Music

As an important facet of a liberal arts education, the Albright College Music Department is dedicated to provide all students with diverse opportunities to explore their musical creativity and advance their music-related knowledge and abilities.  Academic courses, private instruction, as well as professionally directed instrumental and vocal performing ensembles are available to every student. It is our belief that consistent and conscientious participation in these activities will help students foster a lifelong commitment to critical thinking, problem solving, communication skills, time management, leadership, and teamwork.

Integral to our committed study of music at Albright College are our award-winning academic programs — a full major in Music Industry Studies and our co-major in the business aspects on the Music Industry. Both of these programs are designed to prepare students for success within the various professional arenas of the commercial music industry and flexible enough to fit our students’ specific needs.


Why Music at Albright?

It’s your artistic world at Albright.  Whether you’re a performing artist, a budding music industry mogul, or just a music lover, we offer you the opportunity to expand your skills, your appreciations, and your professional horizons in any way that makes perfect sense for you. Go ahead! Jump from the classroom to the concert hall; run from rehearsal to the recording studio; dash from a private lesson to a board meeting — this is what it’s all about when it comes to engaging in the exciting world of music at Albright. Beyond this, we’ll encourage you to examine your discoveries and collaborations through the broader lens of a global context that comes from a Liberal Arts approach to learning.   What are you waiting for?

The Department of Music is charged to serve students who have come to Albright to major in Music as well as those who desire to augment their Liberal Arts experience within the varying academic and artistic aspects of the field of music and the music industry.  With that in mind, we offer the following departmental learning goals from which we anchor our endeavors.

ARTISTRY: Acquire and develop the theoretical, aural, technical, and performative skills necessary toward the mastery of chosen areas of applied music study (piano, voice, guitar, etc.).

HISTORY: Acquire an appreciation for the representative artists, movements, genres, and styles associated with various periods of Western Music alongside a broader context of the unique role that music has played within diverse societies and cultures throughout recorded history.

THEORY: Acquire and develop the use of theoretical terms and practices associated with the compositional language of music within the arenas of both Western and Commercial Music.

INDUSTRY: Sharpen the critical thinking, research, and writing skills required to become an effective communicator and contributor within the contemporary commercial music industry.

BUSINESS: Acquire and develop a broad knowledge and understanding of the industry-standard business practices at work within the contemporary commercial music industry.

TECHNOLOGY: Apply a working knowledge of the terms and processes specific to the use of music technology within the contemporary commercial music industry.


We are both proud and thrilled that our Music Industry Studies programs has had such a lasting personal and professional impact on our students in such a relatively short time.  Our belief in a Liberal Arts approach to the study of the Business of Music can’t be better resonated than in the continued success of our students.

“The Music Department at Albright College was one of the most comprehensive aspects of my college life and prepared me extremely well for my career in the business of entertainment. From vocal lessons, concert choir, record label, production classes and internships, these opportunities granted me the ability to not only land a dream job working with artists and businesses right out of college, but I now run my own brand management company. Albright College, a great start.”

Andre Forbes-Ezeugwu (Music Business/Theatre ’10)

“When you hear the words Music Business, you quickly think of a fast-paced, exciting and entertaining lifestyle.  When I hear the words Music Business, I think of my Albright family.  They made this the most amazing experience for me through their hand-on approach to learning and welcoming family atmosphere.  I wouldn’t trade this experience for the world.”

Alice C. Santana (Music Business/International Business ’10)

“The best part of the Albright Music Business program is the small class size and the record label (at my time was a label, now an entertainment division) that allows you to get the knowledge and hands-on experience you need for the basic level of understanding in this business. Lion Records allowed me to put the knowledge I picked up in the classroom and the experience I gained at my internship into use.  The program provides you with a background and the record label entrusts you to implement what you have learned in real life situations.  Without this, I would not have had the confidence stepping into the business on my own.”

Dan Emmons (Music Business/Business Administration ’13)

“At Albright, I pursued a dual concentration in music business and business administration (marketing). One month before graduation, I was unsure where my career path would take me.  At the recommendation of my music business professor, I decided to continue my education by pursuing my MBA in music management at William Paterson University during which time I completed internships with the Madison Square Garden Company (in the entertainment bookings/marketing department) and at Line Nation (in the events marketing department). Now that I am about to graduate – with a grade point average of 3.9, I might add – I can absolutely say that my Albright education prepared me for grad school better than I ever could have imagined.”

Kari Keller (Music Business/Business Administration ’13)

Majors and Minors in Music

The world of commercial music has undergone a seismic shift in identity and purpose as young, entrepreneurial artists have taken control of both the content and delivery of their artistic material to the mass market — thanks to advances in digital technology and user-friendly online distribution systems. This is not a trend but the new face of doing music business in a digital world, assuming one has the harnessed skill sets and problem solving abilities necessary to thrive in both the worlds of artistry and industry. To prepare students for this exciting and multi-faceted profession, Albright’s Department of Music offers three academic degree programs. 

Note that a formal audition is not required for admission into the Music Department.


The Music Industry Studies Major

In the Fall of 2014, the Department of Music introduced our bachelor of arts degree in Music Industry Studies — an interdisciplinary major that integrates three academic areas of focus:  Artistry, Industry, and Technology.

The first focus, Artistry, includes courses in music history, theory, harmony, songwriting, commercial arranging, and private instruction (voice, piano, guitar, etc.). The second focus, Industry, harnesses our department’s existing Music Business curriculum to examine topics as diverse as: artist management; music distribution; licensing; copywriting; marketing and promotion; and, music law. The degree program culminates with two capstone experiences: an academic seminar in entrepreneurship and a pre-professional internship. Our Technology strand includes contact time within the arenas of audio technology (live sound), recording technology, and music production.

Requirements for the Music Industry Studies Major:

Artistry

– MUS 109 Applied Lessons (four semesters required)
– MUS 211 Theory and Aural Skills I
– MUS 212 Theory and Aural Skills II
– MUS 360 Songwriting
– MUS 361 Commercial Arranging

Industry

– MUS 243 The Business of Music: An Introduction
– MUS 244 Music Marketing and Promotion
– MUS 341 Concert Promotion
– MUS 342 Demo to Distribution (Elective credit only for MIS students)
– MUS 344 Artist Management
– MUS 345 Music Law

Technology

– MUS 250 Live Audio Production
– MUS 251 Recording Technology
– MUS 351 Music Production

Capstone Experiences

– MUS 491 Internship
– MUS 495 Senior Seminar

General Education (First Year Seminar – Recommended)

– FYS 100 History of the Recording Industry

General Education (Foundations/Fine Arts – Choose 1 of the Following 3 Courses)

– MUS 113 Popular Music in American Culture
– MUS 125 All That Jazz
– MUS 126 Music and the Cinema


The Music Industry Co-Major

As one of our country’s “Top 25 Schools for Artistic Students” (Newsweek, 2011), it goes without saying that for Albrightians, music is art.  But, since Albright also houses one of the country’s leading programs in Music Industry (Billboard, 2013), at Albright — music is also commerce.  Our interdisciplinary and experiential approach to learning is the perfect environment for aspiring artists and budding entrepreneurs to collaborate and envision the creative path of professional music in the near and distant future. The seven courses that comprise our Music Industry co-major — which you can combine with any other department’s co-major (Accounting, Spanish, or Arts Administration, for example) is designed to prepare you for an exciting career inside the business of the music industry.  As you can see, there is lot of flexibility within the combined major to offer you the ability to create the program that best suits your abilities and career goals.

Requirements for the Music Industry Co-Major

Four (4) Required Courses:

– MUS 243 The Business of Music: An Introduction
– MUS 244 Music Marketing and Promotion
– MUS 250 Live Audio Production
– MUS 491 Internship

Two (2) 300-level courses in Music Industry from the following:

– MUS 341 Concert Promotion
– MUS 342 Demo to Distribution
– MUS 344 Artist Management
–  MUS 345 Music Law

One (1) course in Applied Music/Music Appreciation from the following:

– MUS 103 Symphonic Band (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 104 String Chamber Orchestra (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 105 Concert Choir (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 109 Applied Music Lessons (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 113 Rags, Rock and Rap: Popular Music and American Culture
– MUS 120 Music Appreciation: Introduction to Western Music
– MUS 125 All That Jazz
– MUS 126 Music and the Cinema
– MUS 135 Introduction to Music Theory
– MUS 211 Theory and Aural Skills I

One (1) course to satisfy General Studies: Foundations: Fine Arts recommended from the following:

– MUS 113 Rags, Rock and Rap: Popular Music and American Culture
– MUS 120 Music Appreciation: Introduction to Western Music


The Music Industry Minor

One of the finest aspects to Albright’s interdisciplinary approach to learning is that our students are actively encouraged to expand their intellectual horizons by combining disparate areas of concentration to tailor-make an undergraduate experience as academically unique and satisfying as they can imagine. For those students who wish to augment their academic experience with an added focus in Music Industry, we offer a five-course minor.

Two (2) Required Courses:

– MUS 243 The Business of Music: An Introduction
– MUS 244 Music Marketing and Promotion

Two (2) courses at the 200 or 300 level from the following:

– MUS 211 Theory and Aural Skills I
– MUS 212 Theory and Aural Skills II
– MUS 342 From Demo to Distribution
– MUS 344 Artist Management
– MUS 345 Music Law

One (1) additional Music Department course at any level

Recommended: one (1) course from the following to satisfy General Studies: Foundations: Fine Arts

– MUS 113 Popular Music in American Culture
– MUS 125 All That Jazz
– MUS 126 Music and the Cinema


The Music Minor

For those students who wish to augment their academic experience with an added focus in the rudiments of Applied Music, we offer a five-course minor.

Two (2) Required Courses

– MUS 120 Music Appreciation: Introduction to Western Music
– MUS 211 Theory and Aural Skills I

Two (2) courses from the following (chosen with consultation of Department Chair):

– MUS 113 Rags, Rock and Rap: Popular Music and American Culture
– MUS 212 Theory and Aural Skills II
– MUS 250 Live Audio Production
– MUS 251 Recording Technology
– MUS 360 Songwriting

Four (4) Semesters of Study in Applied Music

– MUS 103 Symphonic Band (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 104 String Chamber Orchestra (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 105 Concert Choir (requires four semesters of study for credit)
– MUS 109 Applied Music Lessons (requires four semesters of study for credit)


MUS 103A: Symphonic Band

The Symphonic Band rehearses at least twice weekly and performs at least one concert per semester. The band experience includes classic and contemporary band literature and often features guest artists. Numerous ensembles are formed from among band members, providing additional instruction and performance opportunities. Students wishing to participate in Symphonic Band as a non-credited course must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

MUS 103B: Chamber Winds

The Chamber Winds, for the advanced instrumentalist, rehearses twice weekly and performs two concerts per semester. Participation is by audition. Music performed is advanced traditional and classic wind ensemble literature, often featuring guest artists. Membership is determined by audition. Students wishing to participate in Chamber Winds as a non-credited course must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

MUS 103C: Jazz Ensemble

The “Big Cat” Jazz Ensemble rehearses twice weekly and performs at least one concert per semester. This group focuses on jazz style, performing music representative of many eras of jazz history, with emphasis on swing and improvisation. The band performs contemporary arrangements as well as classic tunes from the jazz repertoire, giving attention to proper performance techniques. Participation is by audition. Music performed is advanced traditional and classic wind ensemble literature, often featuring guest artists. Membership is determined by audition. Students wishing to participate in Jazz Ensemble as a non-credited course must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

Students receive one course unit of credit upon completion of four semesters of MUS 103 with a grade of C or better. For non-majors, this fulfills the General Education: Foundations: Fine Arts requirement. An additional four semesters may be taken for elective credit.

MUS 104: String Chamber Orchestra

The String Chamber Orchestra consists of string players from the College and surrounding community. This group rehearses twice a week and performs at least once each semester. Music ranges from the Baroque era to popular contemporary. Smaller string ensembles are formed from the larger group, providing experience in chamber music performance. Students wishing to participate in String Chamber Orchestra as a non-credited course must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

Students receive one course unit of credit upon completion of four semesters of MUS 104 with a grade of C or better. For non-majors, this fulfills the General Education: Foundations: Fine Arts requirement. An additional four semesters may be taken for elective credit.

MUS 105A: Concert Choir

The Concert Choir rehearses twice weekly in preparation for various on-campus programs. The choir experience includes choral literature from chant through the present, giving all members opportunity for personal vocal development through a variety of choral traditions. Membership is determined by audition. Students wishing to participate in Concert Choir as a non-credited course must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

MUS 105B: Women’s Chorale

The Women’s Chorale rehearses twice weekly in preparation for various on-campus programs. The chorale experience includes literature from chant through the present written specifically for women’s voices, giving all members opportunity for personal vocal development through a variety of choral traditions. Membership is determined by audition. Students wishing to participate in Women’s Chorale as a non-credited course must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

Students receive one course unit of credit upon completion of four semesters of MUS 105 with a grade of C or better. For non-majors, this fulfills the General Education: Foundations: Fine Arts requirement. An additional four semesters may be taken for elective credit.

MUS 109: Applied Music Lessons

This repeatable course is equivalent to one-quarter unit for a one-half hour private lesson per week per semester. A student will receive one course unit of credit (elective only) after successfully completing (with a grade of C or better) four semesters of MUS 109. The grade for each semester is determined by a jury performance evaluation. This course cannot be used to satisfy the General Education: Foundations: Fine Arts requirement. Students are expected to spend three hours per week in outside preparation and to advance according to the level of their ability. Students registering for any section of MUS 109 are automatically placed with a teacher who will contact them to arrange a lesson time. Students wishing to take Applied Music Lessons without academic credit must fulfill credited lesson requirements. See the department chair for details. NOTE: An additional music lab fee accompanies this course.

MUS 113: Rags, Rock and Rap: Popular Music and American Culture

This course explores the genesis of popular music in English-speaking North America from the colonial period to the present, with emphasis on the period beginning in the 1890s just before the breakout of jazz, to the present-day multi-billion dollar industry of rock, pop, R&B, rap/hip-hop, country, dance/electronica and the emergent world styles that also form part of the evolving contemporary American musical scene. Lectures place equal emphasis on the musical styles themselves and their social context, including the role of composers, audiences, promoters, money, and music industry organizations. Lectures and discussion are enlivened by diverse music listening experiences. Satisfies General Studies: Foundations (Fine Arts) requirement.

MUS 120: Music Appreciation: Introduction to Western Music

This course offers an overview of Western classical musical styles, with an emphasis on the symphonic repertory and music by well-known composers such as Bach, Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms and Tchaikovsky. Other genres including opera, chamber music, the art song and church music are also explored. The course focuses on developing basic musical vocabulary and listening skills, skills that are also applicable to listening to and thinking about popular musical styles. The connections between music and social context are also discussed. Concert attendance and listening assignments are part of the course experience.
Satisfies General Studies: Foundations (Fine Arts) requirement.

MUS 122: Music in World Cultures: An Introduction

A grand tour of the musical styles of the world’s large culture regions: sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and the Islamic world, South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Pacific, East Asia, Amerindia, and the Western world. Students are introduced to basic musical concepts with emphasis on understanding musical instrument types and their characteristic sounds. Students listen to recordings of ancient and medieval folk music types of traditional rural communities (work songs, harvest songs, lullabies); the art music of the aristocratic courts (including the South Asian raga and the Western symphony); and the modern musical styles emerging in the contemporary urban and electronic age, from Chinese rock to African rap. Film viewings help students link the diverse musical sounds with social contexts. A visit from a world musician is planned each semester.

MUS 125: All That Jazz

This course covers jazz history from its obscure origins in the post-Civil War period to the present. The focus is on important instrumentalists and vocalists of the 20th century, and how they helped to create the different jazz and jazz-related styles, including: ragtime, blues, hot jazz, Dixieland, swing, bebop, cool jazz, free jazz and jazz fusion. Among the key performers and composers to be discussed are Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton, Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, Benny Goodman, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Dave Brubeck, Herbie Hancock and Keith Jarrett. Basic concepts of jazz performance and various jazz styles are explored through independent research, listening and discussion. When possible, field trips to live jazz performances are incorporated. Satisfies General Studies: Foundations (Fine Arts) requirement

MUS 126: Music and the Cinema

This is an introduction to the role of music in cinema, with emphasis on North American films between the 1930s and the present. Students learn how music aids in the creation of mood, atmosphere and characterization in films. Special topics include music in the silent film era, musicals, science fiction and horror films, the role of women as subjects and creators in modern cinema, music in the avant-garde and experimental cinema, popular music, rock and rap in film soundtracks, and music in selected non-Western film industries. Films to be discussed include classics such as Star WarsThe Godfather and Casablanca, as well as popular recent releases. Satisfies General Studies: Foundations (Fine Arts) requirement.

MUS 135: Introduction to Music Theory

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts and applications of music theory. Topics include pitch notation, scales, key signatures, intervals, chords and simple harmonization, and rhythmic notation. This course is designed for students with little or no musical background. Satisfies General Studies: Foundations (Fine Arts) requirement.

MUS 211: Theory and Aural Skills I

This course focuses on developing a foundation of basic knowledge in musical theory, tonal harmony, ear training, sight-singing and dictation. Students increase their ability to read, write and understand music according to prescribed guidelines of musical structure through skills obtained by examining and practicing the musical elements of intervals, scales, chord construction, diatonic part-writing, and melodic and rhythmic sight-singing and dictation. Prerequisite: MUS 135 (may be exempted by placement exam)

MUS 212: Theory and Aural Skills II

A continuation of MUS211, this course expands upon the musical elements previously studied and includes the use of chromatics, secondary dominants, seventh and ninth chords and analysis of harmonic structure.  Individual student projects are oriented towards analysis and introductory composition.  The course also includes further development of aural skills introduced in the previous semester. Prerequisite: MUS 211 (may be exempted by placement exam)

MUS 231: Music and Sound Design for Games and Video

This class will examine the creation and application of music and sound design as used in contemporary games, video, and other digital media. A focus will be placed on the relationship of audio to user experience and as a method of feedback in traditional and non-traditional gaming systems. The student will learn how to mix and synchronize soundtrack elements to video. Both the development process and consideration of final product will be explored. Prerequisite: ART 265

MUS 243 The Business of Music: An Introduction

This course will introduce students to the business aspects of the music industry, including marketing and promotion, copyright law, publishing, contracts, licensing, management, concert promotion and production. Today’s musicians must be equally versed as businesspeople to find or create careers in music. This course will provide a detailed introduction to diverse topics in the music business field. Students will learn skills and attain knowledge to help them succeed as a musician beyond performing.

MUS 244 Music Marketing and Promotion

This course introduces key music marketing principles, terms, and practices, which together form the foundation for all music-marketing plans. Students will develop an integrated approach to music marketing in the focus areas of licensing, press, retail, distribution (online and traditional), radio, advertising, merchandising, and touring. The information in this course can form the basis for a full marketing campaign, or be immediately implemented into an existing marketing and promotion plan. Prerequisite: MUS 243

MUS 250 Live Audio Production

This course offers students an introduction into the principles of audio technology with an emphasis on mixing for a live performance.  Topics include mixing techniques, microphone types, signal flow, equalization methods, and other types of signal processing.

MUS 251 Recording Technology

This course develops and masters many of the foundational skills introduced in MUS 250, but, rather than for the arena of live audio production, the student will learn to apply them in the recording studio as a mixing engineer. This course covers the history, tools, and techniques of music recording technology. Class lectures will be paired with hands-on use of professional technology as the student learns recording systems, signal flow, and advanced mixing techniques. The emphasis of this course is on creative musical projects using professional recording and mixing tools in a production environment. Prerequisite MUS 250

MUS 275: Healing Effects of Music: An Introduction to Music Therapy

This course examines the beneficial effects of music on the human mind and body. Students who have an interest in the relationship between music and health will explore the varied uses of music therapy, both within and without mainstream medical practices, educational institutions, correctional facilities, senior centers and private practice. This is accomplished through a combination of course materials, guest speakers, research, and field observations.

MUS 287: History of the American Musical

This course engages in a panoramic view of the American Century through the lens of one of its most inimitable creations — the Broadway Musical. From this vantage point we examine compelling connections between the historic and artistic development of this quintessentially American of all art forms with the socio-economic, cultural, political, and technological advances that fueled its’ inception, zenith, decline, and contemporary rebirth. Throughout our journey, students will develop a strong, interdisciplinary arts vocabulary of elements, theories, and practices that will enable us to hone a keen appreciation for the collaborative process involved of “putting together” a musical theatre work for the live commercial stage. With our skills finely tuned, we will then focus our learned attention toward a capstone project aimed at helping us predict Broadway’s future marketplace and cultural impact. Satisfies General Studies: Connections Requirement.

MUS 341 Concert Promotion

This course furthers students’ knowledge of the music business by developing an understanding of marketing, promotion and contract negotiation within the scope of concert production. Students will be responsible for planning, promoting, scheduling, and selling a fictional domestic tour of their choice. Through relevant projects, each student experience multiples careers surrounding the greater subject of concert promotion. Prerequisite: MUS 244

MUS 342 From Demo to Distribution

This course traces the steps of the music production process from the creation of a demo to national distribution. Students take part in simulating the day-to-day operations of a recording company, from selection of the artist through distribution of product. Students work with current artists to help create, manage, and market a professionally recorded demo or album. Throughout the development of each project, students will gain an understanding of releasing a musical product to physical and online retailers. Prerequisite: MUS 244

MUS 344 Artist Management

How does the manager help the artist succeed in the music business? Through contacts and an insight into the music industry; by being prepared, realistic, flexible and persistent; and by having a strategy for the artist to make his or her own opportunities. This course provides an overview of key artist management principles, terms, and practices. Students will be responsible for creating a mock management and financial plan to assess their ability organize short and long-term goals. Students will be assigned to a current artist and help manage different aspects of their career, including but not limited to touring, concert promotion, fiscal planning, and marketing.  Prerequisite: MUS 244

MUS 345 Music Law

This course provides an overview of laws relating to the entertainment industry. Specifically, students will be studying the history of Copyright Law and the development of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and the Stop Online Piracy Act. Students will also research relevant cases in the music industry to analyze recording/management contracts, review important court depositions, and investigate the foundations for the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and the Stop Online Privacy Act. In addition, the course suggests ways in which artists can protect themselves by arming themselves with knowledge and proper representation.  Prerequisite: MUS 244

MUS 351 Music Production

Music Production is designed to harness the skill sets introduced in MUS 251 Recording Technology toward the Production of Music in the digital domain. Beginning with the history and artistry of music composition within the digital domain, students will then learn how to compose diverse styles of music (hip-hop, electronica, pop and others) for a variety of purposes. The pedagogic emphasis of this course is on creative musical projects using professional mixing and electronic composition tools such as MIDI, synthesis, and sampling. Prerequisite: MUS 212 and MUS 251

MUS 360: Songwriting

This course introduces students to the craft of songwriting.  Students will study specifics of song structure and analyze different musical styles.  The course will also combine the study of lyrics, melody, harmony, and rhythm used to create songs.  Students will collaborate with their classmates creating joint works and will create individual works as well.  In addition, in-class songwriting workshops will give the students a chance to gain feedback on their pre-existing works from the instructor and classmates.  Music Business concepts in regard to copyrights, licensing and trade organizations and basic music theory terminology will also be discussed.  Prerequisite: MUS 212

MUS 361 Commercial Arranging

This course teaches and develops skills necessary to arrange vocal and instrumental ensembles for a variety of popular genres from a technical, theoretical, and historical perspective. Through the examination of popular songs for their use instrumentation and arrangement, students will learn to compose idiomatically for a variety of instruments and to effectively arrange these instruments together in an ensemble. Prerequisite: MUS 360

MUS 491: Internship

The music business seminar is a practical, off-campus work experience that requires students to participate in daily operations of a music business career. A minimum of 11 on-site hours per week is required.
 Prerequisite: MUS 244 and 250.

MUS 495 Senior Seminar

This course assists students in the creation of their own business. Students will attain historic knowledge of industry specific entrepreneurs and develop their own enterprise based upon their knowledge. Through industry relevant projects, students must research various businesses related to their area of interest, propose a prospective business, create a business plan, develop a corporate structure, market their enterprise, and seek out prospective employees. Prerequisite: Senior Standing MIS Major/Co-Major and completion at one (1) MUS 300 level course.

music

Adlai Binger, M.M.

Co-Chair and Director of Choral Music

610-921-7872
abinger@albright.edu

music

Tamara Black, M.M.

Adjunct Lecturer in Music (Voice/Theory/History)

610-921-7715
tblack@albright.edu

music

Jesse Clark, M.M.

Instructor of Music Technology

610-921-7871
jclark@albright.edu

music

Michael Eben, B.S.

Director of Jazz Ensemble and Adjunct Lecturer in Music

610-921-7715
meben@albright.edu

music

Timothy D. Gross, M.A.

Director of Symphonic Band

610-921-7715
tgross@albright.edu

music

Jeffrey, Lentz, M.M.

Co-Chair and Senior Artist in Residence (Theatre/Music)

610-921-7806
jlentz@albright.edu

music

Brian Levering, B.A.

Instructor of Guitar

484-336-6785
Brianlevering@gmail.com

music

A.J. Merlino, D.M.A.

Assistant Professor of Music/Director of Music Industry Studies

732-822-4665
AMerlino@albright.edu

music

Lars Potteiger, B. M.

Adjunct Instructor of Music

347.563.6449
LPotteiger@albright.edu

music

Dana Weiderhold, M.M.

Director, String Chamber Orchestra

610-921-7715
dweiderhold@albright.edu

Facilities, Equipment & Technology

In 1990, with a lead gift by philanthropist Doris Chanin Freedman and a major grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, Albright College launched a $6.5 million building project under the direction of architect Adele Santos, who collaborated with sculptor Mary Miss to create the central plaza and amphitheater that form the heart of our Center for the Arts (CFA).

Around this central artwork, Santos designed a south wing to house the Art Department, with studios for drawing, painting, printmaking, ceramics and woodworking. The north wing houses the Freedman Gallery, with a small outdoor sculpture court separating it from the northeast wing, which is home to the Music Department and its studios, practice rooms and Roop Hall performance space. The costume and fashion sewing lab connects this floor via a breezeway to the Campus Center. On the second floor of this wing sit the Recording Studio, Wachovia Theatre, box office and mezzanine, where special events and receptions are held. Klein Hall, which serves as a space for class lectures and is home to the International Film Series, directly connects the CFA to the Campus Center on this level.

Across campus from the Center for the Arts is our 900-seat Memorial Chapel that serves as the performing venue for our choral and instrumental programs.

Facilities and Equipment

  • Recording Studio | Located on the second floor of the Center for the Arts, this suite of three adjoining rooms…
  • Roop Hall | The multiuse classroom/recital space seats 150 and includes a small stage and Yamaha grand piano; home to 3-4 Concert Series events per year and used as practice space for 4 choral ensembles and 4 instrumental bands offering 8-12 student concerts per year.
  • Wachovia Theatre | A 270-seat proscenium theatre with adjacent workshop, control room, box office, green room/dressing rooms and costume/sewing lab; home to the Domino Players, Albright College Thespian Society and both the Less Than or Equal To and Soviet Purgatory Improv troupes, which produce 4-5 main stage productions and 12-20 student projects per year.  This space also serves as a recital hall for various guest artists and performing groups.
  • Memorial Chapel | Acoustically rich and visually stunning, this 900-seat space serves as the performing venue for the combined choirs, the band/chamber orchestra concerts, Albright Idol, and other cultural events throughout the year. The chapel is equipped with a Baldwin concert grand piano and the Maier Memorial Organ — donated by William E. Maier, HH.D., ’31, in memory of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Maier. This spectacular pipe organ, built and installed by the Shantz Organ Company of Orrville, Ohio, boasts 2,345 pipes, 54 stops, and is a 40-rank instrument with three manual and pedal divisions, or which the choir and swell divisions are under expression.
  • WXAC 91.3 FM | With studios and offices located in the basement of the Library/Administration Building, Albright College’s own radio station offers first-hand opportunities for students to learn about marketing, public relations and communications, as well as the delivery side of the music business industry.

Technology

Depending on the courses taken and experiential learning opportunities in which you partake, you may come into contact with and develop skills using the following databases, programs, and equipment:

  • ProTools (industry standard sound and video editing)
  • Reason (music production software)
  • Sibelius (music notation software)
  • SchoolDude (online space/venue scheduling software)
  • University Tickets (online ticketing system and subscriber database)
  • WebPort and Citrix (financial accounting and budget reconciliation software)

Performing Ensembles

Albright College’s Department of Music offers young singers and instrumentalists the opportunity to develop both their talents and appreciation for the art of music making through hand-on experiences in the classroom, the concert hall, and the recording studio. Our extraordinary array of student performing groups and ensembles is a perfect example of why Newsweek magazine ranked Albright College as one of the “Top 25 Most Artistic Schools” in 2011.  Both our credited and extracurricular ensembles (for which ALL Albright students are welcome and encouraged to audition) offer numerous performances each year for the college and neighboring communities.

Credited performing ensembles include:

  • Concert Choir
  • Women’s Chorale
  • Symphonic Band
  • String Chamber Orchestra
  • “Big Cat” Jazz Ensemble

Extracurricular performing ensembles include:

  • Albright Angels (women’s a cappella group)
  • Mane Men (men’s a cappella group)
  • Mane-gels (mixed voice a cappella group)
  • Instrumental Chamber Ensembles
  • Pep Band

Choral Ensembles
The art of choral singing has always enjoyed a very proud and robust tradition at Albright College. The Department of Music presently offers five choral ensembles for student participation.  Participation in all choral groups is determined by audition; however, any Albright student is welcome to audition. While academic credit is offered for participation in the Concert Choir and Women’s Chorale, the other ensembles listed below are extra-curricular. Students in either Concert Choir or Women’s Chorale will receive one course unit of credit upon completion of four semesters with a grade of C or better. For non-majors, this fulfills the General Education: Foundations (Fine Arts) requirement. An additional four semesters may be taken for elective credit.

Concert Choir
The Concert Choir is a group of approximately 40 singers (male and female) designed to provide the opportunity and education for young artists to be life long contributors to the art of choral performance.  This ensemble rehearses on Mondays and Wednesdays from 4:00 to 5:20 PM in preparation for various on and off-campus programs.  This choral ensemble experience includes learning and performing choral literature from chant through the present, giving all members opportunity for personal vocal development through a variety of choral traditions.  Membership is determined by a vocal and musical-skills assessment held at the beginning of each semester.

Women’s Chorale
The Women’s Chorale provides students with the opportunity and education necessary to be contributors to the art of choral performance.  This ensemble rehearses Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4:00 to 5:20 PM in preparation for various on-campus, and occasional off-campus, programs.  This choral ensemble experience includes learning and performing choral literature from chant through the present, giving all members opportunity for personal vocal development through a variety of choral traditions.  Membership is determined by a vocal and musical-skills assessment held at the beginning of each semester.

Albright Angels
Founded in 1998, the Albright Angels is a vocal ensemble of approximately 12 members that performs primarily a cappella selections from a variety of musical styles and genres that are written and/or arranged for treble voices. Auditions for this ensemble are held at the beginning of each semester. During the audition process, each singer is expected to prepare assigned repertoire and perform in quartets without accompaniment.  The prerequisite for participation in Albright Angels is participation in a credited choral performing ensemble (Concert Choir or Women’s Chorale). This ensemble meets Tuesdays from 7:30 – 9:00 PM & Thursdays from 6:00 – 7:30 PM for rehearsal. The Albright Angels perform at the four choral concerts held each academic year as well as at various on and off-campus events and performances — including a Spring Tour (held during Spring Break) with their brother organization, the Mane Men. This group makes 20+ appearances each year.

Mane Men
Founded in 2001, the Mane Men is a vocal ensemble of approximately 12 members that performs primarily a cappella selections from a variety of musical style and genres that are written and/or arranged for male voices.  Auditions for this ensemble are held at the beginning of each semester.  During the audition process, each singer is expected to prepare assigned repertoire and perform in quartets without accompaniment. The prerequisite for participation in Mane Men is participation in a credited choral performing ensemble (Concert Choir).  This ensemble meets Tuesdays from 6:00 – 7:30 PM & Thursdays from 7:30 – 9:00 PM for rehearsal. The Mane Men perform at the four choral concerts held each academic year as well as at various on and off-campus events and performances — including a Spring Tour (held during Spring Break) with their brother organization, the Albright Angels. This group makes 20+ appearances each year.

Mane-gels
The Mane-gels is the name that the Albright Angels and the Mane Men have given to themselves when they perform together.  This ensemble performs primarily a cappella music.  The prerequisite for participation in Mane-gels is participation in a credited choral performing ensemble (Concert Choir or Women’s Chorale) and successfully auditioning into Albright Angels or Mane Men.  This ensemble meets Mondays & Wednesdays from 5:20 — 6:00 PM for rehearsal.  The Mane-gels performs at the four choral concerts held each academic year as well as at various on and off-campus events and performances — including a Spring Tour (held during Spring Break).

Instrumental Ensembles
The art of instrumental music has always enjoyed a very proud and robust tradition at Albright College. The Department of Music presently offers four instrumental ensembles for student participation.  Participation in all instrumental groups is determined by audition; however, any Albright student is welcome to audition. Students will receive one course unit of credit upon completion of four semesters with a grade of C or better. For non-majors, this fulfills the General Education: Foundations (Fine Arts) requirement. An additional four semesters may be taken for elective credit.

Symphonic Band
The Symphonic Band rehearses at least twice weekly and performs at least one concert per semester. The band experience includes classic and contemporary band literature and often features guest artists. Numerous ensembles are formed from among band members, providing additional instruction and performance opportunities. Students wishing to participate in Symphonic Band without receiving course credit must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

Chamber Winds
The Chamber Winds, for the advanced instrumentalist, rehearses twice weekly and performs two concerts per semester. Participation is by audition. Music performed is advanced traditional and classic wind ensemble literature, often featuring guest artists. Membership is determined by audition. Students wishing to participate in Chamber Winds without receiving course credit must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

“Big Cat” Jazz Ensemble
The “Big Cat” Jazz Ensemble rehearses twice weekly and performs at least one concert per semester. This group focuses on jazz style, performing music representative of many eras of jazz history, with emphasis on swing and improvisation. The band performs contemporary arrangements as well as classic tunes from the jazz repertoire, giving attention to proper performance techniques. Participation is by audition. Music performed is advanced traditional and classic wind ensemble literature, often featuring guest artists. Membership is determined by audition. Students wishing to participate in the “Big Cat” Jazz Ensemble without receiving course credit must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

String Chamber Orchestra
The String Chamber Orchestra consists of string players from our college and surrounding community. The group rehearses weekly and performs one concert per semester exploring musical ranges from the Baroque era to Popular/Contemporary Music. Smaller string ensembles are formed from the larger group, providing experience in chamber music performance. For the 2016-17 season, The String Chamber Orchestra will be collaborating with the Sunday Sinfonia Orchestra (SSO), a local community organization open to all. The combined group will be called “Sunday Sinfonia at Albright College” for the duration of the collaboration. The orchestra is under the artistic leadership of Maestro Simon Maurer, Musical Director of SSO, and Dana Weiderhold of Albright College. Rehearsals are held in Roop Hall (CFA) on Sunday evenings from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. each week of the semester. For more information, check the Sunday Sinfonia at Albright College website — sundaysinfonia.org  Note: Students wishing to participate in the String Chamber Orchestra without receiving course credit must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

Instrumental Chamber Ensembles
The college supports a variety of instrumental ensembles that meet one a week and perform at various concerts throughout the year.  These ensembles include: Brass, String, Percussion, and Woodwinds.

Pep Band
The Pep Band is a student run organization that performs for home football and basketball games.  The group meets once a week during the football and basketball season.


Albright College Instrument Rental Policy

Instruments (non-keyboard) within the Albright College’s inventory are available for students active in the Music Industry Studies/Music Business degree program(s) with priority given to students enrolled in performance ensembles and/or lessons. The instruments are housed in the CFA building and are administered by the ensemble directors/private instructors of the Music Department. Students are responsible for maintaining their instruments for the term of their rental, and are held responsible for any damages or loss that might occur. Students must transport their own instruments to/from rehearsals and performances.

Rental Procedures

  • Instrument rental forms are available through the Music Department website.
  • Students must consult their ensemble director/private instructor then complete the form submission to acquire the appropriate instrument.
  • Once the form has been submitted and accepted, the student’s ensemble director/private instructor will issue the instrument.
  • This process must be repeated each semester an instrument is issued.

Dates and Deadlines

  • All Music Department instruments must be checked out EVERY semester.
  • All instruments must be returned to the Music Department in the same condition in which it was received.
  • Students are responsible for any damages or loss that may occur during the term of the agreement.
  • Instruments are due back to the Music Department BEFORE the last day of the regular semester.

Internships & Experiential Learning

Experiential Learning

Beyond the classroom, students participating in our academic programs in the Music Industry are encouraged to prepare themselves for their professional future by active participation in our multi-disciplinary organization, Lion Enterprises, which is comprised of the following divisions: Lion Records, Albright Music Publishing Group, Lion Management, and our Songwriters Organization.  We offer students access to hands-on, real-world experiences — as well as to develop their leadership skills — with an eye toward future business success in the music industry.  Lion Enterprises hosts the annual Albright Idol competition as well as a Music Business Forum that offers students the opportunity to meet high-profile music industry artists and business leaders.

Pre-Professional Internships

As our Music Industry Studies majors and Music Industry co-majors prepare to graduate, they must put their course work and creative experiences to the test by completing a pre-professional Internship. Recent students have gained hands-on experience (not to mention invaluable networking opportunities) by interning for such prestigious music industry companies as:

Atlantic Records
Columbia Records
Broad Street Music Group
Warner Music Group
EMI Gospel
Sony Red
The Mann Center for the Performing Arts
Bad Boy Entertainment
Allure Media Entertainment
Radio One Incorporated
+Vibes Productions
Rhythm & Blues Foundation
KG Enterprises
Win Win Global
Della Music Publishing LLC
Cheri Media Group/Hip HopDX
Reverb
Primary Wave
Haverford Music Festival
AMLA (Artists/Musicians of Latin America
ASCAP
‘stache media
Doghouse Records
Cross Keys Recording
WRAT 95.9 FM
DRP Record
Rockwood Music Corporation
Elam & SCott LLP
WMGK 102.9 FM
Worldwide Entertainment Group
MVD Entertainment Group
Helene Blue Musique Ltd.
Great Scott Broadcasting
Propulsion Media Labs
Tempo Music Therapy
Wired 96.5 FM
Radio One — 92Q Jams
All Star Music Empire
Premiere Studios NY
Astral Werks Records

Student Artistry & Scholarship

An integral part of the Liberal Arts approach to the study of music is the attention we pay to the relationship between process and product.  For many of our aspiring music industry students, this symbiotic relationship manifests itself as researching and writing, rehearsing and performing, or even composing and producing. A quick look below will offer you a glimpse into the wide range of creative and scholarly projects our students undertake.

ILYSSA DePONTE (Theatre ’13) partnered with Professor Adlai Binger during the summer of 2011 on an Albright Creative Research Experience (ACRE) project entitled, In Perfect Harmony: Writing for A Cappella Voices.  For ten weeks, Binger and DePonte worked side by side to create original choral arrangements for five songs that were then premiered by the Albright Angels and Mane Men during concerts throughout the 2011-2012 season.  More information at — http://www.albright.edu/spotlight/deponte.html and http://ilyssadeponte.wix.com/acappella#!

KAYLEIGH COGGINS (Communications ’13) in May of 2013, Kayleigh successfully defended her Senior Honors Thesis — The Grateful Dead: Pioneers of social media-like communities during Honors Week.

NICK HOMA (Music Business/Philosophy ’14) a guitarist and aspiring singer/songwriter, partnered with Professor Hal Weary during the summer of 2012 on an Albright Creative Research Experience (ACRE) project that generated Homa’s first album, Push. For ten weeks, Weary and Homa worked side by side to develop, record, edit, license, and market the full-length album that is available for sale in both physical and digital formats, distributed through retailers such as iTunes, Amazon, Rhapsody, and Spotify.  More info at https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/push/id922722065

SEAN O’NEILL (Music Business/Theatre ’14) graduated recently with departmental distinction in Theatre for creating and performing his senior voice recital, Night and Day.

MILTON McCAULEY (Music Industry Studies ’15) received critical praise in March 2014 for his work on his first solo album, Simple Pleasures.  The album (which is available on iTunes and Spotify), boasts a unique blend of new wave R&B and Soul sounds.  Songs from the album were debuted at a release party in Philadelphia at the Hard Rock Cafe. More information available at www.miltonmusiq.com