and Economics Department, is an experienced pre-law adviser who can guide students through the process of preparing for a career in law and the law school application process.

History Majors and Combined Majors interested in pursuing Albright’s teacher certification program should consult with the chair of the Education Department, Rodney Warfield, Ed.D., as soon as possible.


Secondary Social Studies Education

Students in History or Political Science preparing for a career in social sciences education take History and Political Science courses and a series of Education and other courses specified by the Education Department to meet Pennsylvania Department of Education regulations. As early as possible in their college experience, candidates for teacher certification in social studies should consult the Requirements section of the Education website and the chair of Education regarding specific course requirements. The Social Studies Education certification is a grades 7-12 program.

Holocaust Studies


Required courses for this minor are:

  • HIS 373 The Holocaust
  • REL 375 Religious Responses to the Holocaust
  • SPI 232 Holocaust in American Literature or SPI 234 Holocaust in World Literature
  • Two courses from HIS 267, 374, 375; PHI 204; POL 242; REL 250; SPI 230, 232, 234
  • Other courses or independent studies may be added or substituted once approved by instructors in the Holocaust Studies Program

Latin American and Caribbean Studies


The Latin American and Caribbean Studies Minor:

The Latin American and Caribbean Studies minor is a five-course curriculum. In either the first or second year of study, students must take the “Introduction to Latin American Studies” course (LAS 225). In the third or fourth year of study, students must take the core “Seminar on Latin America” (LAS 400). Students must also take, at any point in their four years at Albright, three Latin American and/or Caribbean content courses listed across the curriculum. For the minor option only, students are permitted to “double-count” these courses as fulfilling both the Latin American and Caribbean Studies program requirements and either general studies requirements or the particular requirements of any degree program.


Combined Major in Latin American and Caribbean Studies:

Latin American and Caribbean studies as a combined major is a seven-course curriculum. Students take the “Introduction to Latin American Studies” course (LAS 225) in their first or second year and then the core “Seminar on Latin America” (LAS 400) in their third or fourth year. Students must also take, at any point in their four years at Albright, five Latin American and/or Caribbean content courses listed across the curriculum.


The Interdisciplinary Major in Latin American and Caribbean Studies:

The interdisciplinary major in Latin American and Caribbean Studies is a 12-course curriculum that combines core, track and elective courses.

The core requirements are “Introduction to Latin American Studies” (LAS 225), which should be taken within the first two years of academic work at Albright, and the “Senior Seminar in Latin American Studies” (LAS 400), which should be taken in the junior or senior year.

After taking Introduction to Latin American Studies (LAS 225), students will declare a primary and secondary track from the two tracks (Group A or Group B). Group A consists of courses that focus more on the arts and humanities, and Group B consists of courses that focus more on the social and natural sciences.

The track is an eight- course sequence in which students choose five courses from one group and three courses from the other group to complete the track requirement. Note:  The Director may add additional courses to the groups.

Group A courses: LAS 160, 195, 201, 215, 220, 224, 228, 235, 240, 259, 275, 280, 285, 308, 319, 320, 321, 322, 325, 330, 340, 352, 380

Group B courses: LAS 215, 228, 270, 275, 280, 307, 322, 325, 330, 340, 345, 360

The major is also required to take two elective courses in Latin American Studies.

Medieval & Renaissance Studies


  • HIS 122 Medieval and Early Modern Civilization
  • One Literature in Original Language from
    • ENG352 Chaucer
    • ENG354 Shakespeare
    • ENG355 Tudor/Stuart
    • ENG356 Milton
    • LAT201 Intermediate Latin
    • FRE321 French Civilization and Culture
  • One Philosophy or Religious Studies course from
    • PHI210 Greek/Medieval
    • REL142 New Testament
    • REL251 Islam
    • REL253 History of Christianity to 1600
  • One Elective Course approved by the program coordinator
  • One Independent Study with a research paper or an approved module with a research paper in an upper-level course

Courses not listed above can be used with the approval of the program coordinator.

Philosophy



Full Major in Philosophy: 12 Courses Total

Option 1:  12 PHI COURSES

1 PHI 150
10 PHI Courses (including 2 selected from each of the 4 Core Areas)
Special Topics (PHI 183, 283, 383) and PHI 391/491 or 481 fulfill core requirements.
1 of PHI 391/481 or 491

Option 2:  9 PHI COURSES and 3 RELATED COURSES

1 PHI 150
1 of PHI 391/481 or 491
7 Courses (including 2 selected from each of the 3 Core areas)
Special Topics (PHI 183, 283, 383) and PHI 391/491 or 481 fulfill core requirements.
3 related courses from any department outside of Philosophy (e.g. History, Biology, Business, Political Science, Psychology, etc.)

Combined Major in Philosophy: 7 PHI COURSES 

1 PHI 150
1 of PHI 391/491 or 481
5 Courses (including 1 from each of the 4 Core Areas)
Special Topics (PHI 183, 283, 383) and PHI 391/491 or 481 fulfill core requirements. 

Minor in Philosophy: 5 PHI COURSES 

1 PHI 150
1 of 203, 210, 211, 214, 216, 314 or 315
3 PHI electives

The core area courses may be chosen from the following options: 

Reality and Knowledge PHI 120, 140, 175, 220, 245, 280, 323, 326.
Value Theory PHI 203, 204, 206, 230, 250, 260/360, 270/370, 314, 315.
Difference & Diversity PHI 130, 135, 152, 228, 256, 257, 296.
History of Philosophy PHI 210/310, 211/311, 214, 216/316, 314, 315.

Political Science


Major in Political Science

Requirements

  • POL 101 American Government (counts as General Studies Foundations Social Science)
  • POL 202 Introduction to International Relations
  • POL 205 Comparative Politics
  • POL 206 Political Inquiry
  • POL 207 Research Methods (counts as General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning)
  • POL 315 Political Theory
  • One approved Political Science senior-level seminar
  • Six additional advanced Political Science courses

Interdisciplinary Combined Major in Crime and Justice

The Political Science, Sociology and Psychology departments offer a Crime and Justice interdisciplinary major that focuses on the legal, political, administrative, psychological and sociological analyses of criminal deviance and societal responses to crime. See Crime and Justice under the Sociology Department for requirements.


Combined Major in Political Science

Requirements

  • POL 101 American Government (counts as General Studies Foundations Social Science)
  • POL 202 Introduction to International Relations
  • POL 205 Comparative Politics
  • POL 206 Political Inquiry
  • POL 315 Political Theory
  • One approved Political Science senior-level seminar
  • Two additional advanced Political Science courses

Minor in Political Science

Whether you are planning a career in the bureaucracy, the nonprofit world, or the private sector, government and politics impact you. Appreciating the ways policy is made, realizing how relationships between and among countries affect business and the populace, and understanding power structures are all hallmarks of the political science minor. The minor in political science shall consist of five courses with the following distribution:

  • POL 101, American Government
  • POL 202, International Relations, or POL 205, Comparative Politics
  • Any three additional Political Science courses

International Relations Combined Major

The interdisciplinary major in International Relations provides students you the tools you need to understand and evaluate relationships among nations, states and people as these are affected by conflict, globalization, health, climate changes and other challenges. Students contemplating careers in government, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, intelligence, international business, international law or diplomacy should consider this combined major. For more information, contact Professor Irene Langran, or visit http://www.albright.edu/IR/.
Requirements

  • POL 202 International Relations (POL/IR majors substitute HIS 215, HIS 237, HIS 315, SOC 305, POL 242 or POL273)
  • POL 205 Comparative Politics (POL/IR majors substitute POL 260, 345, HIS 211, HIS 220, HIS 228, HIS 232, HIS 242, HIS 256 or HIS 267))
  • POL 352 International Law and Organizations OR POL 242 Human Rights
  • Approved Political Science study abroad program
  • POL 403 Seminar or an approved International Relations Seminar
  • One of the following:
    • ANT 270 People of the World
    • POL 273 Globalization
    • HIS 315 World War II Era
    • SOC 305 Terrorism
  • One of the following:
    • ECO 233  Comparative Economics
    • ECO 234  Economic Development
    • ECO 301  International Economics

International Relations majors are strongly encouraged to develop facility in languages other than their native language. Students should stay alert to the options provided by independent study with qualified and willing instructors in the departments.


Interdisciplinary Combined Major in Public Health

The interdisciplinary combined major in public health is a liberal arts program in which students will gain a greater understanding of public health on local, national and global levels. The study of public health not only combines perspectives from the social sciences, sciences, mathematics and humanities, it also cultivates critical and analytical skills across disciplines, written and oral communication, teamwork ability, ethical reasoning, and civic knowledge and engagement. This major will benefit students who wish to pursue careers related to public health and the health sciences, law and policy, and other career paths that draw upon multidisciplinary approaches and critical engagement.  To study public health is to engage human biology, socio-economic contexts, personal choices and behaviors, environmental determinants, and political processes on local and global scales. 

Requirements

  • PUH 101 Introduction to Public Health
  • POL/SYN 330 Global Health
  • Statistics course from: BIO 200 Biometry, ECO 207 Business/Economics Statistics, MAT 110 Elementary Statistics, POL 207 Research Methods, PSY 200 Research I, or SOC 211 Statistics
  • PUH 310 Epidemiology
  • Public Health Internship
  • PUH 440 Public Health Capstone
  • One or two additional Public Health courses (students completing an approved Statistics course within their other major must take a second course)
    • HIS 205 History of US Medicine/Public Health
    • HIS 206 History of Urban Public Health
    • POL 214 Public Policy
    • POL 218 Public Administration
    • BIO 234 Anatomy & Physiology I
    • BIO 235 Anatomy & Physiology II
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 203 Human Services
    • SOC 262 Stratification
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
    • PHI 260 Biomedical Ethics
    • LAS 299 Disease, Death and Society in Latin America 1850-1990
    • ESS 325 Geographical Information Systems
    • ANT 303 Food & Culture
    • PSY 206 Social Psychology
    • PSY 230 Human Development
    • REL 236 God and Doctors: Religion, Health and Medicine
    • PSY 290 Diversity Issues
    • PSY 390 Psychopathology
    • Comparative Health Systems
  • BIO 151 General Biology I: Structure & Function is recommended for the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement.  Other Foundations-Natural Science courses are allowed

Public Health Minor

Requirements

  • PUH 101 Introduction to Public Health
  • POL/SYN 330 Global Health
  • Statistics course from: BIO 200 Biometry, ECO 207 Business/Economics Statistics, MAT 110 Elementary Statistics, POL 207 Research Methods, PSY 200 Research I, or SOC 211 Statistics
  • PUH 310 Epidemiology
  • Public Health Internship

Legal Studies Minor

The interdisciplinary minor in Legal Studies is designed to help you develop a thorough understanding of our legal system. For those considering law school, it serves as excellent academic preparation. You study the place of the legal system among our civil institutions, and develop the ability to read, understand and assess critically Supreme Court cases. This minor is open to all students interested in studying our legal system regardless of concentration or career goal. Contact Suzanne Palmer, J.D. for additional information. A total of five courses are required.

Requirements

REQUIRED of all minors:

  • POL 216 Law and Society

Take any TWO of the following:

  • POL 231/331 Criminal Law
  • POL 352 International Law & Organizations
  • POL 371 Constitutional Law
  • POL 372 Civil Liberties
  • POL 412 Law and Public Policy

Take any TWO of the following:

  • BUS 250 or BUS 351 Business Law I or II
  • PHI 150 Critical Thinking/Legal Reasoning (It is highly recommended that this course be taken by Sophomore year for anyone considering taking the LSAT, whether or not the Legal Studies Minor is completed.)
  • PHI 203 Ethics
  • PHI 204 Public Morality
  • PHI 230 Philosophy and Law
  • MUS 345 Music Law
  • POL 282/399 Internship

Secondary Social Studies Education

Students in History or Political Science preparing for a career in social sciences education take History and Political Science courses and a series of Education and other courses specified by the Education Department to meet Pennsylvania Department of Education regulations. As early as possible in their college experience, candidates for teacher certification in social studies should consult the Requirements section of the Education website and the chair of Education regarding specific course requirements. The Social Studies Education certification is a grades 7-12 program.

Psychology


Albright offers programs in Psychology and Psychobiology. Students majoring in psychology at Albright can choose to focus on a general psychology program or specialize with an interdisciplinary major in Psychobiology, Health Psychology, or a specialized track in child psychology.

Majors and Minors in the Psychology Department

 

 

Major in Psychology

The bachelor of arts degree program in psychology provides a balance of theoretical and applied courses in the discipline and prepares you for graduate study, professional school, or careers in social services, business, research and educational settings.

Requirements

  • All of the following core requirements:
    • PSY 100: General Psychology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science course)
    • PSY 200: Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (fulfills GS Foundations Quantitative course)
    • PSY 201: Research Methods in Psychology
    • PSY 405 or 406: Senior Seminar
  • One of the following research laboratory courses:
    • PSY 395: Psychological Assessment (recommended for those pursuing careers in clinical or school psychology)
    • PSY 396: Advanced Research Lab in Social, Personality, or Developmental Psychology
    • PSY 397: Advanced Research Lab in Biological, Cognitive, or Evolutionary Psychology
  • Three from Group I (Social, Developmental, and Clinical Approaches):
    • PSY 206: Social Psychology
    • PSY 210: Health Psychology
    • PSY 250: Personality
    • PSY 230: Human Development -OR- PSY240: Child Development
    • PSY 390: Adult Psychopathology -OR- PSY391: Child Psychopathology
  • Three from Group II (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Approaches):
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 305: Behavioral Neuroscience
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
    • PSY 360: Sensation and Perception
    • PSY 306: Special Topics (Biologically-based)
  • Three from Group III (Elective courses):
    • *Any of the above courses not already taken
    • PSY 215: Positive Psychology
    • PSY 220: Theories/Treatment of Addictive Behavior
    • PSY 265: Ecological Psychology
    • PSY 271: Organizational Psychology
    • PSY 290: Diversity
    • PSY 291: Cross-cultural Psychology
    • PSY 294: Drugs, Addictions and Society
    • PSY 306: Special Topic courses in any area
    • PSY 310: Health Behavior Change
    • PSY 321: Close Relationships
    • PSY 330: Human Sexuality
    • PSY 345: Language Development
    • PSY 346: Social Development
    • PSY 377: Epigenetics and Behavior
    • PSY 394: Counseling
    • PSY 303: Sex Roles
    • PSY 401: Fieldwork
    • PSY 396 or 397: Advanced research lab (with a different emphasis as taken above)
    • PSY 281, 381, 481: Independent Study/Advanced Research
    • PSY 282, 382, 482: Internship
  • One related course (200-level or higher) in the social or natural sciences or an additional psychology course (200-level or higher)

Total: 15 courses (2 captured for General Studies)


Combined Major in Psychology   
Students may elect to combine Psychology with any other major. Required courses in Psychology are:

  • All of the following core requirements:
    • PSY 100: General Psychology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science course)
    • PSY 200: Research Design and Analysis I (fulfills GS Foundations Quantitative course)
    • PSY 201: Research Design and Analysis II
    • PSY 405 or 406: Senior Seminar

Note: Sociology co-majors may take SOC210 Research Methods and SOC211 Statistics instead of PSY200 and PSY201, and if so, they must take any 2 additional psychology courses in place of PSY200 and Psy201.

Two from Group I (Social, Developmental, and Clinical Approaches):

    • PSY 206: Social Psychology
    • PSY 210: Health Psychology
    • PSY 250: Personality
    • PSY 230: Human Development -OR- PSY240: Child Development
    • PSY 390: Adult Psychopathology -OR- PSY391: Child Psychopathology
  • Two from Group II (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Approaches):
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 305: Behavioral Neuroscience
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
    • PSY 360: Sensation and Perception
  • One from Group III (Elective courses):
    • *Any of the above courses not already taken
    • PSY 215: Positive Psychology
    • PSY 220: Theories/Treatment of Addictive Behavior
    • PSY 265: Ecological Psychology
    • PSY 271: Organizational Psychology
    • PSY 290: Diversity
    • PSY 291: Cross-cultural Psychology
    • PSY 294: Drugs, Addictions and Society
    • PSY 306: Special Topic courses in any area
    • PSY 310: Health Behavior Change
    • PSY 321: Close Relationships
    • PSY 330: Human Sexuality
    • PSY 345: Language Development
    • PSY 346: Social Development
    • PSY 377: Epigenetics and Behavior
    • PSY 394: Counseling
    • PSY 395: Psychological Assessment
    • PSY 396/397:Advanced research lab
    • PSY 303: Sex Roles
    • PSY 401: Fieldwork
    • PSY 281, 381, 481: Independent Study/Advanced Research
    • PSY 282, 382, 482: Internship

Total: 9 courses (2 captured for General Studies)


Child Development Track
The Psychology Department offers a track in Child Development. This track is primarily for full Psychology majors but may be completed by Combined Psychology majors and students in other majors (such as Child & Family Studies and Psychobiology) who have the prerequisites.

  • Requirements
    • PSY 240: Child Development
    • PSY 391: Child Psychopathology
    • 400-level Child-Focused Psychology course
    • Three from the following, one MUST be a PSY course:
      • PSY 345: Language Development
      • PSY 346: Social Development
      • PSY347: Adolescent Development
      • PSY 306: Psychology Special Topics, Child Focused
      • PSY 395/396/397: Advanced Lab or Assessment, Child Focused Project
      • PSY 401: Child-Focused Field Experience/Internship (if not used for requirement #3)
      • PSY 406: Child-Focused Seminar (if not used for requirement #3)
      • SOC 203: Human Services
      • SOC 261: The Family
      • SOC 302: Juvenile Delinquency
      • SOC 270: Parenting and Technology
      • SOC 271: Work and Family Conflict

Interdisciplinary Major in Psychobiology
The bachelor of science in psychobiology is intended for students with an interest in both the behavioral and natural science approaches to psychology and biology. The major is especially ideal for developing an appreciation of the emerging fields of neuroscience and health psychology. Individuals arrange courses to satisfy their particular interests and prepare for advanced study in psychology, psychobiology, biology, behavioral ecology, veterinary medicine and the health professions (medicine, dentistry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, optometry), or employment in varied areas including pharmaceutical research or sales and allied health professions. Psychobiology majors must declare one of two tracks:  Molecular Psychobiology Track (more biologically oriented) or Behavioral Psychobiology Track (more psychologically oriented). Contact Dr. Keith Feigenson at kfeigenson@albright.edu for more information.

Behavioral Psychobiology Track 
The Behavioral Psychobiology track is more psychologically-oriented and is intended for those pursuing graduate work in health psychology, behavioral research, and some mental health related fields.

  • Psychology core requirements: (6 courses)
    • PSY 100: General Psychology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science course)
    • PSY 200: Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (fulfills GS Foundations Quantitative course)
    • PSY 201: Research Methods in Psychology
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 397: Advanced Research Lab in Biological, Cognitive, or Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 405 or 406: Senior Seminar
  • Biology core requirements:  (2 courses)
    • BIO 151: General Biology I: Structure & Function (fulfills GS Foundations Natural Science course)
    • BIO 203: Introduction to Genetics
  • One from Group I (Social, Developmental, and Clinical Psychology):
    • PSY 206: Social Psychology
    • PSY 210: Health Psychology
    • PSY 250: Personality
    • PSY 230: Human Development -OR- PSY240: Child Development
    • PSY 390: Adult Psychopathology -OR- PSY391: Child Psychopathology
  • Two from Group II (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Psychology):
    • PSY 305: Behavioral Neuroscience
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
    • PSY 360: Sensation and Perception
  • Three from Group III (Biological Science): (one MUST be at least 300 level)
    • BIO 152: General Biology II: Systematics, Ecology, and Evolution
    • BIO 220: Evolution (152 or203)
    • BIO 234: Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • BIO 235: Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • BIO 319: Vertebrate Natural History (152)
    • BIO 327: Histology and Microtechniques (151)
    • BIO 331: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (151)
    • BIO 333: Developmental Biology (151, 203)
    • BIO 337: Comparative Animal Physiology and Ecophysiology (151, 152, CHE105)
  • Two Elective courses:
    • Any PSY course not previously taken
    • Any BIO course not previously taken
    • CHE105- General Analytical Chemistry I
    • Either ANT 342 Human Evolution or ANT 285 The Human Animal

Total: 16 courses (3 captured for General Studies)

Molecular Psychobiology Track 
Students must declare one of two tracks for the Psychobiology major. The Molecular Psychobiology track is more biologically-oriented and is intended for those pursuing graduate work in neuroscience, the medical field, and other related fields.

  • Psychology core requirements:  (5 courses)
    • PSY 100: General Psychology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science course)
    • PSY 200: Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (fulfills GS Foundations Quantitative Reasoning course)
    • PSY 201: Research Methods in Psychology
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 397: Advanced Research Lab in Biological, Cognitive, or Evolutionary Psychology
  • Biology/Chemistry core requirements:  (4 courses)
    • BIO 151: General Biology I: Structure and Function (fulfills GS Foundations Natural Science course)
    • BIO 203: Introduction to Genetics
    • CHE 105: General Analytical Chemistry I
    • CHE 106: General Analytical Chemistry II
  • Two from Group I (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Psychology):
    • PSY 305: Behavioral Neuroscience
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
    • PSY 360: Sensation and Perception
  • Two from Group II (Molecular Biological Sciences):
    • CHE 207:Organic Chemistry I
    • BIO 220: Evolution (BIO152 or 203)
    • BIO 321: Microbiology  (BIO151, 203, CHE207)
    • BIO 322: Cell Biology (BIO151, 203, CHE207)
    • BIO 325: Molecular Genetics (BIO151, 203, CHE207)
    • BIO 327: Histology and Microtechniques (BIO151)
    • BIO 329: Virology (BIO203 and CHE207)
  • One from Group III (Organismal Biological Sciences):
    • BIO 152: General Biology II: Systematics, Ecology, and Evolution
    • BIO 234: Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • BIO 235: Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • BIO 331: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (BIO151)
    • BIO 333: Developmental Biology (BIO151 and 203)
    • BIO 337: Comparative Animal Physiology and Ecophysiology (BIO151, 152, CHE105)
    • BIO 398: Animal & Human Nutrition (BIO151 and CHE207)
  • One Elective course in any PSY or BIO not previously taken
  • One Senior Seminar:
    • PSY 405 or 406: Senior Seminar
    • BIO 490’s: Senior Seminar

Total: 16 courses (3 captured for General Studies)


Interdisciplinary Major in Child and Family Studies
The interdisciplinary major in Child and Family Studies is for students interested in psychosocial approaches to child development and family dynamics. This B.A. degree program, which combines Psychology and Sociology (Family Studies Track), provides the breadth and depth required to work in human services or to pursue graduate studies in human development, psychology or family studies.

Full Course List for Child and Family Studies Major

  • Complete Core Research Methods and Statistics sequence and Senior Seminar (PSY200 or SOC211 fulfills GS quantitative requirement)
    • SOC 210 (Research Methods) & SOC211 (Statistics) & SOC490 (Senior Seminar) OR
    • PSY 200 (Research Design & Analysis I) & PSY201 (Research Design & Analysis II) & PSY405/406 (Senior Seminar)

Psychology Requirements

  • Core Psychology requirement:
    • PSY 100: General Psychology
  • Developmental Psychology Requirement
    • PSY230 (Lifespan Development) or PSY240 (Child Development)
  • One from Group I (Social, Developmental, and Clinical Approaches):
    • PSY206: Social Psychology
    • PSY210: Health Psychology
    • PSY250: Personality
    • PSY390: Adult Psychopathology
    • PSY391: Child Psychopathology
  • One from Group II (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Approaches):
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
  • One from Group III (Child-Focused Elective courses):
    • PSY345: Language Development
    • PSY346: Social Development
    • PSY347: Adolescent Development
  • Psychology Elective: Any additional psychology course not previously taken

 

Sociology Requirements

  • All of the following core requirements:
    • SOC 101: Intro
    • SOC 213: Social Theory
  • Additional specialized family course requirement:
    • SOC 261: The Family
  • One of the following lower level specialized courses:
    • SOC 203: Human Services
    • SOC 270:  Parenting and Technology
    • SOC 271:  Work & Family Conflict
  • Two of the following intermediate specialized courses:
    • SOC 302: Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 311: Domestic Violence
    • ANT 320: Sex, Gender, Culture
  • The following advanced application courses:
    • SOC 470: Immigration & Transnat’l Families

Interdisciplinary Major in Health Psychology

The interdisciplinary major in health psychology provides students with a strong foundation in general psychology, while also providing a concentrated focus on the emerging discipline of health psychology. The program will employ a biopsychosocial perspective in helping students to understand factors that influence health and wellness. Students will use this approach to create treatments that prevent illness and improve health outcomes. In addition, courses provided through other departments, such as Public Health, will enhance student understanding of the medical and mental healthcare systems at a broader policy level. Students graduating with a degree in health psychology will be prepared to pursue careers or graduate study in counseling, nursing, research coordination, and occupational health. Contact Dr. Bridget Hearon, bhearon@albright.edu for more information.

  • All of the following core requirements:
    • PSY100: General Psychology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science course)
    • PSY200: Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (fulfills GS Foundations Quantitative course)
    • PSY201: Research Methods in Psychology
    • PSY405 or 406: Senior Seminar
    • PSY210: Health Psychology
    • PSY205: Biological Psychology
  • PSY390: Adult Psychopathology -OR- PSY391: Child Psychopathology
  • PUH101: Intro to Public Health
  • One of the following research laboratory courses:
    • PSY396: Advanced Research Lab in Social, Personality, or Developmental Psychology
    • PSY397: Advanced Research Lab in Biological, Cognitive, or Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY395: Assessment

Note: Students are encouraged to design a research project relating to health psychology

  • Three Health-Focused Psychology Electives
    • PSY215: Positive Psychology
    • PSY220: Theories and Treatment of Addictive Behaviors
    • PSY305: Behavioral Neuroscience
    • PSY310: Health Behavior Change
    • PSY330: Human Sexuality
    • PSY355: Motivation
    • PSY377: Epigenetics and Behavior
    • Independent study in health psychology or internship (PSY401) in a health-related setting
  • Health-related Psy306 (subject to chair approval)
  • Two Public Health Electives
    • POL/SYN330: Global Health
    • PUH310: Epidemiology
    • HIS205 History of US Medicine/Public Health
    • HIS206 History of Urban Public Health
  • PHI260: Biomedical Ethics
  • SOC203: Human Services
  • SOC311: Domestic Violence
  • ANT303: Food and Culture
  • REL236: God & Doctors: Religion/Health/Medicine

Evolutionary Studies Minor
The Evolutionary Studies Minor is meant to create opportunities for faculty and students at Albright to (a) develop a deep understanding of evolutionary ideas, (b) conduct cross-disciplinary research using evolution as a synthesizing paradigm, and (c) contribute to novel ideas across disciplines guided by evolutionary reasoning. Contact Dr. Susan Hughes at 610-929-6732, shughes@albright.edu for more information.

  • Curriculum:
    • PSY 100: General Psychology
    • BIO 203: Genetics or BIO 152 General Biology II: Systematics, Ecology and Evolution
    • Two of the following:
      • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
      • BIO 220: Evolution
      • ANT 342: Human Evolution
    • One of the following:
      • PSY 319, BIO 220 or ANT 342 (if not already taken from course 3 & 4 options)
      • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
      • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
      • PSY 265/ANT 265: Ecological Psychology
      • BIO 319: Vertebrate Natural History
      • BIO 331: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
      • BIO 494: Mammalian Evolution
      • ANT 285: The Human Animal
      • ANT 320: Sex/Gender/Culture
      • PHI 140: Human Nature
  • Additional courses: If special Seminars or Special Topics classes arise that may be pertinent to this program, students may petition their advisors to have other courses count toward this program.
  • Includes opportunities for Independent Study and involvement in faculty research to fulfill program requirements.

Public Health


Interdisciplinary Combined Major in Public Health

The interdisciplinary combined major in public health is a liberal arts program in which students will gain a greater understanding of public health on local, national and global levels. The study of public health not only combines perspectives from the social sciences, sciences, mathematics and humanities, it also cultivates critical and analytical skills across disciplines, written and oral communication, teamwork ability, ethical reasoning, and civic knowledge and engagement. This major will benefit students who wish to pursue careers related to public health and the health sciences, law and policy, and other career paths that draw upon multidisciplinary approaches and critical engagement.  To study public health is to engage human biology, socio-economic contexts, personal choices and behaviors, environmental determinants, and political processes on local and global scales. 

Requirements

  • PUH 101: Introduction to Public Health
  • PUH 330: Global Health
  • Statistics: choose from BIO 200, ECO 207, MAT 110, POL 207, PSY 200 (PSY co-majors only), or SOC 211
  • BIO 151: General Biology I: Structure & Function. This is recommended for the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement. Other Foundations-Natural Science courses are also allowed.
  • PUH 310: Epidemiology Prerequisites: PUH 101 and Statistics
  • PUH 382: Public Health Internship Prerequisite: PUH 101
  • Public Health Elective (see indented list below)
  • If the statistics requirement above counts towards another co-major, take an additional public health elective
  • PUH 440: Capstone
    • ANT 206: Food and Culture
    • BIO 234: Anatomy and Physiology I
    • BIO 235: Anatomy and Physiology II. A passing grade in BIO 234 is required to take this class.
    • ESS 325: Geographical Information Systems
    • HIS 205: Social History of Medicine and Public Health in the US
    • HIS 206: History of Urban Public Health
    • LAS 299: Disease, Death and Society in Latin America 1850-1990
    • PHI 260: Biomedical Ethics
    • POL 214: Public Policy
    • POL 302: Public Administration
    • PSY 206: Social Psychology. A passing grade in PSY 100 or special permission is required to take this class.
    • PSY 210: Health Psychology
    • PSY 215: Positive Psychology
    • PSY 220: Theories and treatment of addictive behaviors
    • PSY 230: Human Development. A passing grade in PSY 100 or special permission is required to take this class.
    • PSY 290: Human Behavior and Diversity Issues
    • PSY 310: Health behavior change. Prerequisite: PSY 210.
    • PSY 330: Human Sexuality. Prerequisite: PSY 200 or permission.
    • PSY 390: Adult Psychopathology and Behavior. This course is only an elective for Psychology co-majors.
    • REL 236: Gods and Doctors: Religion, Health and Medicine
    • SOC 201: Social Problems
    • SOC 203: Human Services for Families and Children. A passing grade in SOC 201 is required to take this class.
    • SOC 262: Stratification and Structured Inequality
    • SOC 291: Environmental Sociology

Public Health Minor

Requirements

  • PUH 101: Introduction to Public Health
  • PUH 330: Global Health
  • Statistics: choose from BIO 200, ECO 207, MAT 110, POL 207, PSY 200 (PSY co-majors only), or SOC 211
  • PUH 310: Epidemiology Prerequisites: PUH 101 and Statistics
  • Public Health Internship Prerequisite: PUH 101

Religious Studies


Major in Religious Studies

Requirements

The religious studies major requires thirteen courses, at least ten courses in religious studies beyond the general studies requirement. Majors are also permitted to take three related courses (beyond general studies) in the areas of philosophy, history, literature, the arts or the social sciences. Although there are no “core” courses, majors are expected to take courses from a diversity of areas in religious studies. Upperclass majors must take a 300-level course and senior majors must take REL 491, in which they are expected to present a senior thesis or project interpreting an issue in the study of human religion and culture from the appropriate methodological perspectives.

Fourth Year:
• REL 491


Combined Major in Religious Studies

The department welcomes students who wish to pursue interdisciplinary work in conjunction with religious studies through either a combined major or an individualized study program. Combined majors are required to take seven religious studies courses, beyond general studies, including a 300-level course in religious studies and REL 491. The department especially encourages students to consider interdisciplinary work in areas such as: religion and philosophy, religion and human culture, religion and human behavior, religion and literature, religion and communication, religion and law, or religion and the arts. More information on how such programs might be structured is available from the Religious Studies Department.

 

Minor in Religious Studies

A minor in religious studies consists of five courses. Religious studies is a broad and interdisciplinary field, so students will be able to craft the content of their minor depending on their interest. Combined majors are required to take:

One 100 or 200-level religious studies course
One 300-level religious studies course
Three other religious studies courses

More information is available from the Religious Studies Department.


Pre-Theological Students

Although pre-theological students don’t have to major in religious studies, the study and practice of religion is vital to their growth and maturation during college and is an integral part of their preparation for seminary. Working together with the College chaplain, campus religious organizations and the wider religious community in Reading, the Religious Studies Department seeks to encourage, counsel and assist pre-theological students in their personal and vocational journeys of faith.

Sociology & Anthropology


Perhaps the most comprehensive of the social sciences, sociology is concerned with the analysis and explanation of social phenomena. These phenomena, which range from the socialization of the child to criminal behavior and cultural change, are studied and investigated using a wide variety of research techniques. Through formalized standards of inquiry, sociologists focus on the relationships between the parts of social systems and how the systems are formulated, how they function, and how they are related to the everyday lives of human beings.

The Sociology and Anthropology Department offers four tracks:

The department also supports the following interdisciplinary majors:

In addition, students can combine each of the four tracks mentioned above with another academic discipline to form a combined major. The department also offers minors in Anthropology,  Criminology and Sociology.

Core Courses

This diversity of majors covers a wide range of topics, but they are unified by a set of core requirements for all students in the department (with the exception of the environmental studies interdisciplinary major). These core courses include:

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (or ANT 101 for anthropology majors)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics
  • SOC 213 Social Theory (anthropology students have other course options to satisfy this requirement)
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar

(Some substitutions are allowed in the above for students co-majoring in another social science with similar required courses and those with interdisciplinary majors. These are noted below).

Appropriate academic skills are also ensured at each level in that all 300-level courses (excluding 400-level Anthropology) require a sophomore standing or above as a pre-requisite, and all 400-level sociology (excluding 400-level Anthropology) courses require a junior standing or above. Courses at the 400 level also have as a prerequisite that all other core courses be completed in addition to at least one additional 300-level course. Many other prerequisites exist for individual courses to ensure that students can build on a specific set of foundational skills in their upper-level courses.


Anthropology Major

The anthropology major expands the focus of investigation to include biological, cultural and ecological forces that have effects on humans. From human evolution to cultural diversity to ecological constraints, students learn to incorporate a broad array of information and perspectives to arrive at a more complete and complex understanding of the human species. Four core courses provide a comprehensive foundation about the essential constraints that act on mankind. Additionally, two electives must be completed to enhance the students’ understanding in particular areas (conflict, sex, evolution). Finally, students complete their anthropological courses with an independent study in which they design and conduct a semester-long research project that requires them to gather and assess data in one particular area of human activity.

Due to the broad and multidisciplinary nature of anthropology, students completing this major will be prepared to undertake graduate studies in a variety of disciplines including anthropology, sociology, law, medicine and a number of other social, environmental and biological sciences. Likewise, they will be prepared to enter careers in a variety of areas, such as international relations, international business, education, medicine, public policy, law, labor organization, government, environmental resource management, economics and development, social work and counseling.

Requirements

  • ANT 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science requirement)
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning Requirement)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods or ESS 298 Ecological and Anthropological Field Study in Peru
  • One of the following:
    • PSY 205 Biological Psychology
    • SOC 213 Social Theory
    • PSY 319 Evolutionary Psychology
  • ANT 285 The Human Animal
  • ANT 310 Crime, Culture and Conflict Resolution
  • ANT 320 Sex, Gender and Culture (ANT 303 Food and Culture can be substituted for either ANT 310 or ANT 320)
  • ANT 342 Human Evolution
  • ANT 382/482 Internship (or an approved course)
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar (students in the anthropology major may substitute an independent study with permission from the department)
  • One of the following:
    • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 231 Cults
    • SOC 251 Crime and Deviance
    • SOC 261 The Family
    • SOC 262 Social Stratification
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
  • One of the following:
    • ANT 270 People of the World
    • ANT 303 Food and Culture
    • ANT 365 Ecological Psychology
  • Two of the following:
    • ANT 270 People of the World (if not used above)
    • ANT 280 Martinique Studies
    • ANT 303 Food and Culture (if not used above)
    • ANT 365 Ecological Psychology (if not used above)
    • ESS 298 Ecological and Anthropological Field Study in Peru (if not used above)
    • LAS 160 Caribbean Culture
    • LAS 225 Introduction to Latin American Studies
    • LAS 275 Service Learning in the Dominican Republic
    • LAS 285 Ritual in Latin America
    • LAS 352 Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World
    • REL 250 Judaism: Religion and Culture
    • REL 251 Islam: Ideals and Realities
    • REL 257 Buddhism Across Cultures
    • REL 266 Asian Cultural Life
    • REL 267 African and African-American Religious Traditions
    • REL 268 The Sacred Paths of Native Americans
    • SOC 331 Sociology of Mass Media and Popular Culture
    • SOC 395 Comparative Cultures: Ecuador

Combined Anthropology Major

Requirements

  • ANT 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science requirement)
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning Requirement)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods or ESS 298 Ecological and Anthropological Field Study in Peru
  • One of the following:
    • PSY 205 Biological Psychology
    • SOC 213 Social Theory
    • PSY 319 Evolutionary Psychology
  • ANT 342 Human Evolution
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar (students in the anthropology major may substitute an independent study with permission from the department)
  • Two of the following:
    • ANT 285 The Human Animal
    • ANT 310 Crime, Culture and Conflict Resolution
    • ANT 320 Sex, Gender and Culture
  • One of the following:
    • ANT 270 People of the World
    • ANT 280 Martinique Studies
    • ANT 303 Food and Culture
    • ANT 265 Ecological Psychology

Anthropology Minor

The anthropology minor enables students to gain a holistic understanding of both biological and cultural effects on humans. The courses in the anthropology minor provide a basis for understanding the effects of these forces on humans cross-culturally in a variety of habitats. Topics of investigation include violence, sex, cooperation and ecological relationships. Contact Prof. Barty Thompson.

Requirements:

  • ANT 101
  • One from ANT 342 or ANT 285
  • Three from ANT 270, 303, 310, 320, 365

Criminology Major

The criminology major exposes students to the sociological perspective through study of the methodology of the field, basic theoretical paradigms, as well as the study of socialization, culture, deviance and conformity, social organization and societal development, complex organizations, and the principles of stratification and other forms of social inequality. In addition, students study the social problem of crime and deviance within the context of other social problems, e.g., family dysfunction, poverty, education, racism, gender issues, and the sociology of work and occupations. Courses that concentrate on crime and delinquency are concerned with:

· The study of behaviors defined as criminally deviant in both American society and other developed and developing societies

· The traditional and contemporary theoretical explanations of both the process of defining criminal behavior and the social and interpersonal decisions and circumstances related to engaging in criminalized deviant behavior

Students study the methodology of social research used in the study of these forms of deviance including secondary data analysis and empirical research construction and design. A course in parametric and nonparametric statistics provides students with additional analytic tools for use in collecting and studying aggregate- as well as individual-level data on crime and delinquency.

Students are able to use internship opportunities to experience and participate in the activities of an organization or agency whose activities relate to the application of the program content. Internship opportunities can be either in a local organization or agency or in association with an off-campus experience such as the Washington Center or the Philadelphia Center. The senior seminar provides students a capstone course integrating the various components of the program and incorporating the opportunity to complete a major empirical study of some facet of crime and delinquency of interest to them.

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • SOC 251 Crime & Deviance
  • SOC 202 The Criminal Justice System
  • SOC 382/482 Internship, travel abroad course, or a 400-level approved substitution
  • Two of the following:
    • ANT 101 Intro to Cultural Anthropology
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 230 Cultural Sociology
    • SOC 231 Cults & New Religious Movements
    • SOC 261 The Family
    • SOC 262 Social Stratification
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
    • ANT 285 The Human Animal
  • Four of the following:
    • SOC 253 Criminal Investigation and SOC 254 Advanced Criminal Investigation (must take both courses to satisfy one of the requirements from this list)
    • SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 305 Terrorism
    • SOC 307 Organized Crime
    • SOC 309 Crim. Corrections
    • ANT 310 Crime, Culture, Conflict Resolution
    • SOC 311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC 360 Crime and the Media
    • SOC 385 Violence & Victims
  • One of the following:
    • SOC 440 Ethnographies in Crime and Deviance
    • SOC 450 White-Collar Crime
    • SOC 460 Serial Murder

Study Abroad courses are also encouraged as electives.


Combined Criminology Major

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • SOC 251 Crime & Deviance
  • One of the following intermediate specialized courses:
    • SOC 253 Criminal Investigation and SOC 254 Advanced Criminal Investigation (must take both courses to satisfy one of the requirements from this list)
    • SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 305 Terrorism
    • SOC 307 Organized Crime
    • SOC 309 Crim. Corrections
    • ANT 310 Crime, Culture, Conflict Resolution
    • SOC 311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC 360 Crime and the Media
    • SOC 385 Violence & Victims
  • One of the following advanced application courses:
    • SOC 440 Ethnographies in Crime and Deviance
    • SOC 450 White-Collar Crime
    • SOC 460 Serial Murder

Because this is a combined major there are relatively few topically based requirements.  Therefore it is strongly encouraged that criminology combined majors use their electives to take additional topical courses


Criminology Minor

The criminology minor exposes students to the sociological perspective through study of the methodology of the field, basic theoretical paradigms, as well as the study of socialization, culture, deviance and conformity, social organization and societal development, complex organizations, and the principles of stratification and other forms of social inequality. In addition, students study the social problem of crime and deviance within the context of other social problems such as family dysfunction, poverty, education, racism, gender issues, and the sociology of work and occupations.

Requirements:

  • SOC101 Introduction to Sociology
  • SOC251 Crime and Deviance
  • Three of the following courses:
    • SOC202 The Criminal Justice System
    • SOC210 Research Methods
    • SOC211 Social Statistics
    • SOC213 Social Theory
    • SOC253 Criminal Investigation
    • SOC254 Advanced Criminal Investigation
    • SOC302 Juvenile Deliquency
    • SOC305 Terrorism
    • SOC307 Organized Crime
    • SOC309 Criminal Corrections
    • SOC311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC360 Crime and the Media
    • SOC385 Violence and Victims
    • ANT310 Crime Culture, Conflict Resolution


Family Studies Major

The family studies major provides students with an extensive academic understanding of family systems and their relationship to the development and social participation of their members as well as the skills to evaluate and conduct research on topics related to family interaction. The course requirements for students in this program focus on understanding the family as a social group and the dynamics of family participation in American society as well as in a global context. Students are introduced to the theory of group formation, the external forces that impinge upon family functioning and the methods that can be used to measure and anticipate family dysfunctions. Students who combine family studies with another major may enter the employment market immediately upon graduation in fields such as preschool education, elementary education, and residential treatment and care, or may pursue a graduate degree in family studies.

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Quantitative Reasoning course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • SOC 203 Human Services for Families and Children
  • SOC 261 The Family
  • SOC 270 Parenting & Technology or SOC 271 Work & Family Conflict
  • SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
  • SOC 311 Domestic Violence
  • ANT 320 Sex, Gender, & Culture
  • SOC 382/482 Internship, travel abroad course, or a 400-level approved substitution
  • Two of the following:
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 230 Cultural Sociology
    • SOC 251 Crime & Deviance
    • SOC 262 Social Stratification
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
    • ANT 101 Introduction to Anthropology
    • ANT 285 The Human Animal
  • One of the following:
    • SOC 470 Immigration & Transnational Families

Combined Family Studies Major

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Quantitative Reasoning course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • SOC 261 The Family
  • One of the following intermediate courses:
    • SOC 203 Human Services for Families and Children
    • SOC 270 Parenting & Technology
    • SOC 271 Work and Family Conflict
    • SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC ANT 320 Sex, Gender, & Cultur
  • One of the following advanced application courses:
    • SOC 470 Immigration & Transnational Families

Students are also encouraged to complete an internship as an elective.


General Sociology Major

The sociology major is designed for students who are interested in a general, though intensive, study of sociological methodology, theory and content areas. Students with a major in sociology can find employment in business and government, in human service organizations and international organizations, as politicians, educators, journalists and social researchers, and in foreign service. The general sociology major is intended primarily for students who plan to attend law school or pursue graduate study in sociology. It is also intended for those who seek careers in business, governmental or community service occupations for which graduate school training is unnecessary.

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning Course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • SOC 382/482 Internship, travel abroad course, or a 400-level approved substitution
  • Two of the following:
    • ANT 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 202 The Criminal Justice System
    • SOC 230 Cultural Sociology
    • SOC 261 The Family
    • SOC 262 Social Stratification
    • ANT 285 The Human Animal
  • One of the following:
    • ANT 310 Crime, Culture and Conflict Resolution
    • ANT 320 Sex, Gender and Culture
  • Two of the following:
    • SOC 203 Human Service for Families & Children
    • SOC 231 Cults & New Religious Movements
    • SOC 251 Crime and Deviance
    • SOC 270 Parenting & Technology or SOC 271 Work and Family Conflict
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
  • Three of the following:
    • SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 305 Terrorism
    • SOC 307 Organized Crime
    • SOC 311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC 331 Mass Media & Popular Culture
    • SOC 332 Sport & Leisure
    • SOC 333 Sociology of Religion
    • SOC 334 Religion & Popular Culture
    • SOC 360 Crime and the Media
    • SOC 385 Violence and Victims
  • One of the following:
    • SOC 430 Collective Behavior & Social Movements
    • SOC 440 Ethnographies in Crime and Deviance
    • SOC 450 White Collar Crime
    • SOC 460 Serial Murder

Combined General Sociology Major

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • One of the following:
    • ANT 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 202 The Criminal Justice System
    • SOC 230 Cultural Sociology
    • SOC 251 Crime & Deviance
    • SOC 261 The Family
    • SOC 262 Social Stratification
    • ANT 285 Human Animal
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
  • One additional 300-level sociology course
  • One additional 400-level sociology course

Sociology Minor

Sociology is the scientific study of people and groups. This focus can be as narrow as looking at short interactions between people in passing or as complex as analyzing global social processes. Perhaps the most comprehensive of the social sciences, sociology is concerned with the analysis and explanation of the most challenging issues of our time: street crime and delinquency, corporate downsizing and dislocation, child abuse and dysfunctional families, welfare and education reform, racism and ethnic cleansing, and problems of peace and war. The sociology minor provides significant study of the discipline through a selection of 5 courses.

Students are required to complete SOC101 “Introduction to Sociology” and four additional courses with a SOC- or ANT- prefix.

Urban Affairs


All of the following core requirements:

  • ECO105 Principles of Economics
  • SOC101 Introduction to Sociology or ANT101 Introduction to Anthropology (required Social Science Foundations course)
  • POL220 Urban Politics
  • SOC210 Research Methods
  • ESS325 Geographical Information Systems
  • SOC211 Social Statistics (required Quantitative Reasoning Foundations course)
  • HIS322  The City in American History (Should HIS322 be unavailable, HIS206 Healthy Cities: Urban Public Health, HIS311 US Social History, HIS312 US Economic History, or HIS280: Living on Earth: Ecological Approaches to the American Past may be taken as substitutions)
  • ECO337 Public Finance and Policy or ECO224 Environmental Economics
  • POL214 Public Policy
  • URB490 Senior Seminar in Urban Affairs

Students must also complete ONE of the following tracks or specialties within Urban Affairs:

Human Services and Diversity Track/Specialty

 Complete three of the following:

  • ANT320 Sex/Gender/Culture
  • PHI135 Race, Class and Gender
  • PSY290 Diversity Issues
  • SOC203 Human Services for Families and Children
  • SOC261 The Family
  • SOC262 Social Stratification and Structured Inequality

Environment Track/Specialty                    

  • ESS 101 Introduction to Environmental Issues
  • Complete two of the following:
    • ANT/PSY 265 Ecological Psychology
    • ECO224 Environmental Economics
    • POL321 Environmental Policy
    • SOC291 Environmental Sociology
    • SOC251 Crime and Deviance

Crime Track/Specialty

  • SOC251 Crime and Deviance
  • Complete two of the following:
    • ANT310 Crime, Culture, and Conflict Resolution
    • SOC202 The Criminal Justice System
    • SOC302 Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC305 Terrorism
    • SOC307 Organized Crime
    • SOC311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC360 Crime and the Media
    • SOC385 Violence and Victims

Communications Track/Specialty

  • COM250 Mass Communications and Society or SOC331 Mass Media and Pop Culture
  • Complete two of the following:
    • COM315 Public Affairs Reporting
    • COM317 Public Relations and Advertising Campaign Planning
    • COM327 Public Relations Writing
    • SOC360 Crime and the Media

Ethics and Law Track/Specialty

Complete three of the following:

  • BUS250 Business Law
  • POL331 Criminal Law
  • POL372 Civil Liberties
  • COM320 Freedom of Expression
  • PHI135 Race, Class and Gender
  • PHI140 Individual and Society
  • PHI 203 Ethics or PHI 250 Business Ethics or PHI 270 Environmental Ethics
  • PHI204 Contemporary Moral Problems

 

Combining Urban Affairs with other Majors 

Requirements:

  • SOC101 Introduction to Sociology or ANT101 Introduction to Anthropology (required Social Science Foundations course)
  • ECO105 Principles of Economics
  • POL220 Urban Politics
  • SOC210 Research Methods
  • SOC211 Social Statistics (required Quantitative Reasoning Foundations course)
  • ESS325 Geographical Information Systems
  • ECO 337 Public Finance and Policy or ECO 224 Environmental Economics
  • Senior Seminar

 

Urban Affairs Minor:

The Urban Affairs Minor engages the multidisciplinary study of such issues as the history of urbanization, economic influences on urban growth and development, political influences on and of the city, social/cultural causes and effects, and the interplay of each of these dynamics.    It is designed to provide analytic skills, theoretical frameworks, research methods, and substantive knowledge to initiate and evaluate constructive solutions to urban problems such as poverty and economic/political inequality, racial segregation, damage to the natural environment, and crime and corruption.  More information about urban studies can be found under the listing for the major in Urban Affairs.

 

Requirements:

 

  • SOC101 Introduction to Sociology or ANT101 Introduction to Anthropology (required Social Science Foundations course)
  • POL220 Urban Politics
  • POL214 Public Policy or ECO 337 Public Finance and Policy
  • HIS322 The City in American History (Should HIS322 be unavailable, HIS206 Urban Public Health, HIS311 US Social History, HIS312 US Economic History, or HIS280: Living on Earth: Ecological Approaches to the American Past may be taken as substitutions)
  • ESS325 Geographical Information Systems or SOC210 Research Methods

Women's and Gender Studies


Combined Major Requirements

  • Introducing Sex and Gender (WGS 210)
  • Seminar in Women’s Studies (WGS 400)
  • 200-level internship
  • Four other women’s and gender studies courses (It is important to understand that students electing the combined major in women’s and gender studies can not earn general studies credit for the courses which are part of their major.)

The listings and topics vary from year to year, but among the courses offered on a regular basis for either the minor or the co-major are:

  • Introducing Sex and Gender (WGS 210)
  • Sex, Gender, Bible (REL 244)
  • US Women’s History (HIS 204)
  • God and Doctors: Religion, Health, and Medicine (REL 236)
  • Gender and Sexuality in American Religions (REL 260)
  • Women’s Work (HIS 275)
  • Women in Latin America (LAS 340)
  • U.S. Social History: The American Family 1600-1900 (HIS 311)
  • Sex, Gender and Culture (ANT 320)
  • The Family (SOC 261)
  • Social Stratification (SOC 262)
  • Parenting and Technology (SOC 270)
  • Work and Family Conflict (SOC271)
  • Domestic Violence (SOC 311)
  • Immigration and Transnational Families (SOC470)
  • Women Writing in America (ENG 235)
  • Black Women Writers (ENG 235)
  • Women Writers: Africa & the Caribbean (ENG 235)
  • Women’s Texts (ENG 390)
  • Women, Gender & Mass Media (COM 283)

Minor Requirements

  • Introducing Sex and Gender (WGS 210)
  • 200-level internship
  • Three other women’s and gender studies courses

Languages and Literature at Albright

Are you ready to connect with different people and cultures? Learn to express thoughts clearly, persuasively and artfully by developing your ability to think and read critically.

Programs

Classical Studies
English
French
Spanish
World Languages and Cultures


Program Requirements

Classical Studies


The Classical Studies minor requires the completion of five courses.

Requirements:

  • Two semesters of Latin or Greek (101 & 102 or higher)
  • Three additional courses from:
    • GRE 101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, or 402
    • LAT101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 302, or 401
    • ART 105 Ancient & Medieval Art
    • ENG 270 The Classical Heritage
    • HIS 101 Early Civilizations
    • HIS 135 World History I
    • PHI 210 Greek & Medieval Philosophy
    • REL 142 New Testament
    • REL 154 Classical Mythology
    • One of the following:
      • ART 253 Art of the Renaissance
      • ENG 235 Renaissance Literature
      • ENG 301 Historical Study of Language
      • HIS 122 Medieval & Early Modern Civilization
      • HIS 261 Renaissance

English


Major in English Language and Literature

  • Group 1: ENG 201 British Literature to 1789; 202 British Literature from 1789; and 204 American Literature
  • Group 2: two from ENG 350 Beowulf’s World; 351 Middle English Literature; 352 Chaucer; 354 Shakespeare; 355 Renaissance; 356 Milton/17th Century; 357 Restoration/18th Century
  • Group 3: two from ENG 380 Modern American Women Poets; 384 American Writers to 1865; 385 American Writers from 1865; 386 Modern American Fiction; THR 388 Postmodern American Drama
  • Group 4: two from ENG 366 Romanticism; 368 Victorian; 372 British Fiction to 1890; 373 Modern British and Irish Fiction; 374 European Fiction; THR 389 Postmodern British Drama
  • Group 5: two additional courses from the following: ENG courses at the 200-level or 300-level, COM222 Writing for the Mass Media
  • Group 6: ENG 399 Junior Seminar in Theory and 491 Senior Seminar in Literature
  • Occasionally the department offers a section of topics in British and American Literature (ENG 390), based on a special area of faculty or student interest. The nature of the topic determines whether ENG 390 satisfies a course requirement in group 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6.

Combined Major in English Language and Literature

  • ENG 201 British Literature to 1789; 202 British Literature from 1789; and 204 American Literature
  • One of the following: ENG 399 Junior Seminar in Theory and 491 Senior Seminar in Literature
  • One course each from groups 2, 3, 4, and 5 listed in the full major requirements

Minor in English Language and Literature

Requirements:

  • ENG 201 British Literature to 1789; 202 British Literature from 1789; and 204 American Literature
  • Two 300-level courses chosen in consultation with an adviser

Secondary English Education

English Majors preparing for a career in education take English courses and a series of Education and other courses specified by the Education Department to meet Pennsylvania Department of Education regulations. As early as possible in their college experience, candidates for teacher certification in English should consult the Requirements section of the Education website and the chair of Education regarding specific course requirements. The English Education certification is a grades 7-12 program.


General Studies and Elective Offerings

In addition to offering upper level concentration and special non-concentration programs, Albright’s English Department is a vital part of the College’s liberal arts core – the general studies programs – in the areas of composition and literature. All students at Albright take at least one composition course, usually ENG 102, and most students take both ENG 101 and 102. For other general studies requirements in Foundations, Connections, and Global Connections students may take course from departmental offerings as appropriate.

For General Studies Humanities Foundations credit, the English Department offers a variety of courses, listed as ENG 135, including the following topics:  Ghost Stories, Literature of Fantasy, Dada and Surrealism, The Vampyre, Tragedy, Hitchcock:  Film and Text, American Short Fiction, Comedy, Adolescent Protagonists, Modern American Poetry, Folklore and Fairy Tales.  ENG 380, Modern American Women Poets, may also be taken for Foundations credit.  Other topics and courses may be added to the list.

Our Creative Writing course, ENG 125, may be taken for Fine Arts Foundations credit.

For General Studies Connections credit, the English Department offers a variety of courses, listed as English 235, including the following topics:  Utopian Literature, Novel Englishwomen, Black Women Writers, Latin American Poetry, African Autobiography, Irish Literature, Afro-Caribbean Literature, Shakespeare and Company, Literature of War, Hip-hop, Mean Girls.  Selected courses listed for majors are also available for Connections credit, including the following courses:  ENG 204, Survey of American Literature; ENG 210, African-American Literature; ENG 356, Milton and the Seventeenth Century.  Other topics and courses may be added to the list.

For General Studies Global Connections credit, the English Department offers ENG 234, Adolescent Literature, as well as a number of courses listed as ENG 236, including World Litereature, Irish Arts (a course that includes a trip to Ireland), Latin American Poetry, and Afro-Caribbean Literature.  Other topics and courses may be added to the list.

Nearly all of the department’s offerings have proven to be both popular and enriching elective courses, and many of Albright’s majors in other programs have rounded off their liberal arts experience at the College with courses in, drama, literature, and/or creative writing, or one of the department’s travel courses offered from time to time during Interim session or in the summer to such places as London, Dublin and Italy.

Students interested in supervised creative writing projects may pursue them on an individual study basis after approval by a departmental adviser. Together with the Dean of the College, the English Department maintains a Writing Center where students of all disciplines are welcome to seek assistance in redrafting papers and in improving writing skills. Albright’s Theatre Department offers several dramatic literature courses that may be used to satisfy English concentration requirements. Please see the Theatre section for descriptions of these courses.


Interdisciplinary Major in English-Theatre

  • ENG 201 and 202
  • THR 280
  • One from THR 150, 210, 211, 212, 213
  • THR 288 or 289
  • ENG 354
  • THR 388 and 389
  • One from ENG 350, 352, 355, 356, 357, 366, 368, 372, 373, 374
  • One from ENG 380, 384, 385, 386
  • ENG 399 or 491
  • THR 491
  • Students are advised to take THR 101 as their General Studies Foundations Fine Arts course
  • Students are advised to take ENG204 as one of their General Studies Connections courses

World Languages and Cultures


 

The French Major and Co-Major

Albright College provides you opportunities to acquire in-depth competencies in French and the cultures of the French-speaking world. Through coursework, service learning, study abroad, internships, honors theses, and collaborative research with our faculty, you’ll learn to appreciate cultural differences, to question, and to analyze. You’ll solve problems on a daily basis. You’ll interact with native speakers who share their cultural and linguistic expertise inside and outside the classroom. Learning a new world language is a transformative experience, and we’re here to guide you as your begin your journey.

The vast majority of students who study French at Albright choose to combine it with another discipline. While no one combination dominates in terms of raw numbers, here are some examples of what students have combined French with recently:

  • Accounting
  • Biochemistry
  • Business
  • Business administration
  • Child and family studies
  • Communications
  • Criminology
  • English
  • Environmental studies
  • Fashion merchandising
  • History
  • International business
  • International relations
  • Psychology
  • Secondary education
  • Sociology
  • Spanish

And the list goes on…

Combined Major. To complete the combined major in French, here’s what you need to do.

Take these courses:

  • FRE 201, Intermediate French I (for students who begin in FRE 101)
  • FRE 202, Intermediate French II
  • FRE 301, Advanced French I
  • FRE 302, Advanced French II
  • Two additional courses at the 300 level. Some courses can be replaced by approved study abroad courses.
  • FRE 492, Senior Seminar

Or take these courses:

  • FRE 202, Intermediate French II
  • FRE 301, Advanced French I
  • FRE 302, Advanced French II
  • Three additional courses at the 300 level. Some courses can be replaced by approved study abroad courses.
  • FRE 492, Senior Seminar

Or take these courses:

  • FRE 301, Advanced French I
  • FRE 302, Advanced French II
  • Four additional courses at the 300 level. Some courses can be replaced by approved study abroad courses.
  • FRE 492, Senior Seminar

It’s that simple! By taking these seven courses, you will complete the combined major in French.

Full Major. You can also complete a full major in French. Just take three additional courses at the 300-level. Voilà! C’est simple comme bonjour!

If you have questions, please contact Dr. Abby McGovern, chair of the Department of World Languages and Cultures.


The Spanish Major and Co-Major

Albright College provides you opportunities to acquire in-depth competencies in Spanish and the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Through coursework, service learning, study abroad, internships, honors theses, and collaborative research with our faculty, you’ll learn to appreciate cultural differences, to question, and to analyze. You’ll solve problems on a daily basis. You’ll interact with native speakers who share their cultural and linguistic expertise inside and outside the classroom. Learning a new world language is a transformative experience, and we’re here to guide you as your begin your journey.

The vast majority of students who study Spanish at Albright choose to combine it with another discipline. While no one combination dominates in terms of raw numbers, here are some examples of what students have combined Spanish with recently:

  • Accounting
  • Biochemistry
  • Business
  • Business administration
  • Child and family studies
  • Communications
  • Criminology
  • English
  • Environmental studies
  • Fashion merchandising
  • French
  • History
  • International business
  • International relations
  • Psychology
  • Secondary education
  • Sociology

And the list goes on…

Combined Major. To complete the combined major in Spanish, here’s what you need to do.

Take these courses:

  • SPA 201, Intermediate Spanish I, or SPA 203, Accelerated Intermediate Spanish I
  • SPA 202, Advanced Spanish II, or SPA 204, Accelerated Intermediate Spanish II
  • SPA 301, Advanced Spanish I
  • SPA 302, Advanced Spanish II
  • Two additional courses at the 300 level. Some courses can be replaced by approved study abroad courses.
  • SPA 492, Senior Seminar

Or take these courses:

  • SPA 202, Advanced Spanish II, or SPA 204, Accelerated Intermediate Spanish II
  • SPA 301, Advanced Spanish I
  • SPA 302, Advanced Spanish II
  • Three additional courses at the 300 level. Some courses can be replaced by approved study abroad courses.
  • SPA 492, Senior Seminar

Or take these courses:

  • SPA 301, Advanced Spanish I
  • SPA 302, Advanced Spanish II
  • Four additional courses at the 300 level. Some courses can be replaced by approved study abroad courses.
  • SPA 492, Senior Seminar

It’s that simple! By taking these seven courses, you will complete the combined major in Spanish.

Full Major. You can also complete a full major in Spanish. Just take three additional courses at the 300-level. ¡Así de fácil!

If you have questions, please contact Dr. Abby McGovern, chair of the Department of World Languages and Cultures.


New! The French Interdisciplinary Minor and the Spanish Interdisciplinary Minor

Did you know that by studying French or Spanish you can widen and deepen your understanding of your major field of study?

The French interdisciplinary minor and the Spanish interdisciplinary minor are designed to build a bridge between your French or Spanish studies and your major field of study, enabling you to use primary sources the language you study to discover how topics in your major play out in French- or Spanish-speaking contexts.

The minors allow you the flexibility to substitute one course for a French-themed or Spanish-themed course in your major. It also encourages you to experience French or Spanish outside the classroom by giving you the flexibility to substitute one course for a study abroad course in a French-speaking or Spanish-speaking country. When substitutions are made, you will integrate the material through periodic meetings in French with a member of the French faculty or in Spanish with a member of the Spanish faculty.

This interdisciplinary minor will add value to your major, will benefit your future academic and/or professional needs and will enable you to participate in a wider, global community.

By taking these five courses, you will complete the minor in French or Spanish interdisciplinary studies:

  • FRE 201 or SPA 201/203 (for students who begin in SPA 101)
  • FRE 202 or SPA 202/204
  • FRE 301 or SPA 301
  • FRE 302 or SPA 302
  • One additional FRE or SPA 300-level course. (OPTIONS for this course: ONE approved French-themed or Spanish-themed course in the department of your major or ONE approved study abroad course.

OR

  • FRE 202 or SPA 202/204
  • FRE 301 or SPA 301
  • FRE 302 or SPA 302
  • Two additional FRE or SPA 300-level courses. (OPTIONS for this course: ONE approved French-themed or Spanish-themed course in the department of your major and ONE approved study abroad course.)

OR

  • FRE 301 or SPA 301
  • FRE 302 or SPA 302
  • Three additional French or Spanish 300-level course. (OPTIONS for TWO of three courses: ONE approved French-themed or Spanish-themed course in the department of your major and ONE approved study abroad course.

It’s that simple! By taking these five courses, you will complete your interdisciplinary minor. If you have questions, please contact Dr. Abby McGovern, chair of the Department of World Languages and Cultures.


Foreign Language Education

Majors in French, Latin, or Spanish preparing for a career in education complete requirements for their major and a series of Education and other courses specified by the Education Department to meet Pennsylvania Department of Education regulations. As early as possible in their college experience, candidates for teacher certification in foreign language should consult the Requirements section of the Education website and the chair of Education regarding specific course requirements. and also courses required for certification.  The Foreign Language Education certification is a grades K-12 program.

Political Sciences at Albright

Are you ready to be an informed citizen in an international society? Join us!


Programs

Crime and Justice
International Relations
Legal Studies
Political Science
Public Policy and Administration


Program Requirements

Crime and Justice


Requirements:

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
    (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science requirement)
  • SOC 202 The Criminal Justice System
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning requirement)
    • May take PSY 200 Research Methods I and PSY 201 Research Methods II in place of SOC 210 and 211
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 251 Crime and Deviance
  • Any two of the following:
    – SOC 253 Criminal Investigation and SOC 254 Advanced Criminal Investigation (must take both courses)
    – ANT 310 Crime, Culture and Conflict Resolution
    – SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    – SOC 305 Terrorism
    – SOC 307 Organized Crime
    – SOC 309 Criminal Corrections
    – SOC 311 Domestic Violence
    – SOC 360 Crime & the Media
    – SOC 385 Violence & Victims
  • One of the following:
    – SOC 440 Ethnographics in Crime
    – SOC 450 White Collar Crime
    – SOC 460 Serial Murder
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • POL 101 American Government
  • POL 400-level Senior Seminar in Political Science
  • Two of the following:
    – POL 214 Public Policy
    – POL 216 Law & Society
    – POL 218 Public Administration
    – POL 231/331 Criminal Law
    – POL 310 Metropolitan Politics
  • PSY 100 General Psychology
  • Two of the following:
    – PSY 206 Social Psychology
    – PSY 220 Theories/Treatment of Addictive Behaviors
    – PSY 230 Human Development
    – PSY 240 Child Development
    – PSY 250 Theories of Personality
    – PSY 355 Motivation
    – PSY 390 Adult Psychopathology and Behavior Disorders
    – PSY 391 Child Psychopathology and Behavior Disorders
  • POL 205 Comparative Politics or PSY 291 Cross Cultural Psychology of SOC262 Social Stratification

International Relations


Students are required to take each of the following courses:

  • POL 202: International Relations (Foundations Social Science)
  • POL 205: Comparative Politics (Foundations Social Science)
  • International Institutions—select one of the following:
    • POL 242: Human Rights (Connections Global)
    • POL 352: International Law and Organizations
  • Approved Political Science Study Abroad program. Please see the IR Study Abroad Information Sheet for additional information and substitutions, including approved substitute internships and courses.
  • Conflict and Transnational Challenges—select one of the following:
    • ANT 270: People of the World
    • POL 273: Globalization
    • HIS 315: World War II Era
    • SOC 305: Terrorism
    • SOC 470: Immigration and Transnational Families
  • Global Economy–select one of the following:
    • ECO 233: Comparative Economics
    • ECO 234: Economic Development
    • ECO 301: International Economics and Finance

    Prerequisite: ECO 105

  • POL403: Seminar on US Foreign Policy, POL 420: Seminar on Global Poverty, or approved International Relations seminar

For IR/POL Combined Majors Only:

  • In place if POL 202, take one of the following courses:
    • HIS 215: US/Latin American Relations
    • HIS 237: Gender, Women and Power in the Global South
    • HIS 315: World War II Era
    • POL 242: Human Rights
    • POL 273: Globalization
    • SOC 305: Terrorism
  • In place of POL 205, take one of the following:
    • HIS 211: African History
    • HIS 220: Pirates, Plantations and Sugar: History of the Caribbean
    • HIS 228: Dictators and Revolutionaries in Latin America
    • HIS 232: Russia and the Soviet Union
    • HIS 242: East Asia from 1800 to the Present
    • HIS 256: Introduction to the Modern Middle East
    • HIS 267: Twentieth-century Europe
    • POL 260: The Politics of Russia and Neighboring States
    • POL 345: Latin American Politics

Political Science


Major in Political Science

Requirements

  • POL 101 American Government (counts as General Studies Foundations Social Science)
  • POL 202 Introduction to International Relations
  • POL 205 Comparative Politics
  • POL 206 Political Inquiry
  • POL 207 Research Methods (counts as General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning)
  • POL 315 Political Theory
  • One approved Political Science senior-level seminar
  • Six additional advanced Political Science courses

Interdisciplinary Combined Major in Crime and Justice

The Political Science, Sociology and Psychology departments offer a Crime and Justice interdisciplinary major that focuses on the legal, political, administrative, psychological and sociological analyses of criminal deviance and societal responses to crime. See Crime and Justice under the Sociology Department for requirements.


Combined Major in Political Science

Requirements

  • POL 101 American Government (counts as General Studies Foundations Social Science)
  • POL 202 Introduction to International Relations
  • POL 205 Comparative Politics
  • POL 206 Political Inquiry
  • POL 315 Political Theory
  • One approved Political Science senior-level seminar
  • Two additional advanced Political Science courses

Minor in Political Science

Whether you are planning a career in the bureaucracy, the nonprofit world, or the private sector, government and politics impact you. Appreciating the ways policy is made, realizing how relationships between and among countries affect business and the populace, and understanding power structures are all hallmarks of the political science minor. The minor in political science shall consist of five courses with the following distribution:

  • POL 101, American Government
  • POL 202, International Relations, or POL 205, Comparative Politics
  • Any three additional Political Science courses

International Relations Combined Major

The interdisciplinary major in International Relations provides students you the tools you need to understand and evaluate relationships among nations, states and people as these are affected by conflict, globalization, health, climate changes and other challenges. Students contemplating careers in government, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, intelligence, international business, international law or diplomacy should consider this combined major. For more information, contact Professor Irene Langran, or visit http://www.albright.edu/IR/.
Requirements

  • POL 202 International Relations (POL/IR majors substitute HIS 215, HIS 237, HIS 315, SOC 305, POL 242 or POL273)
  • POL 205 Comparative Politics (POL/IR majors substitute POL 260, 345, HIS 211, HIS 220, HIS 228, HIS 232, HIS 242, HIS 256 or HIS 267))
  • POL 352 International Law and Organizations OR POL 242 Human Rights
  • Approved Political Science study abroad program
  • POL 403 Seminar or an approved International Relations Seminar
  • One of the following:
    • ANT 270 People of the World
    • POL 273 Globalization
    • HIS 315 World War II Era
    • SOC 305 Terrorism
  • One of the following:
    • ECO 233  Comparative Economics
    • ECO 234  Economic Development
    • ECO 301  International Economics

International Relations majors are strongly encouraged to develop facility in languages other than their native language. Students should stay alert to the options provided by independent study with qualified and willing instructors in the departments.


Interdisciplinary Combined Major in Public Health

The interdisciplinary combined major in public health is a liberal arts program in which students will gain a greater understanding of public health on local, national and global levels. The study of public health not only combines perspectives from the social sciences, sciences, mathematics and humanities, it also cultivates critical and analytical skills across disciplines, written and oral communication, teamwork ability, ethical reasoning, and civic knowledge and engagement. This major will benefit students who wish to pursue careers related to public health and the health sciences, law and policy, and other career paths that draw upon multidisciplinary approaches and critical engagement.  To study public health is to engage human biology, socio-economic contexts, personal choices and behaviors, environmental determinants, and political processes on local and global scales. 

Requirements

  • PUH 101 Introduction to Public Health
  • POL/SYN 330 Global Health
  • Statistics course from: BIO 200 Biometry, ECO 207 Business/Economics Statistics, MAT 110 Elementary Statistics, POL 207 Research Methods, PSY 200 Research I, or SOC 211 Statistics
  • PUH 310 Epidemiology
  • Public Health Internship
  • PUH 440 Public Health Capstone
  • One or two additional Public Health courses (students completing an approved Statistics course within their other major must take a second course)
    • HIS 205 History of US Medicine/Public Health
    • HIS 206 History of Urban Public Health
    • POL 214 Public Policy
    • POL 218 Public Administration
    • BIO 234 Anatomy & Physiology I
    • BIO 235 Anatomy & Physiology II
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 203 Human Services
    • SOC 262 Stratification
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
    • PHI 260 Biomedical Ethics
    • LAS 299 Disease, Death and Society in Latin America 1850-1990
    • ESS 325 Geographical Information Systems
    • ANT 303 Food & Culture
    • PSY 206 Social Psychology
    • PSY 230 Human Development
    • REL 236 God and Doctors: Religion, Health and Medicine
    • PSY 290 Diversity Issues
    • PSY 390 Psychopathology
    • Comparative Health Systems
  • BIO 151 General Biology I: Structure & Function is recommended for the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement.  Other Foundations-Natural Science courses are allowed

Public Health Minor

Requirements

  • PUH 101 Introduction to Public Health
  • POL/SYN 330 Global Health
  • Statistics course from: BIO 200 Biometry, ECO 207 Business/Economics Statistics, MAT 110 Elementary Statistics, POL 207 Research Methods, PSY 200 Research I, or SOC 211 Statistics
  • PUH 310 Epidemiology
  • Public Health Internship

Legal Studies Minor

The interdisciplinary minor in Legal Studies is designed to help you develop a thorough understanding of our legal system. For those considering law school, it serves as excellent academic preparation. You study the place of the legal system among our civil institutions, and develop the ability to read, understand and assess critically Supreme Court cases. This minor is open to all students interested in studying our legal system regardless of concentration or career goal. Contact Suzanne Palmer, J.D. for additional information. A total of five courses are required.

Requirements

REQUIRED of all minors:

  • POL 216 Law and Society

Take any TWO of the following:

  • POL 231/331 Criminal Law
  • POL 352 International Law & Organizations
  • POL 371 Constitutional Law
  • POL 372 Civil Liberties
  • POL 412 Law and Public Policy

Take any TWO of the following:

  • BUS 250 or BUS 351 Business Law I or II
  • PHI 150 Critical Thinking/Legal Reasoning (It is highly recommended that this course be taken by Sophomore year for anyone considering taking the LSAT, whether or not the Legal Studies Minor is completed.)
  • PHI 203 Ethics
  • PHI 204 Public Morality
  • PHI 230 Philosophy and Law
  • MUS 345 Music Law
  • POL 282/399 Internship

Secondary Social Studies Education

Students in History or Political Science preparing for a career in social sciences education take History and Political Science courses and a series of Education and other courses specified by the Education Department to meet Pennsylvania Department of Education regulations. As early as possible in their college experience, candidates for teacher certification in social studies should consult the Requirements section of the Education website and the chair of Education regarding specific course requirements. The Social Studies Education certification is a grades 7-12 program.

Public Policy and Administration


Co-Major Requirements:

A total of eight courses as follows:

ECO 105  Principles of Economics

POL 206  Political Inquiry

POL 207  Research Methods

POL 214  Public Policy

POL 218  Public Administration

POL 399  Internship

One Approved Political Science Senior Seminar

One of the following economics courses after completing ECO105: ECO 322 Labor Economics, ECO 324 Environmental Economics, ECO 337 Public Finance and Policy, ECO 383 Urban Economics and Policy

Students who take another research course sequence to fulfill requirements for a different “full major” or “co-major” should consult with political science faculty about approved course substitutions for POL206 and POL207.

Minor Requirements:

A total of five courses as follows:

ECO 105  Principles of Economics

POL 214  Public Policy

POL 218  Public Administration

POL 399  Internship

One of the following economics courses after completing ECO105: ECO 322 Labor Economics, ECO 324 Environmental Economics, ECO 337 Public Finance and Policy, ECO 383 Urban Economics and Policy

Psychology & Sociology at Albright

Explore how humans experience their world through the study of psychology and sociology. Albright offers traditional areas of psychological study and a unique psychobiology program that combines behavioral and natural science approaches to psychology and biology.

Programs

Child and Family Studies
Health Psychology
Psychobiology

  • Behavioral Psychobiology track
  • Molecular Psychobiology track

Psychology

  • Child Development track

Sociology

Accelerated Adult Programs

Addiction Studies
Organizational Behavior/Applied Psychology


Program Requirements

Psychology


Albright offers programs in Psychology and Psychobiology. Students majoring in psychology at Albright can choose to focus on a general psychology program or specialize with an interdisciplinary major in Psychobiology, Health Psychology, or a specialized track in child psychology.

Majors and Minors in the Psychology Department

 

 

Major in Psychology

The bachelor of arts degree program in psychology provides a balance of theoretical and applied courses in the discipline and prepares you for graduate study, professional school, or careers in social services, business, research and educational settings.

Requirements

  • All of the following core requirements:
    • PSY 100: General Psychology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science course)
    • PSY 200: Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (fulfills GS Foundations Quantitative course)
    • PSY 201: Research Methods in Psychology
    • PSY 405 or 406: Senior Seminar
  • One of the following research laboratory courses:
    • PSY 395: Psychological Assessment (recommended for those pursuing careers in clinical or school psychology)
    • PSY 396: Advanced Research Lab in Social, Personality, or Developmental Psychology
    • PSY 397: Advanced Research Lab in Biological, Cognitive, or Evolutionary Psychology
  • Three from Group I (Social, Developmental, and Clinical Approaches):
    • PSY 206: Social Psychology
    • PSY 210: Health Psychology
    • PSY 250: Personality
    • PSY 230: Human Development -OR- PSY240: Child Development
    • PSY 390: Adult Psychopathology -OR- PSY391: Child Psychopathology
  • Three from Group II (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Approaches):
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 305: Behavioral Neuroscience
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
    • PSY 360: Sensation and Perception
    • PSY 306: Special Topics (Biologically-based)
  • Three from Group III (Elective courses):
    • *Any of the above courses not already taken
    • PSY 215: Positive Psychology
    • PSY 220: Theories/Treatment of Addictive Behavior
    • PSY 265: Ecological Psychology
    • PSY 271: Organizational Psychology
    • PSY 290: Diversity
    • PSY 291: Cross-cultural Psychology
    • PSY 294: Drugs, Addictions and Society
    • PSY 306: Special Topic courses in any area
    • PSY 310: Health Behavior Change
    • PSY 321: Close Relationships
    • PSY 330: Human Sexuality
    • PSY 345: Language Development
    • PSY 346: Social Development
    • PSY 377: Epigenetics and Behavior
    • PSY 394: Counseling
    • PSY 303: Sex Roles
    • PSY 401: Fieldwork
    • PSY 396 or 397: Advanced research lab (with a different emphasis as taken above)
    • PSY 281, 381, 481: Independent Study/Advanced Research
    • PSY 282, 382, 482: Internship
  • One related course (200-level or higher) in the social or natural sciences or an additional psychology course (200-level or higher)

Total: 15 courses (2 captured for General Studies)


Combined Major in Psychology   
Students may elect to combine Psychology with any other major. Required courses in Psychology are:

  • All of the following core requirements:
    • PSY 100: General Psychology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science course)
    • PSY 200: Research Design and Analysis I (fulfills GS Foundations Quantitative course)
    • PSY 201: Research Design and Analysis II
    • PSY 405 or 406: Senior Seminar

Note: Sociology co-majors may take SOC210 Research Methods and SOC211 Statistics instead of PSY200 and PSY201, and if so, they must take any 2 additional psychology courses in place of PSY200 and Psy201.

Two from Group I (Social, Developmental, and Clinical Approaches):

    • PSY 206: Social Psychology
    • PSY 210: Health Psychology
    • PSY 250: Personality
    • PSY 230: Human Development -OR- PSY240: Child Development
    • PSY 390: Adult Psychopathology -OR- PSY391: Child Psychopathology
  • Two from Group II (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Approaches):
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 305: Behavioral Neuroscience
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
    • PSY 360: Sensation and Perception
  • One from Group III (Elective courses):
    • *Any of the above courses not already taken
    • PSY 215: Positive Psychology
    • PSY 220: Theories/Treatment of Addictive Behavior
    • PSY 265: Ecological Psychology
    • PSY 271: Organizational Psychology
    • PSY 290: Diversity
    • PSY 291: Cross-cultural Psychology
    • PSY 294: Drugs, Addictions and Society
    • PSY 306: Special Topic courses in any area
    • PSY 310: Health Behavior Change
    • PSY 321: Close Relationships
    • PSY 330: Human Sexuality
    • PSY 345: Language Development
    • PSY 346: Social Development
    • PSY 377: Epigenetics and Behavior
    • PSY 394: Counseling
    • PSY 395: Psychological Assessment
    • PSY 396/397:Advanced research lab
    • PSY 303: Sex Roles
    • PSY 401: Fieldwork
    • PSY 281, 381, 481: Independent Study/Advanced Research
    • PSY 282, 382, 482: Internship

Total: 9 courses (2 captured for General Studies)


Child Development Track
The Psychology Department offers a track in Child Development. This track is primarily for full Psychology majors but may be completed by Combined Psychology majors and students in other majors (such as Child & Family Studies and Psychobiology) who have the prerequisites.

  • Requirements
    • PSY 240: Child Development
    • PSY 391: Child Psychopathology
    • 400-level Child-Focused Psychology course
    • Three from the following, one MUST be a PSY course:
      • PSY 345: Language Development
      • PSY 346: Social Development
      • PSY347: Adolescent Development
      • PSY 306: Psychology Special Topics, Child Focused
      • PSY 395/396/397: Advanced Lab or Assessment, Child Focused Project
      • PSY 401: Child-Focused Field Experience/Internship (if not used for requirement #3)
      • PSY 406: Child-Focused Seminar (if not used for requirement #3)
      • SOC 203: Human Services
      • SOC 261: The Family
      • SOC 302: Juvenile Delinquency
      • SOC 270: Parenting and Technology
      • SOC 271: Work and Family Conflict

Interdisciplinary Major in Psychobiology
The bachelor of science in psychobiology is intended for students with an interest in both the behavioral and natural science approaches to psychology and biology. The major is especially ideal for developing an appreciation of the emerging fields of neuroscience and health psychology. Individuals arrange courses to satisfy their particular interests and prepare for advanced study in psychology, psychobiology, biology, behavioral ecology, veterinary medicine and the health professions (medicine, dentistry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, optometry), or employment in varied areas including pharmaceutical research or sales and allied health professions. Psychobiology majors must declare one of two tracks:  Molecular Psychobiology Track (more biologically oriented) or Behavioral Psychobiology Track (more psychologically oriented). Contact Dr. Keith Feigenson at kfeigenson@albright.edu for more information.

Behavioral Psychobiology Track 
The Behavioral Psychobiology track is more psychologically-oriented and is intended for those pursuing graduate work in health psychology, behavioral research, and some mental health related fields.

  • Psychology core requirements: (6 courses)
    • PSY 100: General Psychology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science course)
    • PSY 200: Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (fulfills GS Foundations Quantitative course)
    • PSY 201: Research Methods in Psychology
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 397: Advanced Research Lab in Biological, Cognitive, or Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 405 or 406: Senior Seminar
  • Biology core requirements:  (2 courses)
    • BIO 151: General Biology I: Structure & Function (fulfills GS Foundations Natural Science course)
    • BIO 203: Introduction to Genetics
  • One from Group I (Social, Developmental, and Clinical Psychology):
    • PSY 206: Social Psychology
    • PSY 210: Health Psychology
    • PSY 250: Personality
    • PSY 230: Human Development -OR- PSY240: Child Development
    • PSY 390: Adult Psychopathology -OR- PSY391: Child Psychopathology
  • Two from Group II (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Psychology):
    • PSY 305: Behavioral Neuroscience
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
    • PSY 360: Sensation and Perception
  • Three from Group III (Biological Science): (one MUST be at least 300 level)
    • BIO 152: General Biology II: Systematics, Ecology, and Evolution
    • BIO 220: Evolution (152 or203)
    • BIO 234: Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • BIO 235: Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • BIO 319: Vertebrate Natural History (152)
    • BIO 327: Histology and Microtechniques (151)
    • BIO 331: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (151)
    • BIO 333: Developmental Biology (151, 203)
    • BIO 337: Comparative Animal Physiology and Ecophysiology (151, 152, CHE105)
  • Two Elective courses:
    • Any PSY course not previously taken
    • Any BIO course not previously taken
    • CHE105- General Analytical Chemistry I
    • Either ANT 342 Human Evolution or ANT 285 The Human Animal

Total: 16 courses (3 captured for General Studies)

Molecular Psychobiology Track 
Students must declare one of two tracks for the Psychobiology major. The Molecular Psychobiology track is more biologically-oriented and is intended for those pursuing graduate work in neuroscience, the medical field, and other related fields.

  • Psychology core requirements:  (5 courses)
    • PSY 100: General Psychology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science course)
    • PSY 200: Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (fulfills GS Foundations Quantitative Reasoning course)
    • PSY 201: Research Methods in Psychology
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 397: Advanced Research Lab in Biological, Cognitive, or Evolutionary Psychology
  • Biology/Chemistry core requirements:  (4 courses)
    • BIO 151: General Biology I: Structure and Function (fulfills GS Foundations Natural Science course)
    • BIO 203: Introduction to Genetics
    • CHE 105: General Analytical Chemistry I
    • CHE 106: General Analytical Chemistry II
  • Two from Group I (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Psychology):
    • PSY 305: Behavioral Neuroscience
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
    • PSY 360: Sensation and Perception
  • Two from Group II (Molecular Biological Sciences):
    • CHE 207:Organic Chemistry I
    • BIO 220: Evolution (BIO152 or 203)
    • BIO 321: Microbiology  (BIO151, 203, CHE207)
    • BIO 322: Cell Biology (BIO151, 203, CHE207)
    • BIO 325: Molecular Genetics (BIO151, 203, CHE207)
    • BIO 327: Histology and Microtechniques (BIO151)
    • BIO 329: Virology (BIO203 and CHE207)
  • One from Group III (Organismal Biological Sciences):
    • BIO 152: General Biology II: Systematics, Ecology, and Evolution
    • BIO 234: Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • BIO 235: Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • BIO 331: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (BIO151)
    • BIO 333: Developmental Biology (BIO151 and 203)
    • BIO 337: Comparative Animal Physiology and Ecophysiology (BIO151, 152, CHE105)
    • BIO 398: Animal & Human Nutrition (BIO151 and CHE207)
  • One Elective course in any PSY or BIO not previously taken
  • One Senior Seminar:
    • PSY 405 or 406: Senior Seminar
    • BIO 490’s: Senior Seminar

Total: 16 courses (3 captured for General Studies)


Interdisciplinary Major in Child and Family Studies
The interdisciplinary major in Child and Family Studies is for students interested in psychosocial approaches to child development and family dynamics. This B.A. degree program, which combines Psychology and Sociology (Family Studies Track), provides the breadth and depth required to work in human services or to pursue graduate studies in human development, psychology or family studies.

Full Course List for Child and Family Studies Major

  • Complete Core Research Methods and Statistics sequence and Senior Seminar (PSY200 or SOC211 fulfills GS quantitative requirement)
    • SOC 210 (Research Methods) & SOC211 (Statistics) & SOC490 (Senior Seminar) OR
    • PSY 200 (Research Design & Analysis I) & PSY201 (Research Design & Analysis II) & PSY405/406 (Senior Seminar)

Psychology Requirements

  • Core Psychology requirement:
    • PSY 100: General Psychology
  • Developmental Psychology Requirement
    • PSY230 (Lifespan Development) or PSY240 (Child Development)
  • One from Group I (Social, Developmental, and Clinical Approaches):
    • PSY206: Social Psychology
    • PSY210: Health Psychology
    • PSY250: Personality
    • PSY390: Adult Psychopathology
    • PSY391: Child Psychopathology
  • One from Group II (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Approaches):
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
  • One from Group III (Child-Focused Elective courses):
    • PSY345: Language Development
    • PSY346: Social Development
    • PSY347: Adolescent Development
  • Psychology Elective: Any additional psychology course not previously taken

 

Sociology Requirements

  • All of the following core requirements:
    • SOC 101: Intro
    • SOC 213: Social Theory
  • Additional specialized family course requirement:
    • SOC 261: The Family
  • One of the following lower level specialized courses:
    • SOC 203: Human Services
    • SOC 270:  Parenting and Technology
    • SOC 271:  Work & Family Conflict
  • Two of the following intermediate specialized courses:
    • SOC 302: Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 311: Domestic Violence
    • ANT 320: Sex, Gender, Culture
  • The following advanced application courses:
    • SOC 470: Immigration & Transnat’l Families

Interdisciplinary Major in Health Psychology

The interdisciplinary major in health psychology provides students with a strong foundation in general psychology, while also providing a concentrated focus on the emerging discipline of health psychology. The program will employ a biopsychosocial perspective in helping students to understand factors that influence health and wellness. Students will use this approach to create treatments that prevent illness and improve health outcomes. In addition, courses provided through other departments, such as Public Health, will enhance student understanding of the medical and mental healthcare systems at a broader policy level. Students graduating with a degree in health psychology will be prepared to pursue careers or graduate study in counseling, nursing, research coordination, and occupational health. Contact Dr. Bridget Hearon, bhearon@albright.edu for more information.

  • All of the following core requirements:
    • PSY100: General Psychology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science course)
    • PSY200: Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (fulfills GS Foundations Quantitative course)
    • PSY201: Research Methods in Psychology
    • PSY405 or 406: Senior Seminar
    • PSY210: Health Psychology
    • PSY205: Biological Psychology
  • PSY390: Adult Psychopathology -OR- PSY391: Child Psychopathology
  • PUH101: Intro to Public Health
  • One of the following research laboratory courses:
    • PSY396: Advanced Research Lab in Social, Personality, or Developmental Psychology
    • PSY397: Advanced Research Lab in Biological, Cognitive, or Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY395: Assessment

Note: Students are encouraged to design a research project relating to health psychology

  • Three Health-Focused Psychology Electives
    • PSY215: Positive Psychology
    • PSY220: Theories and Treatment of Addictive Behaviors
    • PSY305: Behavioral Neuroscience
    • PSY310: Health Behavior Change
    • PSY330: Human Sexuality
    • PSY355: Motivation
    • PSY377: Epigenetics and Behavior
    • Independent study in health psychology or internship (PSY401) in a health-related setting
  • Health-related Psy306 (subject to chair approval)
  • Two Public Health Electives
    • POL/SYN330: Global Health
    • PUH310: Epidemiology
    • HIS205 History of US Medicine/Public Health
    • HIS206 History of Urban Public Health
  • PHI260: Biomedical Ethics
  • SOC203: Human Services
  • SOC311: Domestic Violence
  • ANT303: Food and Culture
  • REL236: God & Doctors: Religion/Health/Medicine

Evolutionary Studies Minor
The Evolutionary Studies Minor is meant to create opportunities for faculty and students at Albright to (a) develop a deep understanding of evolutionary ideas, (b) conduct cross-disciplinary research using evolution as a synthesizing paradigm, and (c) contribute to novel ideas across disciplines guided by evolutionary reasoning. Contact Dr. Susan Hughes at 610-929-6732, shughes@albright.edu for more information.

  • Curriculum:
    • PSY 100: General Psychology
    • BIO 203: Genetics or BIO 152 General Biology II: Systematics, Ecology and Evolution
    • Two of the following:
      • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
      • BIO 220: Evolution
      • ANT 342: Human Evolution
    • One of the following:
      • PSY 319, BIO 220 or ANT 342 (if not already taken from course 3 & 4 options)
      • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
      • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
      • PSY 265/ANT 265: Ecological Psychology
      • BIO 319: Vertebrate Natural History
      • BIO 331: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
      • BIO 494: Mammalian Evolution
      • ANT 285: The Human Animal
      • ANT 320: Sex/Gender/Culture
      • PHI 140: Human Nature
  • Additional courses: If special Seminars or Special Topics classes arise that may be pertinent to this program, students may petition their advisors to have other courses count toward this program.
  • Includes opportunities for Independent Study and involvement in faculty research to fulfill program requirements.

Sociology & Anthropology


Perhaps the most comprehensive of the social sciences, sociology is concerned with the analysis and explanation of social phenomena. These phenomena, which range from the socialization of the child to criminal behavior and cultural change, are studied and investigated using a wide variety of research techniques. Through formalized standards of inquiry, sociologists focus on the relationships between the parts of social systems and how the systems are formulated, how they function, and how they are related to the everyday lives of human beings.

The Sociology and Anthropology Department offers four tracks:

The department also supports the following interdisciplinary majors:

In addition, students can combine each of the four tracks mentioned above with another academic discipline to form a combined major. The department also offers minors in Anthropology,  Criminology and Sociology.

Core Courses

This diversity of majors covers a wide range of topics, but they are unified by a set of core requirements for all students in the department (with the exception of the environmental studies interdisciplinary major). These core courses include:

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (or ANT 101 for anthropology majors)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics
  • SOC 213 Social Theory (anthropology students have other course options to satisfy this requirement)
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar

(Some substitutions are allowed in the above for students co-majoring in another social science with similar required courses and those with interdisciplinary majors. These are noted below).

Appropriate academic skills are also ensured at each level in that all 300-level courses (excluding 400-level Anthropology) require a sophomore standing or above as a pre-requisite, and all 400-level sociology (excluding 400-level Anthropology) courses require a junior standing or above. Courses at the 400 level also have as a prerequisite that all other core courses be completed in addition to at least one additional 300-level course. Many other prerequisites exist for individual courses to ensure that students can build on a specific set of foundational skills in their upper-level courses.


Anthropology Major

The anthropology major expands the focus of investigation to include biological, cultural and ecological forces that have effects on humans. From human evolution to cultural diversity to ecological constraints, students learn to incorporate a broad array of information and perspectives to arrive at a more complete and complex understanding of the human species. Four core courses provide a comprehensive foundation about the essential constraints that act on mankind. Additionally, two electives must be completed to enhance the students’ understanding in particular areas (conflict, sex, evolution). Finally, students complete their anthropological courses with an independent study in which they design and conduct a semester-long research project that requires them to gather and assess data in one particular area of human activity.

Due to the broad and multidisciplinary nature of anthropology, students completing this major will be prepared to undertake graduate studies in a variety of disciplines including anthropology, sociology, law, medicine and a number of other social, environmental and biological sciences. Likewise, they will be prepared to enter careers in a variety of areas, such as international relations, international business, education, medicine, public policy, law, labor organization, government, environmental resource management, economics and development, social work and counseling.

Requirements

  • ANT 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science requirement)
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning Requirement)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods or ESS 298 Ecological and Anthropological Field Study in Peru
  • One of the following:
    • PSY 205 Biological Psychology
    • SOC 213 Social Theory
    • PSY 319 Evolutionary Psychology
  • ANT 285 The Human Animal
  • ANT 310 Crime, Culture and Conflict Resolution
  • ANT 320 Sex, Gender and Culture (ANT 303 Food and Culture can be substituted for either ANT 310 or ANT 320)
  • ANT 342 Human Evolution
  • ANT 382/482 Internship (or an approved course)
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar (students in the anthropology major may substitute an independent study with permission from the department)
  • One of the following:
    • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 231 Cults
    • SOC 251 Crime and Deviance
    • SOC 261 The Family
    • SOC 262 Social Stratification
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
  • One of the following:
    • ANT 270 People of the World
    • ANT 303 Food and Culture
    • ANT 365 Ecological Psychology
  • Two of the following:
    • ANT 270 People of the World (if not used above)
    • ANT 280 Martinique Studies
    • ANT 303 Food and Culture (if not used above)
    • ANT 365 Ecological Psychology (if not used above)
    • ESS 298 Ecological and Anthropological Field Study in Peru (if not used above)
    • LAS 160 Caribbean Culture
    • LAS 225 Introduction to Latin American Studies
    • LAS 275 Service Learning in the Dominican Republic
    • LAS 285 Ritual in Latin America
    • LAS 352 Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World
    • REL 250 Judaism: Religion and Culture
    • REL 251 Islam: Ideals and Realities
    • REL 257 Buddhism Across Cultures
    • REL 266 Asian Cultural Life
    • REL 267 African and African-American Religious Traditions
    • REL 268 The Sacred Paths of Native Americans
    • SOC 331 Sociology of Mass Media and Popular Culture
    • SOC 395 Comparative Cultures: Ecuador

Combined Anthropology Major

Requirements

  • ANT 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science requirement)
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning Requirement)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods or ESS 298 Ecological and Anthropological Field Study in Peru
  • One of the following:
    • PSY 205 Biological Psychology
    • SOC 213 Social Theory
    • PSY 319 Evolutionary Psychology
  • ANT 342 Human Evolution
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar (students in the anthropology major may substitute an independent study with permission from the department)
  • Two of the following:
    • ANT 285 The Human Animal
    • ANT 310 Crime, Culture and Conflict Resolution
    • ANT 320 Sex, Gender and Culture
  • One of the following:
    • ANT 270 People of the World
    • ANT 280 Martinique Studies
    • ANT 303 Food and Culture
    • ANT 265 Ecological Psychology

Anthropology Minor

The anthropology minor enables students to gain a holistic understanding of both biological and cultural effects on humans. The courses in the anthropology minor provide a basis for understanding the effects of these forces on humans cross-culturally in a variety of habitats. Topics of investigation include violence, sex, cooperation and ecological relationships. Contact Prof. Barty Thompson.

Requirements:

  • ANT 101
  • One from ANT 342 or ANT 285
  • Three from ANT 270, 303, 310, 320, 365

Criminology Major

The criminology major exposes students to the sociological perspective through study of the methodology of the field, basic theoretical paradigms, as well as the study of socialization, culture, deviance and conformity, social organization and societal development, complex organizations, and the principles of stratification and other forms of social inequality. In addition, students study the social problem of crime and deviance within the context of other social problems, e.g., family dysfunction, poverty, education, racism, gender issues, and the sociology of work and occupations. Courses that concentrate on crime and delinquency are concerned with:

· The study of behaviors defined as criminally deviant in both American society and other developed and developing societies

· The traditional and contemporary theoretical explanations of both the process of defining criminal behavior and the social and interpersonal decisions and circumstances related to engaging in criminalized deviant behavior

Students study the methodology of social research used in the study of these forms of deviance including secondary data analysis and empirical research construction and design. A course in parametric and nonparametric statistics provides students with additional analytic tools for use in collecting and studying aggregate- as well as individual-level data on crime and delinquency.

Students are able to use internship opportunities to experience and participate in the activities of an organization or agency whose activities relate to the application of the program content. Internship opportunities can be either in a local organization or agency or in association with an off-campus experience such as the Washington Center or the Philadelphia Center. The senior seminar provides students a capstone course integrating the various components of the program and incorporating the opportunity to complete a major empirical study of some facet of crime and delinquency of interest to them.

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • SOC 251 Crime & Deviance
  • SOC 202 The Criminal Justice System
  • SOC 382/482 Internship, travel abroad course, or a 400-level approved substitution
  • Two of the following:
    • ANT 101 Intro to Cultural Anthropology
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 230 Cultural Sociology
    • SOC 231 Cults & New Religious Movements
    • SOC 261 The Family
    • SOC 262 Social Stratification
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
    • ANT 285 The Human Animal
  • Four of the following:
    • SOC 253 Criminal Investigation and SOC 254 Advanced Criminal Investigation (must take both courses to satisfy one of the requirements from this list)
    • SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 305 Terrorism
    • SOC 307 Organized Crime
    • SOC 309 Crim. Corrections
    • ANT 310 Crime, Culture, Conflict Resolution
    • SOC 311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC 360 Crime and the Media
    • SOC 385 Violence & Victims
  • One of the following:
    • SOC 440 Ethnographies in Crime and Deviance
    • SOC 450 White-Collar Crime
    • SOC 460 Serial Murder

Study Abroad courses are also encouraged as electives.


Combined Criminology Major

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • SOC 251 Crime & Deviance
  • One of the following intermediate specialized courses:
    • SOC 253 Criminal Investigation and SOC 254 Advanced Criminal Investigation (must take both courses to satisfy one of the requirements from this list)
    • SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 305 Terrorism
    • SOC 307 Organized Crime
    • SOC 309 Crim. Corrections
    • ANT 310 Crime, Culture, Conflict Resolution
    • SOC 311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC 360 Crime and the Media
    • SOC 385 Violence & Victims
  • One of the following advanced application courses:
    • SOC 440 Ethnographies in Crime and Deviance
    • SOC 450 White-Collar Crime
    • SOC 460 Serial Murder

Because this is a combined major there are relatively few topically based requirements.  Therefore it is strongly encouraged that criminology combined majors use their electives to take additional topical courses


Criminology Minor

The criminology minor exposes students to the sociological perspective through study of the methodology of the field, basic theoretical paradigms, as well as the study of socialization, culture, deviance and conformity, social organization and societal development, complex organizations, and the principles of stratification and other forms of social inequality. In addition, students study the social problem of crime and deviance within the context of other social problems such as family dysfunction, poverty, education, racism, gender issues, and the sociology of work and occupations.

Requirements:

  • SOC101 Introduction to Sociology
  • SOC251 Crime and Deviance
  • Three of the following courses:
    • SOC202 The Criminal Justice System
    • SOC210 Research Methods
    • SOC211 Social Statistics
    • SOC213 Social Theory
    • SOC253 Criminal Investigation
    • SOC254 Advanced Criminal Investigation
    • SOC302 Juvenile Deliquency
    • SOC305 Terrorism
    • SOC307 Organized Crime
    • SOC309 Criminal Corrections
    • SOC311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC360 Crime and the Media
    • SOC385 Violence and Victims
    • ANT310 Crime Culture, Conflict Resolution


Family Studies Major

The family studies major provides students with an extensive academic understanding of family systems and their relationship to the development and social participation of their members as well as the skills to evaluate and conduct research on topics related to family interaction. The course requirements for students in this program focus on understanding the family as a social group and the dynamics of family participation in American society as well as in a global context. Students are introduced to the theory of group formation, the external forces that impinge upon family functioning and the methods that can be used to measure and anticipate family dysfunctions. Students who combine family studies with another major may enter the employment market immediately upon graduation in fields such as preschool education, elementary education, and residential treatment and care, or may pursue a graduate degree in family studies.

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Quantitative Reasoning course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • SOC 203 Human Services for Families and Children
  • SOC 261 The Family
  • SOC 270 Parenting & Technology or SOC 271 Work & Family Conflict
  • SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
  • SOC 311 Domestic Violence
  • ANT 320 Sex, Gender, & Culture
  • SOC 382/482 Internship, travel abroad course, or a 400-level approved substitution
  • Two of the following:
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 230 Cultural Sociology
    • SOC 251 Crime & Deviance
    • SOC 262 Social Stratification
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
    • ANT 101 Introduction to Anthropology
    • ANT 285 The Human Animal
  • One of the following:
    • SOC 470 Immigration & Transnational Families

Combined Family Studies Major

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Quantitative Reasoning course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • SOC 261 The Family
  • One of the following intermediate courses:
    • SOC 203 Human Services for Families and Children
    • SOC 270 Parenting & Technology
    • SOC 271 Work and Family Conflict
    • SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC ANT 320 Sex, Gender, & Cultur
  • One of the following advanced application courses:
    • SOC 470 Immigration & Transnational Families

Students are also encouraged to complete an internship as an elective.


General Sociology Major

The sociology major is designed for students who are interested in a general, though intensive, study of sociological methodology, theory and content areas. Students with a major in sociology can find employment in business and government, in human service organizations and international organizations, as politicians, educators, journalists and social researchers, and in foreign service. The general sociology major is intended primarily for students who plan to attend law school or pursue graduate study in sociology. It is also intended for those who seek careers in business, governmental or community service occupations for which graduate school training is unnecessary.

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning Course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • SOC 382/482 Internship, travel abroad course, or a 400-level approved substitution
  • Two of the following:
    • ANT 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 202 The Criminal Justice System
    • SOC 230 Cultural Sociology
    • SOC 261 The Family
    • SOC 262 Social Stratification
    • ANT 285 The Human Animal
  • One of the following:
    • ANT 310 Crime, Culture and Conflict Resolution
    • ANT 320 Sex, Gender and Culture
  • Two of the following:
    • SOC 203 Human Service for Families & Children
    • SOC 231 Cults & New Religious Movements
    • SOC 251 Crime and Deviance
    • SOC 270 Parenting & Technology or SOC 271 Work and Family Conflict
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
  • Three of the following:
    • SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 305 Terrorism
    • SOC 307 Organized Crime
    • SOC 311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC 331 Mass Media & Popular Culture
    • SOC 332 Sport & Leisure
    • SOC 333 Sociology of Religion
    • SOC 334 Religion & Popular Culture
    • SOC 360 Crime and the Media
    • SOC 385 Violence and Victims
  • One of the following:
    • SOC 430 Collective Behavior & Social Movements
    • SOC 440 Ethnographies in Crime and Deviance
    • SOC 450 White Collar Crime
    • SOC 460 Serial Murder

Combined General Sociology Major

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • One of the following:
    • ANT 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 202 The Criminal Justice System
    • SOC 230 Cultural Sociology
    • SOC 251 Crime & Deviance
    • SOC 261 The Family
    • SOC 262 Social Stratification
    • ANT 285 Human Animal
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
  • One additional 300-level sociology course
  • One additional 400-level sociology course

Sociology Minor

Sociology is the scientific study of people and groups. This focus can be as narrow as looking at short interactions between people in passing or as complex as analyzing global social processes. Perhaps the most comprehensive of the social sciences, sociology is concerned with the analysis and explanation of the most challenging issues of our time: street crime and delinquency, corporate downsizing and dislocation, child abuse and dysfunctional families, welfare and education reform, racism and ethnic cleansing, and problems of peace and war. The sociology minor provides significant study of the discipline through a selection of 5 courses.

Students are required to complete SOC101 “Introduction to Sociology” and four additional courses with a SOC- or ANT- prefix.

Sciences at Albright

A science student conducts an experiment during class at Albright College in Reading, Pennsylvania.

Where Can Your Science Degree from Albright Take You? Almost Anywhere!

The demand for scientists is expected to soar, with more than 110,000 jobs likely to be added in the coming decade.

Albright College will prepare you well for the opportunities that lie ahead.

We offer seven distinct science programs that enable you to pursue your passions. And whichever major course of study you choose, you will get the hands-on experience that will truly set you apart. You’ll work closely with faculty. You’ll explore exciting new ideas and conduct lab experiments in our 78,000 square-foot, state-of-the-art science center. And you’ll be challenged every step of the way.

Whether you plan to go on to graduate school or go directly into the workforce, we will help you find the fit that is right for you.


Biology Program

Biology majors at Albright have gone to work in a wide range of exciting fields – from medicine to biotechnology to education and beyond. Our goal is to help all our students develop their critical-thinking skills and foster a comprehensive knowledge of and appreciation for the many dimensions of the biological sciences.

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“I could not have asked for a better research experience.”

— Sarah Hosler ’20

Biochemistry Program

Albright boasts a 100% placement rate for chemistry and biochemistry majors who apply to graduate school. Those who look to start their careers after graduation have landed positions at Penn State Health, GSK, Dow, and many other prestigious organizations. Find out what makes a biochemistry degree from Albright so valuable.

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Environmental Science Program

If you want to be at the forefront of environmental action and change? Albright College is a great place to start. Our rigorous curriculum and hands-on learning will give you the knowledge and insights to make a difference in government, consulting, and private industry.

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Enviornmental sciecne student holding sample
plant samples in lab

Chemistry Program

From answering the world’s energy needs to finding new cures, the world is looking at today’s chemists for answers. At Albright, we will prepare you exceptionally for that challenge. Here, you will gain valuable experience in the classroom and in the lab. And working with our passionate faculty and students, you will graduate ready to conquer the toughest challenges.

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“It was humbling to have so many of my professors and mentors write letters of recommendation on my behalf. I’m extremely thankful to have been able to build relationships with each one of them during my time at Albright.”

— Erika Hollinger ’22
Early Acceptance Medical School Student


Student testing sample
student pouring sample

Marine and Aquatic Science Program

If you are majoring in biology, biochemistry, or environmental science, you may want to consider a minor in marine and aquatic science. The coursework will enhance your knowledge of biological systems, with a focus on water-based habits. Our Environmental Science majors in particular have found that this minor opens many doors to graduate school.

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Physics Program

Albright physics grads are simply in a league of their own. A full 100% of our students are accepted to graduate school; 100% pass the PRAXIS exam and 75% who take the GRE for graduate school score at least 780 out of 800. Find out what makes Albright’s physics program so elite.

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FACT: 100% of chemistry/biochemistry majors are accepted to graduate school or begin a scientific career following graduation.


Psychobiology Program

The bachelor of science in psychobiology is ideal for developing an appreciation of the emerging fields of neuroscience and health psychology. This major will prepare you for a wide range of careers, including psychology, psychobiology, biology, veterinary medicine, and the health professions, to name just a few.

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Program Requirements

Biology


The biology major allows you to develop a comprehensive knowledge of, and appreciation for, the many dimensions of the biological sciences and the close relationship of biology to other scientific disciplines, such as mathematics, chemistry and physics.

Biology majors focus in general biology, biotechnology, or marine and aquatic science, and often pursue interdisciplinary or dual majors. Biochemistry and psychobiology are the most frequently chosen combinations, but students also combine biology with such other majors as history, business administration and Spanish. You also may choose a biology education program that leads to certification to teach high school biology in Pennsylvania.

Special affiliations/agreements exist between Albright College and institutions such as Penn State (Early Assurance Program with Hershey Medical School).

Some Biology majors declare interest in Nursing or enter the 3+1 Medical Laboratory Science program.

The Department also offers a major in Environmental Science.

Students may choose the Marine and Aquatic Science Program, a specific course sequence that offers opportunities to study a range of topics from the ecophysiology of marine organisms to wetland and watershed restoration. Field study is conducted in nearby lakes and rivers and at coastal locations including Delaware Bay and Chesapeake Bay. The Marine and Aquatic Science Program is typically combined with either the Biology or the Environmental Science majors.


Requirements for the Biology Major

  • A total of 10 courses in biology, including BIO 151, 152, 203, and one 400-level course.
  • No more than two courses at the 100-level may be counted toward the area of concentration.
  • Biology majors must pass both of the introductory courses (BIO151 and 152), earning a minimum average grade of 2.0 over the two courses, or have permission of the Biology Department chair, in order to enroll in other biology courses.
  • Seniors must take the department exit exam as a graduation requirement.

In addition, one course from each of the following three groups must be taken:

  • Group I (BIO 211, 214, 312, 315, 318, 319, and 389)
  • Group II (BIO 220, 321, 322, 325, 327, and 329)
  • Group III (BIO 234, 235, 331, 333, and 337)
  • Within the context of these guidelines, students may freely elect any biology course or CHE 325 to meet the 10-course requirement.
  • MAT 131 or BIO 200
  • CHE 207 and 208

Requirements for the Combined Major in Biology

  • A total of seven courses in biology, including BIO 151, 152, 203, and one 400-level course.
  • Biology majors must pass both of the introductory courses (BIO151 and 152), earning a minimum average grade of 2.0 over the two courses, or have permission of the Biology Department chair, in order to enroll in other biology courses.
  • Seniors must take the department exit exam as a graduation requirement.

In addition, one course from each of the following three groups must be taken:

  • Group I (BIO 211, 214, 312, 315, 318, and 319)
  • Group II (BIO 220, 321, 322, 325, 327, and 329)
  • Group III (BIO 234, 235, 331, 333, and 337)

Interdisciplinary Majors in Biology

The department participates in formal interdisciplinary majors, such as psychobiology, biochemistry, and environmental science. Certain biology majors, such as those anticipating entrance into cooperative forestry, environmental studies, or teacher education programs, may include a geology course as a part of their program, upon approval of the department chair. Students interested in pursuing teacher certification in biology must consult the chair of the Education Department regarding specific requirements for the program.


Requirements for the Biotechnology Track

Albright offers a special track in biotechnology. This track is primarily for biology majors but may be completed by students in other majors (such as biochemistry and psychobiology) who have the prerequisites.

Requirements

  • Six of the following courses, with at least one being a 400-level seminar:
    • BIO 321, 322, 325, 327, 329, 495, 498, 499
    • CHE 325 and 326

Biology students in the biotechnology track must meet the following requirements:

  • BIO 151, 152, and 203
  • The six biotechnology courses listed above
  • One course from Group I or Group III
  • MAT 131 or BIO 200
  • CHE 207 and 208

Requirements for the Marine and Aquatic Science Minor

In addition to completing the requirements for the biology or environmental science majors, students electing to complete the marine and aquatic science minor must complete the following courses:

  • BIO 211
  • BIO 312 or BIO 315
  • BIO 337
  • BIO 318

In addition to the above requirements, students are strongly encouraged to seek an experiential, off-campus experience in marine science. Consult Dr. Bryce Brylawski for more information.


Independent Research

Independent research under the supervision of a member of the Biology Department is strongly encouraged. Recent independent research projects have included studies on bat ecology and echolocation, ultrastructure of insect visual receptors, the ecology of area streams, lakes and wetlands, the distribution of endangered species of mammals, and cloning of genes using recombinant DNA techniques. Such projects involve field trips to nearby ecosystems and the use of scientific equipment and techniques, such as a scanning electron microscope, epifluorescence microscope, biological safety cabinets for sterile cell culture, ultramicrotome, computer-assisted recording of physiological variables, and/or amplification and electrophoresis of DNA and proteins. A Geographic Information Systems (GIS) computer laboratory, a greenhouse, and faculty-student research space support laboratory experimentation in many courses and independent study projects.


Secondary Biology Education

Biology Majors preparing for a career in education take Biology courses and a series of Education and other courses specified by the Education Department to meet Pennsylvania Department of Education regulations. As early as possible in their college experience, candidates for teacher certification in Biology should consult the Requirements section of the Education website and the chair of the Education Department regarding specific course requirements. The Biology Education certification is a grades 7-12 program.


Department Policy on Student Absences and Make-up Work

Lecture:

Students are expected to attend every lecture. Class attendance and on time arrival is necessary but not sufficient to achieve success. Please refer to individual class syllabi for specific penalties for tardiness and unexcused absences. Students should not plan events or schedule appointments that conflict with class. The biology faculty may excuse an absence due to athletic games (not practices), scheduled performances (e.g., band or choir), or class field trips. Other non-emergency cases will require prior approval of the instructor.

Requests for a non-emergency excused absence should be submitted at least one week in advance. Please contact the instructor as early as possible in the semester to determine a course of action. Failure to make arrangements before missing a class for a non-emergency reason will always be considered an unexcused absence.

If missing class is unavoidable due to an illness or other emergency, the student should make every effort to notify the instructor beforehand. The absence will only be excused if written verifiable documentation is provided within two business days of returning to classes.

Exams and quizzes missed for an excused reason must be made-up within one week of the student’s return to classes unless otherwise exempted (e.g., appropriate medical conditions such as concussion or hospitalization). Assignments due during the missed class meeting(s) are to be submitted to the instructor the first day the student returns to classes. Failure to properly follow these guidelines as described will result in a grade of zero for the exam or assignment in question.

Laboratory:

Attendance in lab is mandatory unless otherwise stated by the course instructor or indicated in the lab schedule (e.g., open labs). A 2.5% penalty will be assessed on the course total for the first unexcused absence from lab and an additional 5% penalty for each subsequent absence.

Students should not plan events that conflict with lab. The biology faculty may excuse an absence due to athletic games (not practices), scheduled performances (e.g., band or choir), or class field trips. Other non-emergency cases will require prior approval of the instructor.

Requests for a non-emergency excused absence should be submitted at least one week in advance. Please contact the instructor as early as possible in the semester to determine a course of action. Failure to make arrangements before missing a lab for a non-emergency reason will always be considered an unexcused absence.

If missing lab is unavoidable due to an illness or other emergency, the student should make every effort to notify the instructor beforehand. The absence will only be excused if written verifiable documentation is provided within two business days of returning to classes. Missed lab penalties will be applied after the documentation window has expired.

Make-up labs will not be offered. Lab practical exams must be made up later the same calendar week of the original exam date.

Students must be in lab at the designated start time. Each late arrival will result in a 1% penalty applied to the lab portion of the course grade. Late arrivals after the first 20 minutes will not be admitted and the above missed lab penalties will apply. Unexcused early departures (prior to the completion of all lab work) will likewise result in a 1% penalty applied to the lab portion of the course grade.

Chemistry & Biochemistry


Major in Chemistry
Requirements

  • CHE 105 and 106 (should be completed in the first year)
  • CHE 207 and 208
  • CHE 321, 322, 323, 324, 325
  • CHE 411 and 412
  • MAT 131 and 132 (should be completed in the first year)
  • PHY 201 and 202
  • A research experience is recommended.

Completion of these requirements for the degree results in accreditation in chemistry by the Committee on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society.

Students interested in graduate work in chemistry may wish to consider a course in computer science and additional courses in mathematics and physics.


Interdisciplinary Major in Biochemistry
An interdisciplinary program for students interested in biochemistry is specially designed for those who plan ON professional careers in medicine, medical technology, pharmacology, bacteriology, cellular biology, molecular biology, microbiology, toxicology or physiology.

Requirements

  • CHE 105 and 106
  • CHE 207 and 208
  • CHE 321, 322, 325, 326
  • BIO 151 and 203
  • One of the following
    • BIO 321
    • BIO 322
    • BIO 325
    • BIO 327
    • BIO 329
  • MAT 131 and 132
  • PHY 201 and 202
  • One of the following:
    • CHE 411
    • CHE 412
    • CHE 420
    • BIO 490
    • BIO 495
    • BIO 496
    • BIO 498
  • A research experience is recommended.

Biochemistry majors who wish to receive accreditation in biochemistry by the Committee on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society must elect CHE 323 and 324 in addition to the required courses and select either CHE411 or CHE412 as their 400-level course. Students interested in graduate work in biochemistry and related fields may wish to consider additional courses from the 400-level courses (listed above) or from CHE 323 and 324 and BIO 321, 322 and 333.

Since biochemistry is already an interdisciplinary program, no courses are dropped from this program to create a combined program in biochemistry. However, this does not preclude you from combining biochemistry with another program.


Environmental Chemistry
Our program in environmental chemistry provides a sound general background in chemistry with a specific emphasis on the chemistry of the environment. It prepares you for graduate programs in chemistry, environmental chemistry and environmental science; for immediate employment in solving environmental problems; or for further study in a variety of other professional programs. The program emphasizes practical experience in solving environmental problems.

Requirements

  • CHE 105 and 106
  • CHE 207 and 208
  • CHE 321, 322, 323, 324
  • CHE 420
  • MAT 131 and 132
  • PHY 201 and 202
  • BIO 151 and 152
  • ESS 101 and 400
  • A research experience is recommended.

Students interested in graduate work in environmental chemistry and related fields may wish to consider elective courses from the following:

  • BIO 211, 381, 481 and 482
  • CHE 325, 326, 381, 411, 412, 481 and 482
  • CHE 255 (formerly IDS 255).

Secondary Chemistry Education

Chemistry Majors preparing for a career in education take Chemistry courses and a series of Education and other courses specified by the Education Department to meet Pennsylvania Department of Education regulations. As early as possible in their college experience, candidates for teacher certification in Chemistry should consult the Requirements section of the Education website and the chair of Education regarding specific course requirements. The Chemistry Education certification program is a grades 7-12 program.


Combined Major in Chemistry
Requirements

  • CHE 105 and 106
  • CHE 207
  • CHE 321 or CHE 322
  • Two of the following
    • CHE 323
    • CHE 324
    • CHE 325
  • One 400 level chemistry
  • MAT 131

Minor in Chemistry
Requirements

  • CHE 105 and 106
  • CHE 207
  • Two of the following
    • CHE 321 or CHE 322
    • CHE 323
    • CHE 324
    • CHE 325

Environmental Science


The interdisciplinary nature of the environmental science major (see interdisciplinary studies) allows students to address a wide range of contemporary questions through the natural sciences of biology, ecology, earth sciences, chemistry, the social sciences including political science, sociology, economics, and psychology and the humanities of history and philosophy. The major is designed for science students wishing to pursue careers in environmental research/technology and resource management or pursue graduate study in an environmental field.

Requirements:

Environmental Science majors must take:

ESS 101 and 400

Seven courses within the science/math core:
– BIO 152 and either BIO 151 or BIO 203
– BIO 200 (fulfills general studies quantitative reasoning requirement)
– BIO 211
– CHEM 105 (fulfills general studies natural science requirement)
– CHEM 106 and 207

ESS 325

Two courses from each of the following three groups:
– Biological Group: BIO 214, BIO 220, BIO 246, BIO 318, BIO 319, BIO 337, BIO 389, BIO 491, BIO 494, ESS 298
– Physical Science Group: BIO 312, BIO/ESS 315, ESS 205, ESS 310
– Socio-Political-Cultural Group:  ANT 365, ANT 285, POL 214, POL 321, ECO 224, HIS 280, PHI 270, PSY 350, REL 280, SOC 291, ESS 260, ESS 298

Two of the four choices from the biological and physical science groups must be field-based laboratory courses. Students should be aware that some graduate programs in the environmental fields also require a semester of calculus and physics and two semesters of organic chemistry. Students are also encouraged to participate in a study abroad field course (BIO 389 – Tropical Field Ecology of Costa Rica, ESS 298 – Ecological and Anthropological Field Study in Peru or a similar study abroad experience approved by the Biology Department). Students interested in the Environmental Science major should contact Professors Osgood or Mech in the Biology Department.

Physics


The Department of Physics offers a flexible course of study that prepares you for success in a wide range of technically related fields. Opportunities after graduation include graduate study, industrial research and development, engineering, teaching, technical management and software development. We’ll give you an excellent education in the fundamentals of physics, with special emphasis on strong mathematical skills, advanced laboratory training and collaborative student-faculty research.
You can choose from among three major tracks of study:

  • General physics, in preparation for graduate study in physics or for work in industry
  • Optical physics, in preparation for a career in industrial research and development or engineering, or for graduate study in physics/optics
  • Secondary education certification in physics, in preparation for certification by the state of Pennsylvania as a high school physics teacher

Physics majors interested in graduate programs are encouraged to take courses beyond the basic requirements. Since requirements for graduate programs vary, you are encouraged to seek advice from faculty members in the department. Students interested in pursuing teacher certification in physics must consult the chair of the Department of Education regarding specific requirements for the program.

 

Requirements for the General Physics track:
First Year:

  • MAT 131, 132
  • Students with strong high school preparation may take PHY 201, 202

Second Year:

  • PHY 201, 202
  • MAT 233, 334
  • PHY 255 (formerly IDS 255)

Third Year:

  • PHY 203, 251, 340

Fourth Year:

  • PHY 262, 351, 431, 441, 490

Requirements for the Optical Physics track:
First Year:

  • MAT 131, 132
  • Students with strong high school preparation may take PHY 201, 202
  • OPT 101 (optional)

Second Year:

  • PHY 201, 202
  • MAT 233, 334
  • PHY 255 (formerly IDS 255)

Third Year:

  • PHY 203
  • OPT 241, 261

Fourth Year:

  • OPT 324, 431
  • One from OPT 101, 362, 400, 442, PHY 262
  • PHY 351, 441, 490

Secondary Physics Education

Physics Majors preparing for a career in education take Physics courses and a series of Education and other courses specified by the Education Department to meet Pennsylvania Department of Education regulations. As early as possible in their college experience, candidates for teacher certification in English should consult the Requirements section of the Education website and the chair of Education regarding specific course requirements. The Physics Education certification is a grades 7-12 program.


Co-Major in Physics
Requirements

  • PHY 201, 202, 203
  • PHY 340, 351
  • PHY 441
  • MAT 131, 132, 233
  • PHY 255 (formerly IDS 255)

Co-Majors in Optical Physics
Requirements

  • PHY 201, 202
  • OPT 241, 261
  • OPT 431
  • Two from OPT 324, 362, 400, 442, PHY 351, 441

A student may combine optics with any other major. However, the high level of computational background required for most optics courses favors combining with mathematics.

The mathematics courses required are:

  • MAT 131, 132
  • MAT 233
  • MAT 250, 334, 435, 438
  • MAT 491