Crime and Justice

The Political Science, Psychology and Sociology Departments offer a crime and justice interdisciplinary major, which focuses on the legal, political, administrative, psychological and sociological analysis of criminal deviance and societal responses to crime.

What can I do with a major in Crime and Justice?

This academic program prepares students for jobs and careers in any of the three major areas of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, the course, and corrections. Students who graduate with this major have many opportunities in police and security fields (including FBI and secret service), the legal bar, the judiciary system, and corrections & probation.  Jobs include lawyer, US marshal, FBI agent, paralegal, and many more.  Check out the complete list at Albright’s Experiential Learning & Career Development Center details on what you can do with a major in crime and justice.

 

The Crime and Justice Academic Program

The courses in the crime and justice interdisciplinary major provide students with a broad-based understanding of:

->traditional and contemporary theoretical explanations of criminal behavior;

->current patterns related to the incidence and prevalence of crime and victimization in contemporary society;

->methodological and statistical techniques used to measure and analyze criminal deviance;

->implications and ramifications of criminal deviance for society in general and for its individual members;

->and an understanding of the broader political, legal, and ethical contexts in which the criminal justice system operates.

For post-traditional students, Albright College also offers an undergraduate major in Crime & Justice.

 

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Charles Brown, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology; Department Chair
610-921-7865
cbrown@albright.edu

crime-and-justice

Gwendolyn Seidman, Ph.D.
Gwendolyn Seidman, Associate Professor of Psychology and Department Chair
610-929-6742
gseidman@albright.edu

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Justin J. Couchman, Ph.D.
Justin J. Couchman, Associate Professor of Psychology
610-929-6738
jcouchman@albright.edu

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Marsha Green, Ph.D.
Marsha Green, Professor of Psychology
610-921-7580
mgreen@albright.edu

crime-and-justice

Bridget A. Hearon, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Psychology
610-929-6556
bhearon@albright.edu

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Julia Heberle, Ph.D.
Julia Heberle, Associate Professor of Psychology
610-921-7581
jheberle@albright.edu

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Susan Hughes, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology, Director of Evolutionary Studies Program
610-929-6732
shughes@albright.edu

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Brenda Ingram-Wallace, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Psychology
610-921-7585
bingramwallace@albright.edu

crime-and-justice

Irene Langran, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Chair of Political Science; Program Director, International Relations; Program Director, Public Health
610-921-7570
ilangran@albright.edu

crime-and-justice

Carla Abodalo, MS
Senior Instructor of Sociology
610-921-7592
cabodalo@albright.edu

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Michael A. Armato, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Political Science
610-929-6622
marmato@albright.edu

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Brian Jennings, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology
610-921-7892
bjennings@albright.edu

crime-and-justice

Elizabeth Kiester, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Sociology
610-921-7885
ekiester@albright.edu

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Kennon Rice, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology
610-921-7881
krice@albright.edu

crime-and-justice

Barton Thompson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology
610-921-7593
bthompson@albright.edu

crime-and-justice

Teri Jensen-Sellers, M.A.
Adjunct Lecturer in Sociology
610-929-6729
tjensen-sellers@albright.edu

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Adrienne Lodge, M.S., C.F.E., C.A.M.S.
Adjunct Lecturer in Sociology-Criminal Justice
610-929-6768
alodge@albright.edu

Requirements:

  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
    (fulfills General Studies Foundations Social Science requirement)
  • SOC 202 The Criminal Justice System
  • SOC 210 Research Methods
  • SOC 211 Statistics (fulfills General Studies Foundations Quantitative Reasoning requirement)
    • May take PSY 200 Research Methods I and PSY 201 Research Methods II in place of SOC 210 and 211
  • SOC 213 Social Theory
  • SOC 251 Crime and Deviance
  • Any two of the following:
    – SOC 253 Criminal Investigation and SOC 254 Advanced Criminal Investigation (must take both courses)
    – ANT 310 Crime, Culture and Conflict Resolution
    – SOC 302 Juvenile Delinquency
    – SOC 305 Terrorism
    – SOC 307 Organized Crime
    – SOC 309 Criminal Corrections
    – SOC 311 Domestic Violence
    – SOC 360 Crime & the Media
    – SOC 385 Violence & Victims
  • One of the following:
    – SOC 440 Ethnographics in Crime
    – SOC 450 White Collar Crime
    – SOC 460 Serial Murder
  • SOC 490 Senior Seminar
  • POL 101 American Government
  • POL 400-level Senior Seminar in Political Science
  • Two of the following:
    – POL 214 Public Policy
    – POL 216 Law & Society
    – POL 218 Public Administration
    – POL 231/331 Criminal Law
    – POL 310 Metropolitan Politics
  • PSY 100 General Psychology
  • Two of the following:
    – PSY 206 Social Psychology
    – PSY 220 Theories/Treatment of Addictive Behaviors
    – PSY 230 Human Development
    – PSY 240 Child Development
    – PSY 250 Theories of Personality
    – PSY 355 Motivation
    – PSY 390 Adult Psychopathology and Behavior Disorders
    – PSY 391 Child Psychopathology and Behavior Disorders
  • POL 205 Comparative Politics or PSY 291 Cross Cultural Psychology of SOC262 Social Stratification

What Can I do With a Major in Crime and Justice?