Fashion and Costume

Fashion is an integral part of our lives, reflecting our moods, culture and environment. It is a multi-billion dollar global enterprise that employs millions of people internationally in the design, manufacture, distribution, marketing, advertising and retailing of textiles, apparel, costumes and accessories. Both flexibility and focus are needed to succeed in the fashion industry, along with an understanding of the interrelationship among design, technology and business.

At Albright, we prepare you for a career in this dynamic and fast-paced industry by combining a rigorous liberal arts education with hands-on instruction in real-world skills and technology.


Fashion Department Mission

Complemented by a liberal arts education and interdisciplinary studies, the Fashion Department’s mission is to prepare students with knowledge, skills and credentials for successful contribution to the costume and fashion industries.  We prepare our students with the overall purpose of developing them into the best person they can be.


Why Fashion at Albright?

Fashion students at Albright take advantage of small classes and labs, innovative courses, and the support of experienced professors and dedicated alumni. All introductory sewing labs, for example, are capped at seven students, affording you the personal attention of your professor. The impressive resumes of Albright’s faculty attest to the industry and academic expertise (from corsets and costumes to retail and advertising) they offer to their students.

Albright is known as a premier institution for interdisciplinary study, and many fashion students take advantage of the opportunity to study their other passions. Students have combined fashion with communications, digital media, business, education and even psychology and political science. All students, whether or not they are co-majoring, are exposed to a traditional liberal arts curriculum: arts, humanities, and social science and physical science courses, with a focus on the relationships among fields of study. This core of courses polishes the critical thinking skills that are demanded in all professional fields and are expected in upper-level fashion positions.


What Can I Do With a Major in Fashion?


Our students:

  1. Develop effective oral, written, visual and digital communication skills
  2. Establish a global perspective of fashion and costume
  3. Practice and understand ethical conduct
  4. Demonstrate effective problem solving through critical thinking
  5. Demonstrate skill sets relevant to fashion and costume
  6. Set and demonstrate a high standard of professional conduct

Alumni

Erin Crilly photoErin Crilly ’15
Production assistant for Calvin Klein and Karl Lagerfeld handbags in New York City

For Erin Crilly ’15, change is good. After working for Ralph Lauren and hitting a career plateau, Crilly decided she wanted an opportunity to work for a growing company, and thus landed as a production assistant for Calvin Klein and Karl Lagerfeld handbags and accessories in New York City.

The change came at a good time for the fashion design and merchandising major. “I believe that learning is very important regardless of what point of your career you are in,” Crilly said. “When you start becoming bored or feeling as if you are doing the same ‘copy & paste’ tasks day after day, that is when anyone should take the opportunity to further themselves.”

With a to-do list that never seems to get any smaller, urgent matters that always come up, and the challenge of working with many different personalities, Crilly says she enjoys the constant challenges her current position provides.

At Albright, she enjoyed the small college environment. In fact, Crilly chose Albright College because it is a small liberal arts college. “Albright affords you the opportunity to see what other fields are about. A small liberal arts college makes you work 10 times harder to reach your goals. I owe Albright a big thank you for my courage and determination in the work world,” Crilly said.

While attending Albright, Crilly took advantage of the fashion program’s many trips to NYC to visit various fashion companies, offering a great experience and a fun day outside of class.

Her advice to current and future students is to never think you’re not capable of a position or do not have the experience needed. “Does anyone really have all the required experience many jobs look for? Put yourself out there and take on whatever challenge is put in front of you – you’ll become a whiz in no time,” she said. “Also, be realistic about finding a job. Many people expect to have these great jobs with huge salaries. Take the jobs at the bottom of the totem pole and work your way up – it’s the only way anyone learns!”


Vazzana photoCaroline Vazzana ’14
Editor, celebrity stylist, blogger at Making it in Manhattan

Caroline Vazzana ’14 has always had a flair for the fabulous. Her eye for fashion and trendy sense of style has led her to the fashion industry as an editor, celebrity stylist, creative consultant, and social influencer. The native New Yorker, who has always dreamt of shedding light on the industry for future fashionistas, is also the founder of the fashion blog Making it in Manhattan.

As a student at Albright, Vazzana took advantage of the wide variety of fashion courses that were offered. “Those courses ultimately helped me decide what I wanted to pursue,” she said. “At Albright, you’re given the opportunity to collaborate with students in so many different majors, which really prepared me for what working in the real world would be like.”

In the real world, Vazzana wears a different hat every day, both literally and figuratively. “One day I might be interviewing a designer for Making it in Manhattan, and another day I could be styling a cover shoot for a print magazine,” she said. “No two days are ever the same and the possibilities are really endless.”

Vazzana has fond memories of Albright, crediting her involvement in many different activities. “I wanted to go to a non-traditional fashion school so I could engage myself in a variety of different things. Not only was I the president of Club Vogue, an active member of the fashion department, and co-planned the annual fashion show my junior year, but I was also the captain of the cross-country and track and field teams. I think the diversity of my background really prepared me for my future.”

She also credits her professors with preparing her for a career in the fashion industry. “The professors were so encouraging of all of my ideas and really pushed and encouraged me every single step of the way,” she said.

To current and future students, Vazzana advises to never give up and to be nice to everyone. “Networking is the key to success,” she said. “Dream BIG! No goal is too out of reach and nothing is impossible. With hard work, determination, and a really good attitude, you can achieve anything.”


Evanosten photoErin VanOsten ’12
Design Manager, Jakks Pacific in Los Angeles

Ariel, Jasmine, Cinderella, Snow White… these names are familiar to every child who dreams of being a Disney princess. But behind every Disney princess product is a team of professionals like Erin Van Osten ’12, design manager at Jakks Pacific in Los Angeles. Van Osten oversees the design of princess costumes including dresses, shoes, wands and tiaras.

“I never thought I would be working at a toy company,” she said. “Who doesn’t remember that one special toy they received as a child? I’d like to think in some small way I’m providing that same special memory to children throughout the country and world.”

Van Osten loves the fun, creative atmosphere that she gets to work in every day. “We are constantly having brainstorming sessions and bouncing ideas off of each other, regardless of what team you are on.”

She chose Albright because of the costume design major, and has fond memories of working on the costumes for theatre productions in the costume shop. “I learned so much and really enjoyed seeing the productions and characters come to life with the costumes we created,” she said. Van Osten also enjoyed seeing her outfit walk the runway at the annual Fashion Showcase in 2011. “I worked really hard on that project,” she said. “It was very satisfying seeing it come down the runway and how everyone in the audience reacted to it.”

Van Osten’s advice to current and future students is to absorb and take in as much as you can, and learn how to communicate with people in person and over email. “Know construction, whether you think you are going into design, merchandising, or any other fashion career. It will help you no matter what,” she said. “Work hard and be passionate about your job. It goes a long way and people will notice.”


Lewis photoJaleesa Lewis ’11
Buying operations at Urban Outfitter

Some people crack under pressure. Then there’s Jaleesa Lewis ’11. The fashion design and merchandising major welcomes problems and troubleshooting at her job as buying operations at Urban Outfitters.

“There’s always some problem to troubleshoot at my job. I’m constantly learning new ways to resolve issues, which challenges me. It’s important to me to feel challenged in my position, which I feel, facilitates growth,” Lewis said.

As the “go-to” person for insuring merchandise gets to the Distribution Center and then to the appropriate stores for the Urban Renewal Brand and Intimates categories, Lewis sites organization as vital to success. “Being organized is key! Without having a system for all your responsibilities, things can easily fall by the wayside. I’m responsible for a little of everything, from the logistics point of view of the business and a lot of situations are time sensitive,” she said. “Business acumen is also important. It’s great to be efficient at one thing, but even better to know a little about everything and how different roles/teams work together toward the same business goal.”

Lewis chose Albright because of the teacher to student ratio, and the liberal arts program. She said Albright exceeded her expectations with the resources available and the education offered.

“Unlike bigger schools, where it may be more difficult to have relationships with the faculty, students at Albright are lucky to have these working relationships in order to gain advice for resumes, letters of recommendations and networking opportunities. I really appreciated learning how to network and build relationships early on, since I utilize those skills daily,” she added.

Her advice to current and future students is to network. “The relationships that you build in college can help you in the real world, and the skill set that it takes to build relationships will help on any team for your future career.”


Kelly photoEhrin Kelley ’09
Textile designer at Target
Read about Ehrin here.

 

 


Kyle photoKyle Bredbenner ’09
Visual Merchandising Manager, West Coast, Swarovski Crystal
Read about Kyle here.

 

 


Dudek photoAly Dudek ’08
Product developer and footwear designer for 3Dee International in Orange County, CA.
Read about Aly here.

 

 


Jones graphicErica Jones ’07
Senior designer at GK Elite Sportswear, lead designer on several U.S. gymnastics leotards for 2016 Olympics
Read about Erica here.

 

 


Cleaver photoJulianne Cleaver ’01
Owner: Bella Jules boutique, West Reading, PA.
Read about Julianne here.

 

 


Rose photoRose Q. Jamieson ’63
Author of High Fashion Hats, 1950-1980
Read about Rose here.

The Fashion Department offers the following majors:

  • Design and merchandising
  • Fashion merchandising
  • Fashion design
  • Costume design
  • Combine major in fashion

These areas possess a commonality of mission and provide you with a curriculum that addresses issues of creative research and development, design, manufacturing, marketing and the consumerism of textiles and apparel products.

Students majoring in fashion must complete the core requirements and the requirements for one of the tracks.

Core Requirements

  • FAS 105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS 112 Fashion Fundamentals (FAS 220 Costume Construction for Costume Design Majors)
  • FAS 200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS 203 Fashion History I
  • FAS 204 Fashion History II
  • FAS 482 Internship

Track Requirements
Design and Merchandising

  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS203 Fashion History I (Prehis.-18th Century)
  • FAS204 Fashion History II (19th-21st Century)
  • FAS482 Internship
  • FAS208 Fashion Business
  • FAS230 Fashion Illustration
  • FAS325 CAD
  • FAS355 Brand Development
  • BUS347 Marketing Management
  • FAS490 Senior Seminar*
  • ACC101 Principles of Accounting (General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning)
  • ART102 Life Drawing
  • Two of the following:
    • FAS218 Visual Merchandising
    • FAS210 Product Development
    • FAS309 Lifestyle Marketing
    • FAS315 Fashion Communications
    • FAS376 Retailing
    • BUS365 Small Business Management
    • FAS244 Patternmaking/Draping
    • FAS345 Electronic Patternmaking
    • FAS350 Advanced Construction
    • FAS372 Concept Development

* Students should choose one track for their internship and the other track for their senior seminar.

Fashion Merchandising

  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS203 Fashion History I (Prehis.-18th Century)
  • FAS204 Fashion History II (19th-21st Century)
  • FAS482 Internship
  • FAS208 Fashion Business
  • FAS210 Product Development
  • FAS309 Lifestyle Marketing
  • FAS315 Fashion Communications
  • BUS347 Marketing Management
  • FAS376 Retailing
  • FAS490C Senior Seminar, Merchandising
  • ECO105 Economics (General Studies Foundations Social Science)
  • ACC101 Financial Accounting (General Studies Foundations Quantitative)
  • One of the following:
    • BUS365 Small Business Management
    • BUS346 Management Principles
    • FAS218 Visual Merchandising

Fashion Design

  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS203 Fashion History I (Prehis.-18th Century)
  • FAS204 Fashion History II (19th-21st Century)
  • FAS482 Internship
  • FAS230 Fashion Illustration
  • FAS244 Patternmaking/Draping
  • FAS355 Brand Development
  • FAS325 CAD
  • FAS345 Electronic Patternmaking
  • FAS350 Advanced Construction
  • FAS372 Concept Development
  • FAS490 A Senior Seminar Design
  • ART102 Life Drawing

Costume Design

  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS220 Costume Construction
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS203 Fashion History I (Prehis.-18th Century)
  • FAS204 Fashion History II (19th-21st Century)
  • FAS482 Internship
  • THR201 Production Experience (four productions)
  • FAS230 Fashion Illustration
  • FAS244 Patternmaking/Draping
  • FAS325 CAD
  • THR210 Design Fundamentals
  • FAS320 Stage Costuming
  • FAS490B Senior Seminar Costume
  • THR101 Creative Process (General Studies Foundations Fine Arts)
  • THR288 Great Ages of Theatre I or THR289 Great Ages of Theatre II
  • Suggested Elective: THR214 Stage Make Up

Combined Major

The following requirements are for students matriculating Fall 2015 and after. Students who matriculated before Fall 2015 see the requirements below.

  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS203 Fashion History I (Prehistoric-18th Century) OR FAS204 Fashion History II (19th- 21st Century)
  • FAS490 Senior Seminar
  • ECO105 Economics (General Studies Foundations Social Science) OR ART103 Design (General Studies Foundations Fine Art)
  • Two of the following:
    • FAS208 Fashion Business
    • FAS210 Product Development
    • FAS218 Visual Merchandising
    • FAS230 Fashion Illustration
    • FAS244 Patternmaking/Draping
    • FAS315 Fashion Communications
    • FAS325 CAD
    • FAS376 Retailing

The following requirements are for students matriculating before Fall 2015.

Combined Majors
Fashion Merchandising Combined Major

  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals
  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS203 Fashion History I (Prehistoric-18th Century) OR FAS204 Fashion History II (19th- 21st Century)
  • FAS490C Senior Seminar in Merchandising
  • ECO105 Economics (General Studies Foundations Social Science) OR ACC101 Accounting (General Studies Foundations Quantitative)
  • Select two of the following:
    • FAS208 Fashion Business
    • FAS218 Visual Merchandising
    • FAS210 Product Development
    • FAS376 Retailing
    • FAS309 Lifestyle Marketing
    • FAS315 Fashion Communications
    • BUS347 Marketing Management
    • BUS365 Small Business Management

Fashion Design Combined Major 

  • FAS112 Fashion Fundamentals
  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS203 Fashion History I (Prehistoric-18th Century) OR FAS204 Fashion History II (19th-21st Century)
  • FAS490A Senior Seminar in Design
  • ART102 Life Drawing
  • Select two of the following:
    • FAS230 Design and Illustration
    • FAS244 Patternmaking/Draping
    • FAS325 CAD
    • FAS372 Concept Development, Fashion Design
    • FAS350 Advanced Construction
    • FAS355 Brand Development

Costume Design Combined Major 

  • FAS220 Costume Construction
  • FAS105 Visual Literacy
  • FAS200 Textile Fundamentals
  • FAS203 Fashion History I (prehistoric-18th Century) OR FAS204 Fashion History II (19th-21st Century)
  • FAS490B Senior Seminar in Costume
  • THR101 Creative Process (General Studies Foundations Fine Arts)
  • Select two of the following:
    • FAS230 Design and Illustration
    • FAS244 Patternmaking/Draping
    • FAS325 CAD
    • FAS320 Stage Costuming
    • THR201 Production Experience (four productions)
    • THR288 Great Ages of Theatre I or THR289 Great Ages of Theatre II

FAS 105
Visual Literacy for Fashion
The focus of this foundation design course is to explore the basic elements and principles of 2D and 3D design and their application in the fashion design process. Visual communication—using messages that combine words and pictures—is an essential skill in the fashion industry. It is the language most often used by designers and merchandisers in communicating with each other and their clients. Line, shape, texture, value, color and their interrelationships are studied and applied to solving design problems. Students learn to use these components to demonstrate thoughts and concepts through visual illustrations and graphic design.

FAS 112
Fashion Fundamentals
This course serves as a general introduction to the fashion industry and to the study of fashion. The course outlines the factors, processes and considerations involved in taking fashion products from concept to the customer. In addition to the lecture, students must attend one three-hour lab session, where they gain hands-on experience in the conception and production of a fashion product.

FAS 200
Textile Fundamentals
A study of fabrics with emphasis on the interrelationships of fibers, yarn structures, fabric construction and finishes. Students examine the physical and chemical structures of natural and man-made fibers. They explore how the different physical characteristics, history and components of different fabrics relate to end use. Government legislation related to textiles is discussed.

FAS 203
Costume and Fashion History to 1800
This course focuses on the influence of fashion and dress throughout history. The course covers a timeline starting around 3000 BC and continuing to the 18th century. The purpose is to gain not only knowledge of the actual garments of the time, but also an understanding of why they were worn. Knowledge of the historical context will be an important thread throughout this course. The course will use an interdisciplinary approach to studying fashion history that combines lectures, activities, exams and a presentation.

FAS 204
Costume and Fashion History from 1800
This course focuses on the development of western fashion, from the French Revolution to the present, and to the evolution from custom-made clothing to ready-to-wear. It stresses the relationship of historic occurrences with changes in the arts, particularly in the development of American fashion. Specific silhouettes and details of each period of fashion are studied, in addition to fashion designers and theatrical costume interpretation of various periods of history.

FAS 208
Fashion Business
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of the financial aspects of the fashion business. Special emphasis is placed on understanding and making managerial decisions based on review of the income statement, focusing on both gross margin and profit before taxes. Pricing and markdown strategies are discussed, and the basic retail math concepts of initial mark-up and maintained mark-up are covered in depth. Students create a six-month merchandising plan that teaches them to forecast sales, inventory levels and reductions, enabling them to calculate planned purchases and open to buy. Also discussed are measures of productivity such as sales per square foot and GMROI.

FAS 210
Fashion Product Development
This course analyzes the process of creating fashion products from trend research through design to production/sourcing to distribution. It introduces concepts and methods used by buyers, merchandisers and designers to create merchandise for targeted customer segments.

Prerequisites: FAS 105, 112

FAS 218
Visual Merchandising
This course is a comprehensive introduction to the practices and effective strategies in the field of retail visual merchandising. Students learn to look, compare and innovate as they implement proven principles used in the presentation of merchandise through free expression utilizing both solo and group activities to develop critical thinking and communications skills. Prerequisites: FAS 105, 112

FAS/THR 220
Costume Construction
This course will explore the techniques of costume and period clothing construction. The class will cover history of garment pattern development, sewing techniques and the creation of historic clothing using modern patterning and sewing techniques. As a final project for this class, students will be expected to create a complete period costume from concept to wearable three dimensional garment.

FAS 230
Fashion Illustration
The focus of this course is to give students a thorough knowledge of fashion of figure proportions, fashion poses and proficiency in illustrating them including: understanding the difference in illustration styles and skills required for marketing and designing; choosing the best media and employing it skillfully; and using their fashion illustrations in presentations that effectively communicate their ideas. Prerequisite: FAS 105

FAS 244
Patternmaking/Draping
This course introduces the student to techniques and skills in flat pattern making and draping. The student will learn how to create and manipulate a sloper set and become familiar with draping garments on a full-size dress form to produce creative and innovative designs. The course also teaches students a common language of correct terminology so they will be able to communicate accurately with pattern makers and designers within the fashion industry. Prerequisite: FAS 112

FAS 290
Art and Fashion in Europe
This course focuses on an essential collection of globalization and cross-cultural educational concepts. Students visit cultural and fashion industry sites to learn about cultural influences on modern art and fashion. Students will also visually immerse in European art and artifacts that will be utilized in their fashion study. In addition, students will have the opportunity to explore the street art and fashion in European communities. Finally, the purpose of this course serves to offer students a chance to combine their multicultural and global perspective with a design ideation, concept development, research, and presentation. Photo documentation and journal entries will be used to visualize and explore their study abroad experiences. Personal study and investigation will be important in the success of this course. At the end of the course, students will have a versatile sketchbook journal of the trip that exhibits their experiences and will be shared through a power point presentation. General Studies Connections-Global-Humanities

FAS 309
Lifestyle Marketing
This course introduces the theories and practices of meeting consumers’ needs by creating and marketing fashion products that appeal to consumer lifestyles. It examines the art of branding as a powerful tool in developing and maintaining customer loyalty. Prerequisites: FAS 105, 112

FAS 315
Fashion Communications
This is a study of the marketing and promotional strategies used within the fashion communication field. Students study the purposes, procedures, methods and techniques used in various fashion promotional activities. Special attention is given to writing techniques and layouts used in printed fashion communications. Prerequisites: FAS 105, 112

FAS/THR 320
Stage Costuming
This course is an introduction to the process of costume design and production. Topics covered include period costume research, play analysis, budgeting and costume rendering. The course will also introduce costume studio personnel and their responsibilities in the costume design/production process. Prerequisites: FAS 105, 112

FAS 325
CAD Concepts
This course focuses on the purpose of CAD technology in the fashion industry for design ideation, concept development, research and presentation. Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop will be used to emphasis visualization and exploration of design ideas, along with knowledge of technical skills. Students will apply appropriate CAD techniques to create artistic and technical flat illustrations. Personal study and investigation will be important in the success of this course. At the end of the course, students should have a versatile portfolio of projects that exhibit knowledge and skill of CAD as used in the fashion industry. Prerequisites: FAS 105, 112

FAS 326
CAD Concepts II
This course is a continuation of CAD I. Utilizing Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, students will further develop their computer-aided technical drawing skills. Additionally, they will study the basics of creating and utilizing textile patterns and textures and will develop techniques to create professional presentations. Computer skills are employed in the implementation of in-depth design projects. Each project is designed to promote individual creativity and thoughtful market and creative research, and to develop effective verbal and visual presentation techniques. For each project, students are required to present written and visual research and to show their process of exploration and refinement in creating and presenting a collection based on that research. Prerequisite: FAS 325

FAS 345
Electronic Patternmaking
The students will learn the skill sets of computerized patternmaking as it applies to the fashion industry. A focus will be given to the interpretation of design flats as they influence the design of pattern. At the end of the course, students will produce design garment by using Modaris Patternmaking software. Students should also have a versatile patternmaking portfolio of projects that exhibit knowledge and skill of CAD as used in the fashion industry.

FAS 350
Advanced Construction Techniques
This course emphasizes development of apparel construction skills at an intermediate level. Students continue to evolve principles by which flat pattern method is used in the development of design idea. Emphasis is on tailoring procedures, which are used in everyday dressmaking. In course work, students will learn how to select the tailoring method most appropriate for their fabric and pattern choice, as well as for their skill level and available sewing time.

FAS 355
Brand Development
In this course, students will develop a professional fashion portfolio that showcases their best skills by incorporating previous completed work. It includes learning about presentation layout styles and focuses on developing a strong personal brand identity that reflects the visual narrative of work. Execution of the portfolio will be explored in both visual and electronic web formats.

FAS 372
Concept Development, Fashion Design
This course focuses on the process of forming an idea and bringing that idea from concept to reality, specifically with regard to end products related to the fashion business. Students learn how to research, recognize or create trends, and apply aesthetics, taste, design techniques, practical considerations and problem-solving strategies in the implementation of targeted concept development projects. Prerequisites: FAS 105, 112

FAS 373
Concept Development, Costuming
Techniques and principles of fashion design are applied to the special demands of costuming for the theater, emphasizing the need for durability while creating the appropriate visual image. The day-to-day problems of assembling a show are explored. Students work on a current play by the Theatre Department and collaborate to design and also create the costumes for specific themes or time periods. Prerequisites: FAS 105, 112

FAS 376
Retailing
This course provides a comprehensive understanding of the retailing industry. It focuses on the development of retail strategy and familiarizes the student with all the major decisions retailers must make as they strive to compete in an ever-changing environment. Prerequisites: FAS 105, 112

FAS 383
Electronic Patternmaking
Student will learn the skill sets of computerized pattern making as it applies to the fashion industry. A focus will be given to the interpretation of design flats as they influence the design of patterns. Prerequisites: FAS 105, 112, 244

FAS 482
Internship
Students serve an internship in the fashion industry or a fashion industry-related business under the supervision of a faculty member and on-site personnel. Active participation and a significant level of responsibilities are expected in the internship setting. Reports and projects are required.

FAS 490
Senior Seminar
The senior seminar is a capstone course for all fashion students. Building on previous knowledge from the program, this course prepares students to enter the fashion industry. Special emphasis is placed on discussing issues current to the industry and researching the job market. Industry guest speakers are scheduled throughout the semester to enhance this experience. Working with instructor direction and approval, each student is required to complete a capstone project that requires intense research and a final presentation. Prerequisites: FAS 105, 112

fashion-and-costume

Doreen Burdalski, M.B.A.

Chair of Fashion Department; Assistant Professor of Merchandising

610-921-7811
dburdalski@albright.edu

fashion-and-costume

Damayanthie Eluwawalage, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Fashion Design

610-921-7844
deluwawalage@albright.edu

fashion-and-costume

MeeAe Oh-Ranck, M.S.

Instructor of Fashion

610-921-7891
moh-ranck@albright.edu

fashion-and-costume

Paula Trimpey, M.F.A.

Associate Professor of Theatre & Fashion, Costume Shop Coordinator

610-921-7732
ptrimpey@albright.edu

fashion-and-costume

Amanda Condict

Adjunct Professor in Fashion

610-921-7779
acondict@albright.edu

fashion-and-costume

Sara Nelson '08

Adjunct Professor in Fashion

610-921-7779
snelson@albright.edu

fashion-and-costume

Denise Shade

Adjunct Professor in Fashion

610-921-7779
dshade@albright.edu

Find Albright Fashion on:

Facebook   Twitter   Instagram


Fashion Lion

Click below to read Albright College’s award-winning, student-created Fashion publication.

Fashion Lion

News

Save the Date! Summer Fashion Studio July 29 – August 3, 2018
Albright College Again Named One of the Best Fashion Schools in the Country
Albright College Partnering with 13th & Union Elementary School on Cultural Exchange Project and Fashion Runway Show
Albright Style Gurus Chronicling Campus Fashion Trends for Popular Website

Student Research and Scholarship

Through the Albright Creative Research Experience (ACRE), Albright students have the opportunity to conduct research or creative activity in partnership with nurturing faculty mentors. Recent Albright Creative Research Experience (ACRE) projects include:

Lindsey Jones, “Classical Ballet Tutu Construction” (with Paula Trimpey)
Camille Fuller, “Genuine Color: An Exploration of Natural Dying” (with MeeAe Oh-Ranck)
Alfredo Diaz, “The Magic of Geometric and Organic Shapes in Fashion: A Study in Haute Couture” (with MeeAe Oh-Ranck)
Kylah Freeman, “Fashion Law: U.S. Legislation Impacting the Fashion Industry” (with Doreen Burdalski)
Susie Benitez, “From Fleece to Yarn: An Exploration of Textile Hand Spinning” (with Paula Trimpey)
Alfredo Diaz, “The Simple Sheath Dress: A Challenge in Creative Pattern Making” (with Paula Trimpey)
Alexandra Seda, “Then and Now: The History and Evolution of the Clerical Stole” (with Paula Trimpey)
Susie Benitez, “From Fleece to Yarn: An Exploration of Textile Hand Spinning” (with Paula Trimpey)
Carrie Rivera, “Attire of a Female Leader in the Byzantine Era” (with Paula Trimpey)
Kayla Haruluck, “Tight Lace Corsets and Corset Construction” (with Paula Trimpey)
Jaime Goldschmidt, “Reinterpreted Adornment” (with Jocelyn Kolb)


Internships

Anna Sui, NY
Anthropologie, New York,  NY
Bella Jules, West Reading, PA
Boscovs, Reading, PA
Eileen Fisher, New York, NY
David’s Bridal, Conshohocken, PA
Donna Karan, New York, NY
Disney World, Orlando, FL
Firefly on Penn, West Reading, PA
Gucci, NY
Isaac Mizrahi, New York, NY
LiliBea’s, West Reading, PA
Maggie Norris Couture, NY
Majestic Athletic, Easton, PA
Marie Claire, NY
Michael Kors, NY
New York & Company, New York, NY
Nordstrom, Cherry Hill, NJ
Palma, San Benedetto del Tronto, Italy
QVC, West Chester, PA
Ripkin Baseball, Aberdeen, MD
Sorelli Jewery, Kutztown, PA
Tiffany & Co., Philadelphia
Utah Shakespearean Festival, Utah
Wet Seal, Wyomissing, PA


Events

Student Work