Sociology & Anthropology

Sociology graphic

 

To study sociology is to study society. As a social science – the science of studying humans – sociology focuses on the study of people and groups. This focus can be as narrow as looking at short interactions between people in passing or as complex as analyzing global social processes. Perhaps the most comprehensive of the social sciences, sociology is concerned with the analysis and explanation of the most challenging issues of our time: street crime and delinquency, corporate downsizing and dislocation, child abuse and broken families, welfare and education reform, racism and ethnic cleansing, and problems of peace and war.

The study of sociology and anthropology at Albright combines service learning and field experience with traditional classroom instruction to provide a well-balanced academic program that prepares you for the situations and environments you will encounter after graduating.

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology is committed to the tradition of the Liberal Arts and Sciences. We seek to ensure that graduates of the department are amply equipped with skills in analytical thinking, writing and research, and with an understanding and appreciation of the varieties of social organization and their effect on the human condition by:

  1. Fostering intellectual curiosity.
  2. Breaking free from the leash of cultural conformity by learning to think critically and creatively about issues for themselves without relying on others (authorities) to make the assessments for them.
  3. Finding, understanding and critically assessing scholarly and analytic bodies of socio-anthropological literature.
  4. Developing the skills and knowledge to conduct basic socio-anthropological investigations.
  5. Developing a foundation of socio-anthropological theory about the way humans interact with the social and physical world such that they can use them to understand and assess a variety of human actions around the world.
  6. Practicing the skill of connecting social observations with theory so that theories can be used by graduates throughout their lives to develop sophisticated assessments about the causes and effects of human actions.
  7. Writing and speaking clearly and fluently while also incorporating the socio-anthropological knowledge (i.e. terms, concepts and theories) that they have gained in their socio-anthropological coursework.
  8. Achieving breadth of knowledge across socio-anthropological substantive areas and depth within one area.

Employment of recent sociology alumni

  • Case manager, Goodwill Industries of Central Pennsylvania
  • Caseworker, Berks County Children and Youth Services
  • Client services specialist, Schuylkill Community Action
  • Clinical case manager, Horizon Behavioral Services
  • Coordinator, child life therapy, Walter Reed Army Medical Center
  • Coordinator, support services, Peninsula Volunteers Rosener House
  • Counselor, Children’s Home of Reading
  • Director, marketing, Stone Ridge Village Retirement Community
  • Director, shelter services/housing, Opportunity House
  • Director, social service, Brandywine Hospital
  • Early intervention therapist, Montgomery County
  • Eligibility specialist, Delaware County
  • Intelligence analyst, Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • Intensive case manager, Children’s Crisis Treatment Center
  • Legal advocate, Women’s Resources of Monroe County
  • Licensed mental health counselor, Department of Elder Affairs
  • Medical social worker, Visiting Nurse Association of Somerset Hills
  • Mental health intensive care manager, Path, Inc.
  • Primary case manager, AIDS Community Alliance
  • Program director, Berks Community Action Program
  • Program supervisor, United Cerebral Palsy Central Pennsylvania
  • Public services assistant, Hennepin County
  • Recruitment manager, Bucks Association for Retarded Citizens
  • Regional director, Joint Action in Community Service
  • Residential program specialist, Penn-Mar Organization
  • Social worker, Bethanne Foster Care
  • Social worker, Caring Hospice Services
  • Supports coordinator/case manager, Montgomery County
  • Therapist, Youth Services of Bucks County
  • U.S. Marshalls
  • Supreme Court Detail, United States Secret Service
  • Intelligence Office for International Terror Risk, Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • Forensic Crime Lab, Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • Forensic Investigations, State Crime Lab

Graduate Programs

  • Georgetown University
  • University of Pennsylvania
  • University of Connecticut
  • West Virginia University
  • Louisiana State University
  • Kansas State University
  • Saint Joseph’s University
  • Indiana University of Pennsylvania
  • University of Cincinnati
  • Drew University
  • University of Delaware
  • University of Essex, United Kingdom
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • West Chester University
  • Saint John’s University
  • University of Maryland, College Park
  • North Carolina State
  • Howard University

 

Perhaps the most comprehensive of the social sciences, sociology is concerned with the analysis and explanation of social phenomena. These phenomena, which range from the socialization of the child to criminal behavior and cultural change, are studied and investigated using a wide variety of research techniques. Through formalized standards of inquiry, sociologists focus on the relationships between the parts of social systems and how the systems are formulated, how they function, and how they are related to the everyday lives of human beings.

The Sociology and Anthropology Department offers four tracks:

The department also supports the following interdisciplinary majors:

In addition, students can combine each of the four tracks mentioned above with another academic discipline to form a combined major. The department also offers minors in Criminology and Sociology.

Core Courses

This diversity of majors covers a wide range of topics, but they are unified by a set of core requirements for all students in the department (with the exception of the environmental studies interdisciplinary major). These core courses include:

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (or ANT 101 for anthropology majors)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics
  • SOC 213 Social Theory (anthropology students have other course options to satisfy this requirement)
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar

(Some substitutions are allowed in the above for students co-majoring in another social science with similar required courses and those with interdisciplinary majors. These are noted below).

Appropriate academic skills are also ensured at each level in that all 300-level courses (excluding 400-level Anthropology) require a sophomore standing or above as a pre-requisite, and all 400-level sociology (excluding 400-level Anthropology) courses require a junior standing or above. Courses at the 400 level also have as a prerequisite that all other core courses be completed in addition to at least one additional 300-level course. Many other prerequisites exist for individual courses to ensure that students can build on a specific set of foundational skills in their upper-level courses.


Anthropology Major

The anthropology major expands the focus of investigation to include biological, cultural and ecological forces that have effects on humans. From human evolution to cultural diversity to ecological constraints, students learn to incorporate a broad array of information and perspectives to arrive at a more complete and complex understanding of the human species. Four core courses provide a comprehensive foundation about the essential constraints that act on mankind. Additionally, two electives must be completed to enhance the students’ understanding in particular areas (conflict, sex, evolution). Finally, students complete their anthropological courses with an independent study in which they design and conduct a semester-long research project that requires them to gather and assess data in one particular area of human activity.

Due to the broad and multidisciplinary nature of anthropology, students completing this major will be prepared to undertake graduate studies in a variety of disciplines including anthropology, sociology, law, medicine and a number of other social, environmental and biological sciences. Likewise, they will be prepared to enter careers in a variety of areas, such as international relations, international business, education, medicine, public policy, law, labor organization, government, environmental resource management, economics and development, social work and counseling.

Requirements

  • ANT 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science requirement)
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning Requirement)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods or ESS 298 Ecological and Anthropological Field Study in Peru
  • One of the following:
    • PSY 205 Biological Psychology
    • SOC 213 Social Theory
    • PSY 319 Evolutionary Psychology
  • ANT 285 The Human Animal
  • ANT 310 Crime, Culture and Conflict Resolution
  • ANT 320 Sex, Gender and Culture (ANT 303 Food and Culture can be substituted for either ANT 310 or ANT 320)
  • ANT 342 Human Evolution
  • ANT 382/482 Internship (or an approved course)
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar (students in the anthropology major may substitute an independent study with permission from the department)
  • One of the following:
    • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 231 Cults
    • SOC 251 Crime and Deviance
    • SOC 261 The Family
    • SOC 262 Social Stratification
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
  • One of the following:
    • ANT 265 Ecological Psychology
    • ANT 270 People of the World
    • ANT 303 Food and Culture
  • Two of the following:
    • ANT 270 People of the World (if not used above)
    • ANT 265 Ecological Psychology (if not used above)
    • ANT 280 Martinique Studies
    • ANT 303 Food and Culture (if not used above)
    • ESS 298 Ecological and Anthropological Field Study in Peru (if not used above)
    • LAS 160 Caribbean Culture
    • LAS 225 Introduction to Latin American Studies
    • LAS 275 Service Learning in the Dominican Republic
    • LAS 285 Ritual in Latin America
    • LAS 352 Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World
    • REL 250 Judaism: Religion and Culture
    • REL 251 Islam: Ideals and Realities
    • REL 257 Buddhism Across Cultures
    • REL 266 Asian Cultural Life
    • REL 267 African and African-American Religious Traditions
    • REL 268 The Sacred Paths of Native Americans
    • SOC 331 Sociology of Mass Media and Popular Culture
    • SOC 395 Comparative Cultures: Ecuador

Combined Anthropology Major

Requirements

  • ANT 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science requirement)
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning Requirement)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods or ESS 298 Ecological and Anthropological Field Study in Peru
  • One of the following:
    • PSY 205 Biological Psychology
    • SOC 213 Social Theory
    • PSY 319 Evolutionary Psycholog
  • ANT 342 Human Evolution
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar (students in the anthropology major may substitute an independent study with permission from the department)
  • Two of the following:
    • ANT 285 The Human Animal
    • ANT 310 Crime, Culture and Conflict Resolution
    • ANT 320 Sex, Gender and Culture
  • One of the following:
    • ANT 265 Ecological Psychology
    • ANT 270 People of the World
    • ANT 280 Martinique Studies
    • ANT 303 Food and Culture

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Criminology Major

The criminology major exposes students to the sociological perspective through study of the methodology of the field, basic theoretical paradigms, as well as the study of socialization, culture, deviance and conformity, social organization and societal development, complex organizations, and the principles of stratification and other forms of social inequality. In addition, students study the social problem of crime and deviance within the context of other social problems, e.g., family dysfunction, poverty, education, racism, gender issues, and the sociology of work and occupations. Courses that concentrate on crime and delinquency are concerned with:

· The study of behaviors defined as criminally deviant in both American society and other developed and developing societies

· The traditional and contemporary theoretical explanations of both the process of defining criminal behavior and the social and interpersonal decisions and circumstances related to engaging in criminalized deviant behavior

Students study the methodology of social research used in the study of these forms of deviance including secondary data analysis and empirical research construction and design. A course in parametric and nonparametric statistics provides students with additional analytic tools for use in collecting and studying aggregate- as well as individual-level data on crime and delinquency.

Students are able to use internship opportunities to experience and participate in the activities of an organization or agency whose activities relate to the application of the program content. Internship opportunities can be either in a local organization or agency or in association with an off-campus experience such as the Washington Center or the Philadelphia Center. The senior seminar provides students a capstone course integrating the various components of the program and incorporating the opportunity to complete a major empirical study of some facet of crime and delinquency of interest to them.

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • SOC 251 Crime & Deviance
  • SOC 202 The Criminal Justice System
  • SOC 382/482 Internship, travel abroad course, or a 400-level approved substitution
  • Two of the following:
    • ANT 101 Intro to Cultural Anthropology
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 230 Cultural Sociology
    • SOC 231 Cults & New Religious Movements
    • SOC 261 The Family
    • SOC 262 Social Stratification
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
    • ANT 285 The Human Animal
  • Four of the following:
    • SOC 253 Criminal Investigation and SOC 254 Advanced Criminal Investigation (must take both courses to satisfy one of the requirements from this list)
    • SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 305 Terrorism
    • SOC 307 Organized Crime
    • SOC 309 Crim. Corrections
    • ANT 310 Crime, Culture, Conflict Resolution
    • SOC 311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC 360 Crime and the Media
    • SOC 385 Violence & Victims
  • One of the following:
    • SOC 440 Ethnographies in Crime and Deviance
    • SOC 450 White-Collar Crime
    • SOC 460 Serial Murder

Study Abroad courses are also encouraged as electives.


Combined Criminology Major

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • SOC 251 Crime & Deviance
  • One of the following intermediate specialized courses:
    • SOC 253 Criminal Investigation and SOC 254 Advanced Criminal Investigation (must take both courses to satisfy one of the requirements from this list)
    • SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 305 Terrorism
    • SOC 307 Organized Crime
    • SOC 309 Crim. Corrections
    • ANT 310 Crime, Culture, Conflict Resolution
    • SOC 311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC 360 Crime and the Media
    • SOC 385 Violence & Victims
  • One of the following advanced application courses:
    • SOC 440 Ethnographies in Crime and Deviance
    • SOC 450 White-Collar Crime
    • SOC 460 Serial Murder

Because this is a combined major there are relatively few topically based requirements.  Therefore it is strongly encouraged that criminology combined majors use their electives to take additional topical courses


Criminology Minor

The criminology minor exposes students to the sociological perspective through study of the methodology of the field, basic theoretical paradigms, as well as the study of socialization, culture, deviance and conformity, social organization and societal development, complex organizations, and the principles of stratification and other forms of social inequality. In addition, students study the social problem of crime and deviance within the context of other social problems such as family dysfunction, poverty, education, racism, gender issues, and the sociology of work and occupations.

Requirements:

  • SOC101 Introduction to Sociology
  • SOC251 Crime and Deviance
  • Three of the following courses:
    • SOC202 The Criminal Justice System
    • SOC210 Research Methods
    • SOC211 Social Statistics
    • SOC213 Social Theory
    • SOC253 Criminal Investigation
    • SOC254 Advanced Criminal Investigation
    • SOC302 Juvenile Deliquency
    • SOC307 Organized Crime
    • SOC309 Criminal Corrections
    • SOC311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC360 Crime and the Media
    • SOC385 Violence and Victims
    • ANT310 Crime Culture, Conflict Resolution

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Family Studies Major

The family studies major provides students with an extensive academic understanding of family systems and their relationship to the development and social participation of their members as well as the skills to evaluate and conduct research on topics related to family interaction. The course requirements for students in this program focus on understanding the family as a social group and the dynamics of family participation in American society as well as in a global context. Students are introduced to the theory of group formation, the external forces that impinge upon family functioning and the methods that can be used to measure and anticipate family dysfunctions. Students who combine family studies with another major may enter the employment market immediately upon graduation in fields such as preschool education, elementary education, and residential treatment and care, or may pursue a graduate degree in family studies.

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Quantitative Reasoning course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • SOC 203 Human Services for Families and Children
  • SOC 261 The Family
  • SOC 270 Parenting & Technology
  • SOC 271 Work and Family Conflict
  • SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
  • SOC 311 Domestic Violence
  • ANT 320 Sex, Gender, & Culture
  • SOC 382/482 Internship, travel abroad course, or a 400-level approved substitution
  • Two of the following:
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 230 Cultural Sociology
    • SOC 251 Crime & Deviance
    • SOC 262 Social Stratification
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
    • ANT 101 Introduction to Anthropology
    • ANT 285 The Human Animal
  • One of the following:
    • SOC 470 Immigration & Transnational Families

Combined Family Studies Major

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Quantitative Reasoning course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • SOC 261 The Family
  • One of the following intermediate courses:
    • SOC 203 Human Services for Families and Children
    • SOC 270 Parenting & Technology
    • SOC 271 Work and Family Conflict
    • SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC ANT 320 Sex, Gender, & Cultur
  • One of the following advanced application courses:
    • SOC 470 Immigration & Transnational Families

Students are also encouraged to complete an internship as an elective.

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General Sociology Major

The sociology major is designed for students who are interested in a general, though intensive, study of sociological methodology, theory and content areas. Students with a major in sociology can find employment in business and government, in human service organizations and international organizations, as politicians, educators, journalists and social researchers, and in foreign service. The general sociology major is intended primarily for students who plan to attend law school or pursue graduate study in sociology. It is also intended for those who seek careers in business, governmental or community service occupations for which graduate school training is unnecessary.

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning Course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • SOC 382/482 Internship, travel abroad course, or a 400-level approved substitution
  • Two of the following:
    • ANT 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 202 The Criminal Justice System
    • SOC 230 Cultural Sociology
    • SOC 261 The Family
    • SOC 262 Social Stratification
    • ANT 285 The Human Animal
  • One of the following:
    • ANT 310 Crime, Culture and Conflict Resolution
    • ANT 320 Sex, Gender and Culture
  • Two of the following:
    • SOC 203 Human Service for Families & Children
    • SOC 231 Cults & New Religious Movements
    • SOC 251 Crime and Deviance
    • SOC 270 Parenting & Technology or SOC 271 Work and Family Conflict
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
  • Three of the following:
    • SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 305 Terrorism
    • SOC 307 Organized Crime
    • SOC 311 Domestic Violence
    • SOC 331 Mass Media & Popular Culture
    • SOC 332 Sport & Leisure
    • SOC 333 Sociology of Religion
    • SOC 334 Religion & Popular Culture
    • SOC 360 Crime and the Media
    • SOC 385 Violence and Victims
  • One of the following:
    • SOC 410 Sociology of Education
    • SOC 415 Childhood and Adolescence
    • SOC 430 Collective Behavior & Social Movements
    • SOC 440 Ethnographies in Crime and Deviance
    • SOC 450 White Collar Crime
    • SOC 460 Serial Murder

Combined General Sociology Major

Requirements

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science course)
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning course)
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • One of the following:
    • ANT 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
    • SOC 201 Social Problems
    • SOC 202 The Criminal Justice System
    • SOC 230 Cultural Sociology
    • SOC 251 Crime & Deviance
    • SOC 261 The Family
    • SOC 262 Social Stratification
    • ANT 285 Human Animal
    • SOC 291 Environmental Sociology
  • One additional 300-level sociology course
  • One additional 400-level sociology course

Sociology Minor

Sociology is the scientific study of people and groups. This focus can be as narrow as looking at short interactions between people in passing or as complex as analyzing global social processes. Perhaps the most comprehensive of the social sciences, sociology is concerned with the analysis and explanation of the most challenging issues of our time: street crime and delinquency, corporate downsizing and dislocation, child abuse and dysfunctional families, welfare and education reform, racism and ethnic cleansing, and problems of peace and war. The sociology minor provides significant study of the discipline through a selection of 5 courses.

Students are required to complete SOC101 “Introduction to Sociology” and four additional courses with a SOC- or ANT- prefix.


 

Sociology Courses

SOC 101
Introduction to Sociology
A general study, emphasizing the concepts and methodologies through which the sociologist investigates the nature of the social structure and the social processes related to individual behavior. General Studies Foundations-Social Science

SOC 201
Social Problems
An introduction to the sociology of social problems. This course concentrates on the sociological analysis of significant problems as they relate to the social institutions in contemporary American society and their global counterparts. It provides an introduction to the sociological research and literature concerning major social problems such as health care, public education, poverty, racism, sexism, etc. General Studies Foundations-Social Science

SOC 202
The Criminal Justice System
This class allows students to examine a broad array of topics related to the criminal justice system in America. A number of guest speakers who are working in various positions in the system will be invited to describe and discuss their work and areas of expertise. Students are encouraged to think critically about public safety questions and focus on issues, complexities and policies of the criminal justice system, while demonstrating the inter-relationships of the system’s components. Students will also be expected to complete a research paper on one area of interest. Sophomores and freshmen only.

SOC 203
Human Services for Families and Children
The development and evolution of legislation, programs and services for families and children are analyzed. This course focuses on the social problems of poverty, drug addiction, domestic violence, sexual abuse and limited health services as experienced by children through their family structures and organization. Students are exposed to the range of private and public human services through examining program goals and the operation of these parts of the human services network.
Prerequisite: SOC 101

SOC 210
Research Methods
An exploration of the application of the basic tenets of scientific research to social science topics. Topics investigated include the formalization of research topics, the isolation and operationalization of theoretical concepts, the construction of hypotheses, sampling theory and alternative means for selection, study design selection and evaluation, data collection techniques, the organization of empirical data for hypothesis testing.

SOC 211
Statistics
An introduction to the theory and practice of basic statistical analysis. Topics considered include the organization and tabulation of raw and grouped data, graphical presentation of univariate and multivariate distributions, central tendency and variability measures, elementary probability theory with binomial applications, the theory of sampling and the central limit theorem, one and two sample tests of hypotheses concerning means and proportions, the analysis of variance and regression. Satisfies general studies quantitative reasoning requirement.

SOC 213
Development of Social Theory
An exploration of the evolution of social thought leading to the systematic and scientific basis of modern sociology.

SOC 230
Cultural Sociology
What is culture and how and why should we study it from a sociological perspective? How do we conceive culture in relation to other concepts such as power, identity, social structure and society? These are a few of the questions that will be addressed in this course as we explore several traditions of cultural theory and examine current debates in sociology over how to analyze culture.
Prerequisite: SOC 101

SOC 231
Cults and New Religious Movements
This course provides an opportunity for students to develop a general sociological understanding and perspective with which to evaluate, interpret, and understand new religious movements, also known as “cults.” Topics investigated include the historical emergence of new religious movements, recruitment strategies, and the use of violence. Several case studies are used throughout the course, including the People’s Temple, the Branch Davidians, Aum Shinrikyo, Montana Freemen, Solar Temple, Heaven’s Gate and Chen Tao. General Studies Connections.

SOC 242
Societal Approaches to Death & Dying
This course will address the variability in the experience of dying, death, and coping with loss based on multiple factors. Dying and death were once embraced as a tender time, to be supported and spoken of openly among family members, extended friends and support systems. The dying were cared for at home and after death, and were similarly viewed in celebration of their life’s value and importance, promoting one’s legacy.
In today’s modern society, dying, death, grief, and bereavement have become taboo subjects despite the advent of hospice and other cultural changes (such as Death with Dignity legislations, the diverse impact of Dr. Jack Kevorkian, utilization of Advanced Directives, the rising suicide rate, etc.) that would be thought to proactively promote such discussions. This course provides opportunities to address these many contemporary issues while placing additional focus on societal processes attendant to dying and death. Additional topics will cover the demography of death, care systems for the dying, the concept and treatment of pain, and what constitutes a “good death.” General Studies Connections-Humanities.

SOC 251
Crime and Deviance
An introduction to the sociology of deviance as it relates to criminal behavior. An analysis of crime and delinquency, as well as the cultural implications of conformity and deviance in society, are the major topics of the course. Sociocultural definitions of deviance and conformity are investigated as they relate to their causes, prevalence and sanctioning.

SOC 253
Criminal Investigation
This course is designed to provide students with the basic theoretical and philosophical understanding of the investigatory process. The course covers the fundamentals of criminal investigation and teaches the skills and knowledge necessary to conduct thorough preliminary investigations of crime. Crime scene search and recording, collection and preservation of physical evidence and scientific aids are studied. Analysis of problems encountered in interviewing, interrogating, evidence collection, and admissibility are examined. Sources of information, follow-up and case presentation are addressed. Application of investigative theories to the administration of justice is also examined.
Prerequisite: SOC 101, SOC 251

SOC 254
Advanced Criminal Investigation
This course is designed to provide students with a detailed understanding of the scientific methods and instrumentation used in processing crime scenes and physical evidence collected during a criminal investigation. Topics include fingerprints, cast and mold development, blood and other body fluids, hair, fibers, tool marks, paint, glass and plastic fragments, ballistics and specialized instrumentation. Practical exercises will supplement lecture to provide students with a better understanding of the techniques discussed in class.
Prerequisite: SOC 101, SOC 253

SOC 261
The Family
For better or for worse, we are all part of a family!  Families are universally important social institutions both historically and contemporarily.  However, the majority of families around the world have certain things in common: relating people biologically and socially, organizing reproduction, care, and residence.  However, the specifics of how these things are accomplished may vary substantially based on context.  This course focuses on families in the United States, but will also make connections to global families as well.  It will introduce you to how sociologists study families and the related topics that can be very “private,” personal, emotional, and important to many of us.  How can we examine topics like love, sex, marriage, and parenthood in a scientific and rigorous way?  We will also discuss the ways in which families are made incredibly “public” through policy discussions and constraints. A central theme will be diversity and change as we consider the many ways families have changed over the past century. The course begins with the defining of the family followed by historical origins, changes, and contemporary issues.  We then move on to talk about marriage and social class and racial issues in families.  We will also examine non-marital relationships including cohabitation, divorce, and remarriage. Lastly we will investigate parenting roles, child socialization, and the social construction of motherhood and fatherhood.  We will end the course with a case study examining why some women break traditional norms and put motherhood before marriage.  General Studies Foundations-Social Science

SOC 262
Social Stratification and Structured Inequality
This course provides an opportunity for students to develop a general sociological understanding and perspective with which to evaluate, interpret and understand social stratification in America. Topics investigated include racial, ethnic, gender and cultural stratification as well as inequality in the American educational, criminal justice, economic and political systems.

SOC 265
Global Families
This course examines global family diversity from a sociological perspective with an emphasis on the ways that social, economic and political conditions affect family roles, values, norms and problems. The result is a better understanding of U.S. family experiences within this global context.
Prerequisite: SOC 101

SOC 270
Parenting & Technology
Technology is changing all around us!  Have you watched a two-year-old work your smart phone?  And what is this thing called “sexting”? Our lives have been taken over by digital devices, social media, and in some cases, a whole new language (ROTFLMAO!).  But what does that mean for one of society’s oldest institutions, the family?  First, we will assess the way technology has changed the way in which we meet people, date, and form our own families.  Next, we will examine the way in which technology has changed the way we raise our kids, starting from infancy to young adulthood.  Finally, we will study the conflict often involved with our technology tether to the workplace and the impact it has on our lives and the lives of our family members.

SOC 271
Work and Family Conflict
This course examines the competing responsibilities of two significant sociological institutions: Labor Markets and Families.  Responsibilities associated with Labor Markets are typically associated with paid work as opposed to responsibilities associated with Families are generally unpaid and require a component of care or nurturing.  It also examines how there is also significant overlap when it comes to these boundaries.  This course begins by looking at the history of WFC through things like the division of household labor and the time (and money) squeeze felt by families.  It also examines the way in which single-earner and dual-earner families experience this squeeze differently.  In the second half of the semester, the course focuses on the way in which mothers and fathers experience WFC differently as well as the health implications families face in coping with WFC.  Finally, we will examine the role of employers and policy solutions to help families juggle WFC.

SOC 291
Environmental Sociology
This course will focus on the interconnections between social systems and ecosystems. Cultural, economic, social and environmental paradigms will be examined as to their effect on a wide range of ecosystem scales. By using a sociological focus to examine complex environmental issues, students will gain a deeper understanding of how these issues can be resolved in a fair and equitable way. Specific topics covered will include consumption, global warming, environmental movements, international and domestic development, food and agriculture, etc. All topics covered in the course will maintain a specific focus on their effects on the environment and the role that social systems play within them.  General Studies Connections

SOC 302
Juvenile Delinquency
Patterns of juvenile delinquency are examined within the framework of the social definition of the adolescent years in American society and the response of the criminal justice system to behavior which society has deemed deviant. Within this framework the course focuses on the conflicting expectations and opportunities available to youth in American society; the operation of the juvenile justice system including the formal and informal processing of those whose age-specific behavior is defined as “delinquent”; the patterns and trends in delinquent behavior; the major theoretical perspectives used to account for and explain juvenile delinquency; and the range of options society has to control, punish, reward or treat those who exhibit delinquent behavior.
Prerequisite: SOC 101, sophomore standing or above

SOC 305
Terrorism
This course examines the concept of terrorism through a comprehensive overview of the many disciplines the subject crosses. Various positions on issues of controversy, fear and prevention are examined. Illustrations of cultural, historical, tactical factors, and social causes of some of the major forms of terrorism are addressed. An integrated approach to the subject includes domestic and international issues as well as the importance of security techniques and intelligence gathering. Case studies of terrorist groups and their activities are presented.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above

SOC 307
Organized Crime
This course examines criminal activities carried out through criminal organizations and focuses on organized crime as it related to cultural history, assimilation processes and the characteristics of American society, which have fostered its growth and success. Trends in organized crime in terms of ethnicity, structure and activities are investigated. Law enforcement strategies and tactics used to control organized crime are also examined. (Cross-listed as LAS 307).
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above

SOC 309
Criminal Corrections
This course focuses on the alternatives available to provide sanctions to those convicted of criminal deviance. Taught by a sitting criminal court judge, the course looks at criminal sanctions in terms of the Constitution, efficacy and judicial discretion. Particular attention is paid to the purpose of criminal corrections within the context of individual rights and society’s desire for punishment, protection and rehabilitation.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above

SOC 311
Domestic Violence
The definition, characteristics and nature of domestic violence are explored, with particular emphasis on the various forms of violence that take place within the familial context such as abuse of spouses, children and the elderly. The perspectives of both the victims and those who batter them are addressed through case studies. Prevention strategies, treatment techniques and the role of law enforcement are also explored.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above

SOC 331
Sociology of Mass Media and Popular Culture
This course provides an opportunity for students to develop a general sociological understanding and perspective with which to evaluate, interpret and understand popular culture. Topics investigated include how and when the academic study of popular culture began; what theories have been instrumental in the field; the sociological analysis of the meaning of popular culture; the organization of popular cultural production; and the relationship between popular culture and social change. The lectures, readings and discussions use examples from several of the popular arts including music, movies, publishing and advertising.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above

SOC 332
Sociology of Sport & Leisure
This course provides an analysis of the social aspects of sport, with emphasis on the interrelationship of sport and society. The course focuses on topics such as social values, education, sport roles, religion, socialization, mass media, sexism and racism, and is oriented to students with an interest in sports.
Prerequisite: SOC101, sophomore standing or above

SOC 333
Sociology of Religion
This course provides an opportunity for students to develop a general sociological understanding and perspective with which to evaluate, interpret and understand religion and religious institutions. Topics investigated include the role of belief, values and symbols; religious recruitment; how religious organizations are formed and maintained; the link between religion and social inequality; how religion has changed and adapted in American culture; and various contemporary expressions of religion in the U.S. including cults, civil religion, fundamentalism and the commercialization of religion.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above

SOC 334
Religion & Popular Culture
How do popular culture and the mass media affect religion? Conversely, how does religion affect our popular culture and mass media? What are we to think of Christian forms of commercial entertainment like “religious rock music,” “Christian hip-hop” and “Christian romance novels” or motion pictures? Several critics have pointed out that the industry that produces these things is nothing more than an attempt to make money off of religion. Others, however, feel that this industry provides an important role in maintaining and reinforcing religion by giving people what they want: religious commercial entertainment. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the role religion plays in creating and maintaining culture through popular cultural expressions such as music, television, motion pictures, sports and fashion. Students analyze how popular culture affects religion and how religion, in turn, affects popular culture and society.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above

SOC360
Crime and the Media
From CSI to Law & Order to Chucky and the evening news, Americans are saturated with images of crime and deviance. This course explores the causes and consequences of our fascination with this genre. With foundations in both sociology and communication studies, this course addresses such questions as: Why are people fascinated with images of crime? Does exposure to such media affect propensity to commit crime, and, if so, what kind of depictions are the most influential? Can influences result from material that isn’t even explicitly crime-related (e.g. cartoons or sexualized material)? Since most people experience “virtual crime” daily but rarely if ever experience serious crime first hand, how might the media shape or distort our perception of crime and how might this in turn shape our civil society? Finally, how do media effects shape the criminal justice system itself? In addition to traditional study, this discussion-based course will ask students to view and analyze samples of contemporary crime based media. Students should come prepared to be exposed to some graphic violent or sexually themed material for the purposes of academic study. Multiple forms of media will be addressed including print, dramas, cartoons, movies, news and web-based communications.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above

SOC 382
Internship
An off-campus placement in a human services, community, criminal justice, health-care or business setting for students in the Sociology and Anthropology Department. Students are under supervision of both a faculty member and an employee of the sponsoring organization. Students must complete at least 150 hours of study during one semester of the academic year and complete a project related to the sponsoring organization.
Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of the department

SOC 385
Violence and Victims
This course focuses on the socio-cultural basis for violence in American society and for others throughout the world. Using a global perspective, this course addresses a variety of types of violence, its causes and its consequences. Topics addressed include street violence, gang warfare, hate crimes, serial murder and gender specific crimes. The theoretical basis of the causes of violence is also examined. The consequences of violence for both individual victims and society as a whole are explored.
Prerequisite: SOC 101, sophomore standing or above

SOC 410
Sociology of Education
This course explores education from a sociological perspective by looking at the structures, practices, content and outcomes of schooling in relation to the broader society in which schools are situated. This perspective allows students to challenge common assumptions about schools and to understand why they are organized the way they are, how they sort people into their adult roles, and how current reforms are changing the structure of education in our society.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or above, SOC 261, all other core courses below the 400 level (SOC 101, SOC 210, SOC 211, SOC 213), and one additional 300 level SOC or ANT course.

SOC 415
Childhood and Adolescence
This course is an opportunity to examine the experiences of children and adolescents from a sociological perspective. Because these experiences typically occur within the confines of the family, this course considers the sometimes competing influences of family, peers, schools and media on the lives of young people. Topics discussed include childhood socialization, stratification, peer status systems, cultural consumption and sexuality.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or above, SOC261, all other core courses below the 400 level (SOC 101, SOC 210, SOC 211, SOC 213), and one additional 300 level SOC or ANT course.

SOC 430
Collective Behavior and Social Movements
This course provides an opportunity for students to develop a general sociological understanding and perspective with which to evaluate, interpret and understand social movements and collective behavior. Topics investigated include behavior in crowds, moral panics, fads, riots and organized movements intended to create major social changes.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or above, all other core courses below the 400 level (SOC 101, SOC 210, SOC 211, SOC 213), and one additional 300 level SOC or ANT course.

SOC 440
Ethnographies in Crime and Deviance
Ethnography is a type of research by which an investigator, overtly or covertly, participates in the lives of his or her research subjects over an extended period of time. This participation is accompanied by the use of a trained scholar’s skills to observe what happens, listen to what is said, and, occasionally, pose questions or conduct interviews. Quality ethnography makes a reader feel as if he/she personally knows the people and places described. Students in this course are asked to complete their own small ethnographic projects, but the bulk of this seminar-style course is devoted to the study of significant works in ethnographies of criminal or deviant populations. Hence, students will read and discuss studies in which researchers live with, interview and otherwise share their lives with such individuals as drug dealers, muggers, crack addicts, rapists, prison guards, and their respective families and acquaintances. Through intimate exposure to the personal thoughts and lives of deviants and law enforcement personnel, an understanding is gained that goes beyond the abstractions of theory or remoteness of statistical analyses.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or above, SOC 251, all other core courses below the 400 level (SOC 101, SOC 210, SOC 211, SOC 213), and one additional 300 level SOC or ANT course.

SOC 450
White Collar Crime/Elite Deviance
Elite deviance constitutes a major social problem for American society, and much of the world as well. This course introduces students to the concept of elite deviance and the variety of cultural, political and social situations that foment it. The course focuses on the global nature of elite deviance and examines its corporate, political and occupational dimensions. Both policy and regulatory issues in government and business are also examined relative to major theoretical positions.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or above, SOC 251, all other core courses below the 400 level (SOC 101, SOC 210, SOC 211, SOC 213), and one additional 300 level SOC or ANT course.

SOC 460
Serial Murder/Criminal Profiling
This course is designed to be a scholarly, comprehensive, empirical examination of the phenomenon known as serial murder. Content will include, but is not limited to, psychological, sociological, biological and familial influences, and individual case studies. Serial murder will be distinguished from other forms of multiple homicides. The many problems associated with addressing serial murder will be considered. Other topics that will be covered include serial murder and its relation to race and gender, the many myths associated with serial murder, and the role of the media and law enforcement officials. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the difficulties in apprehension of serial killers. A major course component is an applied exercise where students in small groups create, investigate and apply profiling techniques relating to this phenomenon.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or above, SOC 251, all other core courses below the 400 level (SOC 101, SOC 210, SOC 211, SOC 213), and one additional 300 level SOC or ANT course.

SOC 470
Immigration and Transnational Families
Both the study of immigration and the questions that study raises are at the very root of social science.  These studies also suggest that immigration is rapidly changing the structure of the family unit through the creation of transnational families. In this seminar, we will survey the literature that gives evidence of the major concepts and questions in immigration studies as well as a variety of case studies that will bring to life the lived experiences of migrant workers, their families, and in particular, their children.This course will insist that immigration is central to US history because of its permanent historical and social imprint on the country as well as the current and future demographic impacts that we are witnessing on both a national and global scale. We will begin with a basic foundation of “what is immigration” and a history of immigration policy in the US.  Next, we will examine the impact of immigration on families and the resulting transnational families and global care chains inadvertently created.  When it comes to the impact of migration on children, we will examine the impact on children when they are left behind, when they try to immigrate alone, and when they are born in the US to an undocumented parent(s). Prerequisite: Junior standing or above, all other core courses below the 400 level (SOC 101, SOC 210, SOC 211, SOC 213), and one additional 300 level SOC or ANT course.

SOC 482
Internship
An off-campus placement in a human services, community, criminal justice, health-care or business setting for students in the Sociology and Anthropology Department. Students are under supervision of both a faculty member and an employee of the sponsoring organization. Students must complete at least 150 hours of study during one semester of the academic year and complete a project related to the sponsoring organization.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department

SOC 490
Senior Seminar in Sociology
An advanced research seminar that focuses on conducting a hypothesis-testing empirical research project on a topic of interest to the student. Building on the content of SOC 210 Research Methods, this course concentrates on the collection and analysis of social science data and culminates in the writing of the senior thesis.
Prerequisite: Senior standing, all other core courses (SOC 101, SOC 210, SOC 211, SOC 213), and at one additional 300 level SOC or ANT course.


Anthropology Courses

ANT 101
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Anthropology is an inherently interdisciplinary exploration of the study of humanity in all its glory and problems. This course examines humans holistically. It covers diverse topics ranging from human evolution to religion. Cross-cultural comparisons of a variety of human behaviors provide insights to the question of what it means to be human. Satisfies general studies social science requirement.

ANT 206
Food and Culture
The focus of this course is on what humans eat and why. We explore both the biological and cultural reasons for human food choice. As omnivores we evolved into a species that not only is capable of but also needs to eat a wide variety of foods. Culturally, we have developed certain desires for particular foods over others and have identified ourselves based on the foods we eat; this has even produced differences in food choices based on social status. Finally, new food production and processing capabilities of the modern industrial world have thrown open the floodgates and have allowed us to both overeat and overspecialize in certain food types. This course examines the extremely complex interplay of all these forces on the foods we eat and the resulting health and ecological effects. (Cross-listed as IDS 206) NOTE: Changed to ANT 303 effective with the 2015 Fall Semester

ANT 265
Ecological Psychology
The objectives of this course are to understand the psychological origin and scope of current environmental problems and how they relate to our values, attitudes and behaviors; to study human experiences and behavior in their environmental, political and spiritual context; to question the human institutions and values that lead to environmental problems; and to explore the role of humans within the larger ecosystem. (Cross-listed as IDS 265 and PSY 265)

ANT 270
People of the World
This course examines the way people live from around the world. This is accomplished through ethnographies and films. All forces that may have combined to produce a particular way of life are incorporated in the analysis. These include ecology, history, politics, economics, etc. The groups selected for analysis are predominantly of non-Western origins. Students should emerge with a broader and more sophisticated understanding of humans and their cultural diversity and universality. (Cross-listed as LAS 270)

ANT 280
Martinique Studies
This interim course introduces students to the people and lands of the French-speaking Caribbean island of Martinique through an intensive and structured visit to the island. After reading and assessing a series of preparatory articles in early January, the class will fly to Martinique, where they will be guided by accompanying faculty to a series of activities that will enlighten them to many aspects of Martinique life. These undertakings include lectures at the university, field trips to various parts of the island and a variety of directed events, which will encourage students to participate in many facets of Martinique culture. (Cross-listed as EVS 280, IDS 280 and LAS 280)

ANT 285
The Human Animal
What are humans and how did we get to be the way we are? How do we live? What makes us act the way we do? Are we moral? How do we affect other species and the world around us? These are the questions we shall investigate in this course, and to answer them we will take an interdisciplinary approach drawing on the disciplines from both the natural (biology, ecology) and social (anthropology, sociology) sciences to provide insights into the heart and soul of the human species. After examining the process of natural selection we will explore how it forged modern Homo sapiens over the last 5 million years. We will then look at the finished product in terms of our mental and physical characteristics. We will complete this investigation by examining how we (humans) tend to interact with other species and our surrounding environment. It is hoped that many of the complexities and confusion about who we are will become more clear as we develop an understanding of both our capabilities as well as our limitations. Overall, students should gain a more complete comprehension of who they are as a member of the human species. (Cross-listed as IDS 285)

ANT 303
Food and Culture
This course explores why we eat what we eat. What affects you in your eating decisions? We will examine all the factors that go into these most significant decisions for all humans. We will find that there is a complex group of influences starting with our biological adaptations for hunger and appetite, extending through ecology, and culminating with cultural influences. This process will require you to draw from your past courses, which have exposed you to a variety of perspectives about reality. You will need to synthesize these different ideas and apply them to the specific questions about food use. You will find that this more comprehensive perspective used in combination with critical thinking will enable you to understand the complexities to the answer of why we eat the foods we eat and why cultures differ. (Cross-listed as SYN 303)

ANT 310
Crime, Culture and Conflict Resolution
This course introduces students to the “law ways” of different societies, in particular non-industrialized societies. The goal is to explore the extent to which different societies employ coercion, punishment and consensus in order to maintain order and resolve conflicts. Topics include rules and crime, the cultural basis of right and wrong, informal and ritualized disputing, conflict theory and conflict resolution (avoidance, community action, ritual reconciliation, negotiation and mediation), oaths, ordeals, and punishment, adjudication and codified law, feuding, raiding and warfare (internal and external).

ANT 320
Sex, Gender and Culture
This course introduces students to the diversity of roles that men and women occupy in a wide variety of societies. The course covers topics such as the biological basis of sex differences, primate studies as windows into human sexuality and social life, feminist perspectives on evolution, gender complementarity, the cultural construction of gender differences, religious ideas about women as both polluting and powerful, notions of masculinity (vis-à-vis femininity), and the impact and spread of capitalism on the position of men and woman.

ANT 342
Human Evolution
How humans came to be what they are today is one of the most intriguing and interesting topics that can be examined. We can gain powerful and enlightening insights into the mystery of the human animal: How did we come to be? What is our evolutionary legacy? Why do we act the way we do? What might we expect in the future? This course explores human origins starting with the evolution of primates. It focuses on hominids commencing with their split from chimpanzees and traces their transitions to modern Homo sapiens. Students examine how we got to be the way we are both physically and mentally, and they will examine both the variety and similarity in humans around the world, population genetics and evolved psychology.

ANT 482
Internship
An off-campus placement in a human services, community, criminal justice, health-care or business setting for students in the Sociology and Anthropology Department. Students are under supervision of both a faculty member and an employee of the sponsoring organization. Students must complete at least 150 hours of study during one semester of the academic year and complete a project related to the sponsoring organization.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department

ANT 490
Senior Seminar in Anthropology
An advanced research seminar that serves as the synthesis and culmination of prior coursework in the Anthropology major.  This course concentrates on the collection and analysis of social science data and culminates in the writing of the senior thesis. Prerequisite: Senior standing

Urban Affairs Courses

URB 490
Senior Seminar in Urban Affairs
An advanced research seminar that serves as the synthesis and culmination of prior coursework in the Urban Affairs major.  Coursework includes reflection on how learning in the major can be applied in a student’s career and the creation of a senior thesis addressing a specific urban problem. Prerequisite: Senior standing

soc-anthro

Barton Thompson, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Sociology

610-921-7593
bthompson@albright.edu

soc-anthro

Carla Abodalo, MS

Senior Instructor of Sociology

610-921-7592
cabodalo@albright.edu

soc-anthro

Charles Brown, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Sociology; Department Chair

610-921-7865
cbrown@albright.edu

soc-anthro

Kennon Rice, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Sociology

610-921-7881
krice@albright.edu

soc-anthro

Brian Jennings, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Sociology

610-921-7892
bjennings@albright.edu

soc-anthro

Elizabeth Kiester, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Sociology

610-921-7885
ekiester@albright.edu

soc-anthro

Teri Jensen-Sellers, M.A.

Adjunct Lecturer in Sociology

610-929-6729
tjensen-sellers@albright.edu

soc-anthro

Adrienne Lodge, M.S., C.F.E., C.A.M.S.

Adjunct Lecturer in Sociology-Criminal Justice

610-929-6768
alodge@albright.edu

Contact the department chair:
sociologychair@albright.edu


Advising Sheets


Research Resources

Institutional Review Board

The IRB is an Albright College committee that oversees all research involving human subjects.

Gingrich Library

Other Libraries

Databases these libraries may have

Criminal Justice Abstracts

Provides comprehensive coverage of the major journals in criminology and related disciplines.  Criminal Justice Abstracts also provides extensive coverage of books and unparalleled access to reports from government and nongovernmental agencies. For each document there are informative summaries of the findings, methodology and conclusions.  Topics include: crime trends, prevention projects, corrections, juvenile delinquency, police, courts, offenders, victims, sentencing, etc.

Criminology Penology and Police Science Abstracts

An index of articles with abstracts from 1992-1997 covering the causes of crime and juvenile delinquency, the control and treatment of offenders, criminal procedure, the administration of justice, and police science.  Subject divisions are criminology and other disciplines, offenses: deviant behavior, victims, juvenile justice and delinquency, criminal law, crime policy, police, courts, and corrections, followed by both an author and a subject index.

Social Sciences Citation Index

Indexes articles and citations from over 1,700 international social science journals.  Fields covered include anthropology, archaeology, area studies, business, communication, criminology, demography, economics, education, environment, ergonomics, ethnic studies, family studies, geography, geriatrics and gerontology, health policy, history, industrial relations, information science and library science, international relations, law, language and linguistics, management, nursing, philosophy, planning and development, political science, psychiatry, psychology, public administration, public health, rehabilitation, social issues, social work, sociology, substance abuse, transportation, urban studies, and women’s studies.  Also includes: bibliographies, fiction and prose, book reviews, items about individuals, corrections, and additions, poetry, discussions, review papers, editorials, reviews of computer hardware and software, letters, meeting abstracts, and notes.

Anthropological Literature

Indexes articles and essays in anthropology and archaeology published in English or other European languages.  Produced by Tozzer Library, Harvard University.

Websites

Online Newspapers

• The Boston Globe • The Chicago Sun-Times
• The Los Angeles Times • The New York Post
• The Philadelphia Inquirer • The St. Louis Post-Dispatch
• USA Today • The Washington Post

Useful Technology

Information Technology Services (ITS)

Qualitative Data Analysis software

Quantitative Data Analysis software

Digital Audio Transcription software

Bibliographic software

Bookstores

If you cannot borrow a book, you always have the option of purchasing it through a bookstore. Some good places to purchase books follows.


Facilities & Equipment

The Sociology and Anthropology department has a number of resources that set it apart from others.  This starts with the physical setting of the department.  Across the hall from the faculty offices is a casual lounge with a television, comfortable chairs, and a kitchenette.  Students can meet with their professors for lunch in the space, complete their academic work, while literally having their professors at arms-reach for help, or just relax and watch TV.  The department also has a computer lab in this same hallway.  The lab has free printing and is available to students during most of each day and some evening hours, so that again, students can work on projects in immediate proximity to their professors.

When the lab is not open to general use, it is because it is the site where we teach students statistical analysis using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), considered to be the standard for social science research throughout the world.  Students also have the opportunity to learn qualitative analytic software such as Nvivo or Deduce, and Geographic Information System (GIS) software for mapping and spatial analysis of social phenomenon.  To aid with research, students have access to an extensive collection of data sets on cities, counties and states as well as on all known primitive cultures and contemporary societies.  Some of these data sets are the same sets used by professionals across the country and others are exclusive to Albright, collected by current faculty and their past students.

Finally, our latest addition is a crime lab where students can analyze evidence from a mock crime scene using the same tools and techniques that any professional in law enforcement would use.


Thinking About Grad School?

The decision to go to graduate school is an important one. You will, undoubtedly, have many questions before you make that final decision to go through the application process. Whether you are just beginning your inquiry or are working on your statement of purpose, the resources below will help guide you along the way.

An articulation agreement between Albright College and the University of Delaware offers Albright graduates streamlined admission to select master’s programs in Delaware’s School of Public Policy and Administration. Under the terms of the agreement, qualifying Albright undergraduates receive conditional acceptance prior to completion of their baccalaureate degree.

Sociology Professors
As your number one resource to understanding graduate school, speaking with a faculty member in Sociology should be one of your first steps. The faculty in the department would be happy to talk to you about what graduate school is like, how to select a school that’s best for you and how to apply.  Just email, telephone or stop by to let us know you’re interested.  We strongly encourage you to visit one of us if you are curious about graduate school.

Career Services
The Experiential Learning and Career Development Center, located at 1817 Linden St. in the Geiser House, has a great deal of information on graduate school. They also have information on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) which is a requirement for many graduate programs. To get the most out of this resource, please call to schedule a visit in person.

Guide to Graduate Programs in Sociology
Published yearly by the American Sociological Association, this guide lists over 250 sociology graduate programs in the United States and other countries.  The Guide lists each schools’ contact information, the names of faculty (along with their areas of expertise), special programs, the amount of financial assistance available, and the names and dissertation titles of recent Ph.D. graduates.  A copy is available in the student lounge on the second floor of Selwyn Hall.

Ph.D. Graduate School Rankings in Sociology
A list of the top 106 Ph.D. graduate programs in sociology can be downloaded in Microsoft Excel by clicking here.  A print copy is also located on the AKD bulletin board next to Dr. Brown’s office (located in Selwyn 203).  The rankings are based on U.S. News and World Report and are, therefore, somewhat subjective.  The rankings should only be used as a rough guideline for choosing a school.  Please click here to view the listing directly on the website. Viewing the website will allow you to evaluate the quality of both the school and the ranking system.

Websites of Sociology Graduate Programs
The most comprehensive website for sociology graduate programs is Sociolog.  It lists hundreds of sociology programs across the nation.  Some navigation is required to find the type of program you need, so keep in mind that not all departments listed on Sociolog have graduate programs.

Taking the GRE
Most sociology graduate programs require applicants to take the Graduate Record Exam (GRE).  The GRE is administered by the same company that does the SAT.  In fact, the GRE is very similar to the SAT.  It has four sections: verbal, quantitative, logic, and a written component.  You may click here to be taken to the official GRE Website.  You can also Download GRE POWERPREP.  GRE POWERPREP Software includes two computer-based GRE General Tests, sample analytical writing topics, scored sample essays and reader commentary, test-taking strategies, a math review, and test tutorials.  This software is sent to individuals who register for the computer-based GRE General Test or you may download it now.


Timeline to Prepare for Graduate School

Note:  Soc 101 (Intro to sociology), 211 (Statistics), 213 (Social Theory) & 210 (Research Methods) should be completed before the beginning of your senior year but you would be better off completing all four before the beginning of your junior year as these are the four foundational courses for our discipline!!!  Below is a suggested time line to get everything finished on time and prepare for graduate school:

During the Freshman or Sophomore Year

  • Take Soc 101 (Introduction to Sociology)
  • Take Soc 211 (Statistics)

During the Sophomore Year

For a membership form, you may visit the websites above. Forms may also be found in Selwyn Hall.

  • Get to know at least two faculty members in the department by stopping by his/her office once or twice a semester (Note: these visits only need to be about 15 minutes long… just tell the professor that you’re interested in getting to know him or her a little more because you’re thinking that you may want to use him/her as a reference in the future).

During the Sophmore or Junior Year

  • Take Soc 210 (Research Methods)
  • Take Soc 213 (Social Theory)

During the Fall Semester of Junior Year

  • Join Alpha Kappa Delta if eligible
  • Talk to a faculty member about doing an Independent Study for credit (in place of an internship) that can also qualify for an ACRE project and a Departmental Honors Thesis (NOTE: You don’t have to begin the study until later… you just need to talk to a faculty member about doing something in the future to figure out a topic and research project).

 During the Interim of Junior Year

  • Think about doing a ½ or a Full ACRE project with a faculty member and make between $500 and $1,000 for your effort.

During the Spring of Junior Year

  • Finalize what you will be doing for your Independent Study/ACRE project/Departmental Honors Thesis
  • Begin studying to take the GRE

During the Summer Before Senior Year

  • Complete an Independent Study with a faculty member (Soc 481) which can also be an: ACRE project which can then be turned into a: Departmental HonorsThesis  (NOTE: Summer 1/2 ACRE Grants are $1,250; Full ACRE Grants are for $2,500)
  • Continue studying to take the GRE

During the Fall of Senior Year

  • Sign up for Soc 481: Independent Study (even though the work has already been completed you sign up for the class Fall rather than Summer so that you don’t have to pay tuition during the summer)
  • Take the GRE between August and October
  • Complete graduate school applications and have them turned in by January 1st (After the Fall semester is over).

During the Spring of Senior Year

  • Present your completed Independent Study/ACRE project/Departmental Honors Thesis at a professional conference
    (NOTE: You should obtain additional funding from the PC when you apply for your ACRE grant that should completely pay for you to do this).

Internships

Internships are designed to provide informed students the opportunity to participate meaningfully in an off-campus setting related to their academic interests. While you may complete tasks that benefit the agency with which you’re placed, the primary goal of the internship experience is for you to develop an understanding of how the agency is organized, how it fits into the larger social institution of which it is a part, and how the “work” of the agency is related to the overall operation of the social system.

The internships are meant to benefit both you and your placement site. You will benefit through your interaction with, and questioning of, the professionals and staff at the agency. The sites where you and your fellow students intern benefit from your talents and energy. It’s your responsibility to take advantage of the opportunity provided to you.

The internship experiences we provide students are the result of cooperation between the College and internship site, but you are responsible for identifying and setting up your own internship. This means that you should make the initial contact with the site and set up a schedule for your internship activities. You must clear your choice of internship with a member of the sociology faculty before making initial contact.

Requirements

You are expected to work onsite for a minimum of 145 hours and write a major paper analyzing your placement and experience there. Guidelines for the paper can be downloaded by clicking here or at the link below under “Forms.”

Although there are no formal tests or examinations associated with internship experience, the paper and the internship evaluation will be the basis for your grade. Internship experiences are intended to provide you with the opportunity to participate in the workplace environment. The same norms for punctuality, dress and behavior that apply to employees of the internship site are assumed to also apply to interns. Failure to comply with the agency’s norms or the College’s requirements will result in dismissal from the internship site and course failure.

Forms


Study Away

Field Studies

The Albright College sociology and anthropology department hosts a variety of opportunities for field study.  The sociology department takes advantage of the potential for hands-on learning within the City of Reading, and the city, in a way, becomes a socio-anthropological laboratory.  Students have worked with faculty to assess local social service agencies, study changes in neighborhoods experiencing reinvestment, explore the impact of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) on communities, measure gang involvement and risk factors for gang membership, interview community members on town-gown relations, and compare religious services, among others.

Some of the field studies in which students have engaged took place in:

  • Barber shops
  • Pet stores
  • Roller rinks
  • Childcare facilities
  • Nightclubs
  • Homeless shelters
  • Agricultural animal auctions
  • Abortion clinics

Some of these have been completed as independent studies with faculty members. Other independent studies have examined:

  • How international students are perceived by American-born students and vice versa
  • The degree to which humans favor friends or family
  • The dynamics of allegiance to members of athletic versus social groups
  • An ethnographic study of present day Ainu hunter-gatherers of Japan
  • Gender roles through an online survey that gives respondents immediate feedback on how they compare to others and seeks to identify patterns across demographics groups

The Albright Creative Research Experience (ACRE) program allows students to conduct an in-depth research or creative project while working closely with a faculty member. The College-wide program has approved and funded sociology projects including:

  • A study of students whose primary friendship group is of a different race than themselves
  • A study of alcohol consumption patterns by undergraduate students
  • A study of the degree to which humans extend ethics to non-humans
  • A study of why humans develop unwarranted certainty about their political opinions
  • An attempt to model crime “hot spots” in the City of Reading and identify variables that would allow predictions of the location of future crimes

Traveling farther afield, courses and our interest groups have the ability to make day trips not just to Harrisburg and Philadelphia, but also New York City and Washington, D.C.  So, the state capital, the nation’s capital and two of the nation’s largest cities are available to help you grow to your full potential.

If you are looking for even more adventure, study abroad programs include courses taught by faculty in the department that regularly travel to Peru and Ecuador (every other year, if not every year).  You might also take advantage of study abroad courses taught by other Albright faculty, taken as part of our general studies curriculum.  Or, perhaps, the most intense opportunity in experiential learning is spending a semester, or even a year, abroad in one of the college’s numerous partnerships with colleges/universities across the globe.

Our degrees are all about the “real world,” so why not experience it?  There is no reason to spend your college years trapped in the library or computer lab!

For more information about the sociology department, contact us at sociologychair@albright.edu. For more information on our study abroad programs, please contact the Experiential Learning and Career Development Center.