Environmental Science

The interdisciplinary nature of the environmental science major allows students to address a wide range of contemporary questions through the natural sciences of biology, ecology, earth sciences, chemistry and the social sciences including political science, sociology, economics, psychology and philosophy. The concentration is designed for science students wishing to pursue careers in environmental research/technology and resource management or pursue graduate study in an environmental field.

Students interested in this concentration should contact Professors David Osgood, Ph.D. or Stephen Mech, Ph.D. in the Biology Department.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The interdisciplinary nature of the environmental science major (see interdisciplinary studies) allows students to address a wide range of contemporary questions through the natural sciences of biology, ecology, earth sciences, chemistry, the social sciences including political science, sociology, economics, and psychology and the humanities of history and philosophy. The major is designed for science students wishing to pursue careers in environmental research/technology and resource management or pursue graduate study in an environmental field.

Requirements:

Environmental Science majors must take:

ESS 101 and 400
Seven courses within the science/math core:
– BIO 152 and either 151 or 203
– BIO 200 (fulfills general studies quantitative reasoning requirement)
– BIO 211
– CHEM 105 (fulfills general studies natural science requirement)
– CHEM 106 and 207
ESS 325
Two courses from each of the following three groups:
– Biological Group: BIO 214, BIO 220, BIO 246, BIO 318, BIO 319, BIO 337, BIO 491, BIO 494, ESS 298
– Physical Science Group: BIO 312, BIO/ESS 315, ESS 205, ESS 310
– Socio-Political-Cultural Group:  ANT/PSY 265, ANT/IDS 285, POL 214, POL 320, POL 321, ECO 224, HIS 280, PHI 270, PSY 350, REL 280, SOC 291, ESS 260, ESS 298

Two of the four choices from the biological and physical science groups must be field-based laboratory courses. Students should be aware that some graduate programs in the environmental fields also require a semester of calculus and physics and two semesters of organic chemistry. Students are also encouraged to participate in an overseas field course (ESS 280 – Martinique StudiesESS 298 – Ecological and Anthropological Field Study in Peru; SPP J51 – Protecting Endangered Species: Hawaiian Humpback Whale; IDS J61 – Subtropical Ecosphere). Students interested in this major should contact Professors Osgood or Mech in the Biology Department.


What Can I do With a Major in
Environmental Science