Chemistry & Biochemistry | Albright College

Chemistry & Biochemistry

Chemistry is the study of matter and the changes it undergoes. The study of chemistry is broad and far-reaching, the perfect discipline to be part of a liberal arts and sciences education such as Albright’s.

There are so many questions that are answered by chemistry – and even more that are yet to be answered. In our modern lives, we are living longer and more productive lives through chemistry. Of course, the pathway to some of those inventions has been littered with the casualties of the misuse or misunderstanding of chemistry. With the knowledge this history in chemistry provides, humans can move forward using chemistry to benefit the planet with concern for the environment and its limited resources.

If you have an innate curiosity and a scientifically oriented mindset, you could choose chemistry or biochemistry as your path of study. The solution to problems as diverse as cures for diseases and answers to world energy needs, just to name a few, will be unlocked through innovative research that includes chemical principles.

Albright Chemistry and Biochemistry students:

1. Gain knowledge of theories in the field:

  • They are prepared for graduate degree programs, professional degree programs, and industrial or government employment
  • They possess sufficient foundational knowledge in each of the five core areas of chemistry: analytical, biological, inorganic, organic, and physical.

2. Apply knowledge in the field:

  • They display competent oral communication in chemistry
  • They demonstrate competent written communication in chemistry
  • They have the ability to assess standard text, reference, and literature resources.

3. Establish proficiency in the laboratory

  • They exhibit competent laboratory techniques and data collection abilities
  • They manifest proficient analysis and interpretation of results

 

Recent Graduates

Sierra Lambeth ’18

  • Research and internships: Independent research; Investigating the Fluctuations in Single-Molecule Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, Presented at the American Chemical Society Meeting Spring 2016,  Fall 2016, and the National Conference on Undergraduate Research in 2017
  • Current placement: Graduate student in chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania

Ashley Lipshaw ’18

  • Research and internships: Independent research; Synthesis, Characterization and Reactivity of Borate Ceramics, Presented at the American Chemical Society Meeting Spring 2016,  Fall 2016, and the National Conference on Undergraduate Research in 2017
  • Current placement: Post-baccalaureate program at Thomas Jefferson, planning to apply to medical school for Fall 2019

Brittany Slaughterbeck ’18

  • Research and internships: Independent research; Analysis of parabens in over-the-counter cosmetics by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and their binding affinity to bovine serum albumin by fluorescence spectroscopy
  • Current placement: Patient Access Representative at Crozer-Keystone Health System

Sarah Boothman ’18

  • Research and internships: Independent research;haracterization of an epidermal growth factor ortholog encoded by ectromelia virus
  • Current placement: Graduate Student in biological sciences at Carnegie Mellon

Haleigh Hunt ’18

  • Research and internships: Internship; quality control technician at Reitech
  • Current placement: Master’s candidate in forensic science at Temple University

Christine Johnson ’18

  • Research and internships: Internship; quality control technician at Reitech
  • Current placement: Master’s candidate in cosmetic science at Farleigh Dickinson and chemist at AromaFloria

Justin Hoffman ’18

  • Research and internships: Independent research; Bat Population Surveying
  • Current placement: Laboratory Technician at University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, planning to apply to VMD/PhD programs for Fall 2019

Vincent Torres ’17

  • Research and internships: Independent research; Synthesis and Characterization of Glassy Materials
  • Current placement: Graduate student in chemistry at the Pennsylvania State University

Caroline Endy ’17

  • Research and internships: Independent research; Synthesis and Characterization of Redox Active Aluminum Complexes
  • Current placement: Scientist at Dow Chemical

 

Graduate and Professional School

Albright students are regularly placed in respected law, medical, dental, optometry and veterinary schools, as well as graduate programs in specialized areas of biochemistry, chemistry AND biology. For further information about pre-professional programs please click here. Recent Albright graduates have gone on to study at these institutions:

  • Cornell University
  • The Johns Hopkins University
  • Lehigh University
  • Northwestern University
  • Penn State College of Medicine
  • Pennsylvania State University
  • Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Princeton University
  • University of Pennsylvania
  • Yale University

 

Career Opportunities

Recent Albright graduates in chemistry and biochemistry have found job opportunities with these organizations and companies:

  • Air Products
  • Bayer Corporation
  • Baxter Healthcare
  • Carpenter Technology
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • Fox Chase Cancer Center
  • Glaxo SmithKline
  • The Johns Hopkins University
  • Kimberly Clark
  • Lancaster Laboratories
  • Merck and Company
  • National Institutes of Health

Major in Chemistry
Requirements

  • CHE 105 and 106 (should be completed in the first year)
  • CHE 207 and 208
  • CHE 321, 322, 323, 324, 325
  • CHE 411 and 412
  • MAT 131 and 132 (should be completed in the first year)
  • PHY 201 and 202
  • CHE 255 (formerly IDS 255)
  • A research experience is recommended.

Completion of these requirements for the degree results in accreditation in chemistry  by the Committee on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society.

Students interested in graduate work in chemistry may wish to consider a course in computer science and additional courses in mathematics and physics.


Interdisciplinary Major in Biochemistry
An interdisciplinary program for students interested in biochemistry is specially designed for those who plan ON professional careers in medicine, medical technology, pharmacology, bacteriology, cellular biology, molecular biology, microbiology, toxicology or physiology.

Requirements

  • CHE 105 and 106
  • CHE 207 and 208
  • CHE 321, 322, 325, 326
  • BIO 151, 203, 325
  • MAT 131 and 132
  • PHY 201 and 202
  • One of the following:
    • CHE 411
    • CHE 412
    • CHE 420
    • BIO 490
    • BIO 495
    • BIO 496
    • BIO 498
  • A research experience is recommended.

Biochemistry majors who wish to receive accreditation in biochemistry by the Committee on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society must elect CHE 323 and 324 in addition to the required courses and select either CHE411 or CHE412 as their 400-level course. Students interested in graduate work in biochemistry and related fields may wish to consider additional courses from the 400-level courses (listed above) or from CHE 323 and 324 and BIO 321, 322 and 333.

Since biochemistry is already an interdisciplinary program, no courses are dropped from this program to create a combined program in biochemistry. However, this does not preclude you from combining biochemistry with another program.


Environmental Chemistry
Our program in environmental chemistry provides a sound general background in chemistry with a specific emphasis on the chemistry of the environment. It prepares you for graduate programs in chemistry, environmental chemistry and environmental science; for immediate employment in solving environmental problems; or for further study in a variety of other professional programs. The program emphasizes practical experience in solving environmental problems.

Requirements

  • CHE 105 and 106
  • CHE 207 and 208
  • CHE 321, 322, 323, 324
  • CHE 420
  • MAT 131 and 132
  • PHY 201 and 202
  • BIO 151 and 152
  • ESS 101 and 400
  • A research experience is recommended.

Students interested in graduate work in environmental chemistry and related fields may wish to consider elective courses from the following:

  • BIO 211, 381, 481 and 482
  • CHE 325, 326, 381, 411, 412, 481 and 482
  • CHE 255 (formerly IDS 255).

Secondary Chemistry Education

Chemistry Majors preparing for a career in education take Chemistry courses and a series of Education and other courses specified by the Education Department to meet Pennsylvania Department of Education regulations. As early as possible in their college experience, candidates for teacher certification in Chemistry should consult the Requirements section of the Education website and the chair of Education regarding specific course requirements. The Chemistry Education certification program is a grades 7-12 program.


Combined Major in Chemistry
Requirements

  • CHE 105 and 106
  • CHE 207 and 208
  • CHE 321 and 322
  • Two of the following
    • CHE 323
    • CHE 324
    • CHE 325
    • CHE 326
  • One 400 level chemistry

MAT 131 and 132 and PHY 201 and 202 (prerequisites for CHE 321 and 322)


CHE 100
Chemistry and Society

This course is an introduction to the Natural Sciences through the study of relevant scientific issues set in their political, economic, social, international and ethical context. The course content enables students to learn the specific natural science of chemistry in the framework of their own lives and significant issues facing science and the world.  The chemical content is presented as needed to provide a basis for the understanding of these topics. The laboratory consists of an introduction to scientific methods and obserbation essential to the study of the natural sciences. Observations are based on data rooted in a material explanation of the natural world.  Analysis of data includes an inductive reasoning approach. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. This course satisfies the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement.

CHE 101
The Natural Science of Daily Life
This course provides an exploration of the science that underpins everyday life. In this course, students will gain an appreciation of how the natural sciences are essential to the common items of daily life. As illustrations, students will examine the science behind objects such as wine and cheese, candles, tablecloths, silverware, flowers and MP3 players. This investigation will transform their perspective from end-users to informed individuals. Lectures will focus on examples of theory and experiment in a range of fields within the natural sciences, and the connection between natural sciences and other areas explored in the General Studies curriculum. Laboratory work and field trips will be dedicated to investigating the phenomena discussed during lectures using an inquiry-based approach. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. This course satisfies the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement.

CHE 102
The Science of Food & Cooking
This course is designed to use food and cooking as a means to learn biochemistry. After exploring some basic biochemistry, explore various food types, such as fruits, vegetables, beer, wine, bread, baked goods, chocolates, candy, meat, milk, cheese, eggs and custards. Students will implement experiments with food aimed at exploring questions and testing hypotheses to develop their critical thinking skills. Students will need access to a kitchen with some basic cooking equipment and will purchase food for the laboratory component. This course satisfies the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement.

CHE 103
Introduction to Forensic Science
This course is designed for student observation and comprehension of the basic physical and biological sciences and their influence within forensic science. Topic selection is based on the most frequently encountered scenarios for practicing forensic scientists. Lectures center around evidence documentation and recovery; fingerprint and impression collection; body fluid/product preservation and examination; DNA analysis; toxicology; firearms; fire and explosion; and court conduct and testimony. The laboratory consists of an introduction to scientific observation and experimentation and some of the basic operations used during investigations in applied forensics. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. This course satisfies the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement.

CHE 104
Physical Science
This course introduces students to phenomena in the physical world and helps them understand the relationships that govern these phenomena within the Natural Sciences. Topics include the structure of matter, chemical bonds and reactions, laws of motion and gravity, electromagnetism, and the study of heat, sound and light.  The laboratory consists of an introduction to scientific methods and obserbation essential to the study of the natural sciences. Observations are based on data rooted in a material explanation of the natural world.  Analysis of data includes an inductive reasoning approach.Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. This course satisfies the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement.

CHE 105
General Analytical Chemistry I
This course is an intensive study of the main concepts of chemistry, and covers qualitative and quantitative descriptions of matter and reactivity. The description of matter includes the atomic and subatomic scale (atomic structure, bonding, geometry and intermolecular forces) and the macroscopic scale (phases of matter and solutions). Reactivity topics include basic patterns of reactivity, reaction stoichiometry and thermochemistry. Both conceptual learning and quantitative problem solving are emphasized. The laboratory program consists of an introduction to scientific methods and observation specifically involving inorganic synthesis and qualitative analysis. Observations are based on data rooted in a material explanation of the natural world.  Analysis of data includes an inductive reasoning approach. Four hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. This course satisfies the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement typically for students planning to major in chemistry, biochemistry, biology or a related field. Facility with algebra is assumed.

CHE 106
General Analytical Chemistry II
This course is a continuation of CHE 105 covering kinetics, equilibrium, spontaneity and an introduction to inorganic chemistry. Within these topics, acid-base (proton transfer equilibrium) chemistry, electrochemistry (electron transfer equilibrium) and solubility (solid-ion equilibrium) are discussed. The introduction to inorganic chemistry includes descriptive chemistry of metals and nonmetals, coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry and environmental chemistry. The laboratory program focuses on quantitative analysis with an introduction to the use of chemical instrumentation. Facility with algebra is assumed. Four hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: CHE 105 (The Department strongly recommends a C- or better in the prerequisite course)

CHE 200
Health, Safety and Asset Protection
This course is a survey of industrial and academic workplace safety as well as home safety, with a focus on increasing awareness concerning hazardous situations. The legal, economic and environmental impact of accidents is considered. Topics include requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) legislation; Worker Right-to-Know laws; individual and corporate responsibility; emergency planning and preparedness; chemical, electrical, mechanical, biological, blood-borne pathogen, radioactive material and fire related safety; materials storage, waste disposal and proper labeling; Material Safety Data Sheets; and laboratory safety in industrial and academic settings. Current and historical events related to these topics are discussed. The course includes visits to local industries to meet with professional safety officers (transportation is included) and to survey the practice of industrial hygiene.
Prerequisite: CHE 105 or permission of instructor

CHE 207
Organic Chemistry I
This course studies the chemistry of carbon and other nonmetals (including hydrogen, boron, nitrogen, phosphorous, oxygen, sulfur and the halogens) as grouped into characteristic classes of organic compounds. Topics include the structure, bonding, physical properties and reactivity of covalent and ionic molecules as well as organometallic species. Paradigms of stereochemistry, reaction mechanism, reaction kinetics and thermodynamics, and structure/ property correlation are considered. Laboratory work is devoted to the synthesis and characterization of organic compounds, the study of molecular modeling and the study of reaction kinetics and thermodynamics. Emphasis is placed on proper laboratory technique; experiment design; and laboratory data collection, reporting and interpretation. Three hours of lecture, one hour of conference group, and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: CHE 106

CHE 208
Organic Chemistry II
A continuation of Organic Chemistry I, this course utilizes the foundations established in that course for the study of the chemistry of organic molecules including their physical and chemical properties; synthesis and characteristic reactions; and identification by chemical and spectroscopic analysis. Topics are organized by functional group (an atom or group of atoms in a molecule that exhibit a characteristic set of physical and chemical properties) and are considered in the context of organic synthesis as well as biological, economic and environmental import. Spectroscopic analysis (circular dichroism, infrared, ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass) is applied to structural studies. Laboratory work is devoted to the synthesis and characterization of organic compounds. Physical characterization, spectroscopic techniques and qualitative analysis are employed in the elucidation of structure. Emphasis is placed on proper laboratory technique; experiment design; and laboratory data collection, reporting and interpretation. Three hours of lecture, one hour of conference group, and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: CHE 207 (The Department strongly recommends a C- or better in the prerequisite course)

CHE 255
Math for Chemistry and Physics
The physical applications of analytic and numerical methods are studied in such topics as differential equations, Fourier series, Laplace transforms, matrices, complex numbers and vectors. Prerequisite MAT132

CHE 321
Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy
This course emphasizes introductory quantum theory, spectroscopy and statistical thermodynamics. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: CHE 106, 208; PHY 202; MAT 132

CHE 322
Thermodynamics and Kinetics
This course discusses the 3 laws of thermodynamics and their application to equilibrium cases in solids, liquids and gases. Next we move to reaction mixtures, solubility and phase diagrams. The semester finishes with a discussion of kinetic and transport processes. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite CHE106, Corequisite PHY202

CHE 323
Instrumental Analysis
This course represents a study of the theory of modern instrumental methods of chemical analysis. Topics include various spectroscopic techniques such as infrared, ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence, atomic absorption and emission, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Mass spectrometry, liquid and gas chromatography, and various evaluative mathematical techniques also are discussed. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
Corequisite: CHE 321

CHE 324
Inorganic Chemistry
This course will survey the structures, bonding models, reactivity profiles, and applications of inorganic elements and their compounds. Representative chemistries of the main-group, transition metal and f-block elements will be covered. Modern methods of synthesis and analysis of inorganic compounds are the focus of the laboratory sessions. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: CHE 321

CHE 325
Biochemistry I
This course studies the relationships between the chemical structure and biological functions of nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and biological membranes. Experimental techniques used in the purification and/or analysis of each of these classes of macromolecules are introduced in the lecture and laboratory. These techniques include polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, column chromatography, gas chromatography and polarimetry. Spectroscopic analysis (ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence, circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance) is used extensively over the course of the year. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: CHE 208

CHE 326
Biochemistry II
This course emphasizes membrane transport, enzyme catalysis and kinetics, biochemical signaling, metabolic pathways and their regulation, electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation. The study of metabolism focuses on those pathways related to carbohydrate metabolism. The laboratory is a continuation of the first semester. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: CHE 325

CHE 411
Advanced Organic Chemistry
This seminar course explores organic chemistry using physical and mechanistic organic concepts, including molecular orbital theory. Problem solving and current literature are emphasized. The laboratory focuses on synthetic reaction development and NMR techniques. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite or corequisite: CHE 321, fourth-year students only

CHE 412
Advanced Topics in Chemistry
Selected topics with recent advances in chemistry are discussed in this seminar course. As part of the requirements, students will prepare and present papers based on recent chemical literature. Three hours lecture per week.
Prerequisite or corequisite: CHE 322 (additional prerequisites depending on the topics offered) or permission of instructor, fourth-year students only

CHE 420
Environmental Chemistry
This course is an advanced treatment of the chemistry of the environment and the chemistry of selected pollutants that are of current interest. Topics include some aspects of aquatic chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, biocycles, soils and minerals, and the effects of chemicals on the environment. The initial laboratory sessions provide a foundation for fieldwork in a project-oriented approach dealing with selected local environmental problems. Field trips to significant chemical use and processing facilities will be taken. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: CHE 322, 323; or corequisite: CHE 322, or permission of instructor

CHE 470
Advanced Topics in Chemistry Education
This course facilitates the integration of chemical principles with the education curriculum in preparation for the rigors of pedagogy. Students will thoroughly develop various educational projects that are based on the chemistry core content and are reflective of relevance to, and impact on, other fields.

chemistry-biochemistry

Pamela G. Artz, Ph.D. '87, Chair
Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Department Chair
610-921-7741
partz@albright.edu

chemistry-biochemistry

Christian S. Hamann, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry
610-921-7740
chamann@albright.edu

chemistry-biochemistry

Ian J. Rhile, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry
610-929-6757
irhile@albright.edu

chemistry-biochemistry

Nicholas A. Piro, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Chemistry
610-929-6615
npiro@albright.edu

chemistry-biochemistry

Matthew D. Sonntag, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry
610-921-7745
msonntag@albright.edu

chemistry-biochemistry

Ryan M. Ludwig, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
610-921-7722
rludwig@albright.edu

chemistry-biochemistry

Michele L. Cramer, M.S.
Instructor of Chemistry & Biochemistry
(610) 929-6633
mcramer@albright.edu

chemistry-biochemistry

Amy S. Greene, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry
610-921-7747
agreene@albright.edu

What Can I Do With a Major in…?

Chemistry
Biochemistry


Facilities & Equipment

Completely renovated and expanded, Albright’s Science Center reopened in 2011 and offers more than 78,000 square feet of state-of-the-art laboratory and classroom space. The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry is housed entirely within the facility.

Instrumentation

The department has a wealth of modern instrumentation. Available for teaching and research are:

  • FT-IR spectrometers
  • CD spectrometer
  • Raman spectrometer
  • Ultraviolet-visible and atomic absorption spectrophotometers
  • Rapid-scan UV-vis spectrophotometer
  • Spectrofluorometers
  • 300 MHz FT-NMR spectrometer
  • 400 MHz FT-NMR spectrometer
  • EC potentiostat/galvanostat
  • HPLCs
  • Variety of gas chromatographs including an autosampling model and a GC-mass spectrometer
  • Refrigerated superspeed and ultraspeed centrifuges

The department also has glove-box and solvent purification systems. A 24-processor computer cluster for molecular modeling calculations is dedicated to departmental initiatives.

Use of these resources by students begins in the first year, in CHE 105 and 106, and continues throughout the 200-, 300- and 400-level course-related and research laboratories.


Seminar Series

The Department hosts monthly seminars during the fall and spring semesters.

2018-2019 Speakers

  • Paul O’Connor, University of Augusta
  • Ryan Jorn, Villanova University
  • Christine Phillips-Piro, Franklin and Marshall
  • Nicholas Piro, Albright College

2017-2018 Speakers

  • Matthew Hartings, American University
  • Elisabeth Berry-Drago, Chemical Heritage Foundation
  • Timothy Oswald, Carpenter Technologies
  • Patricia Darrah, National Institute of Health
  • Matthew Sonntag, Albright College
  • Helene Hopfer, Pennsylvania State University
  • Kai Landskron, Lehigh University

2016-2017 Speakers

  • Stefan Bernhard, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Deborah Johnson, Baylor University
  • Mary Watson, University of Delaware
  • Suzanne Bart, Purdue University
  • Clint Stalnecker, Cornell University/Albright College
  • Christopher Cummins, MIT

2015-2016 Speakers

  • Christian Hamann, Albright College
  • Katherine Willets, Temple University
  • Paul Rablen, Swarthmore College
  • Richard Hark, Juniata College
  • Nora Radu, Dupont
  • Brenda Overkott Staehle, sdix, an OriGene company
  • Bob Bergman, UC Berkeley

2014-2015 Speakers

  • Lauren Kreno, Exxon
  • Michael Zdilla, Temple University
  • Jill Millstone, University of Pittsburgh
  • Christopher Graves, Albright College
  • Jamie Schlessman, the US Naval Academy
  • Erin Sorensen, Air Products

2013-2014 speakers

  • John Higgins, Merck Pharmaceuticals
  • Sheena Radford, University of Leeds
  • Frieda Texter, Albright College
  • Edward Fenlon, Franklin and Marshall College
  • David Schultz, The Wistar Institute
  • Larry Sneddon, University of Pennsylvania

2012-2013 speakers

  • Janet Hindler, UCLA School of Public Health
  • Ian Rhile, Albright College
  • Eric Schelter, University of Pennsylvania
  • Anastasia Christianson, Astra Zeneca Pharmaceuticals
  • Sherri Young, Muhlenberg College
  • Doug Beshore, Merck Pharmaceuticals
  • Tom Baker, University of Ottawa

Student Scholarship and Experiential Learning

Students are encouraged to broaden their experience in chemistry and biochemistry through internships and independent research. Over the last year:

  • Nearly 30 students carried out independent research projects, many of them as part of the Albright Creative Research Experience (ACRE)
  • One student presented at and another attended the National Organic Chemistry Symposium
  • Students presented to the Lehigh Valley Section of the American Chemical Society and as part of Albright’s Honors Week
  • Five students completed independent research and an honors thesis to graduate with College honors
  • Five students received departmental distinction at Commencement

Other experiential learning opportunities for Albright chemistry and biochemistry students over the past year:

  • Shadowing at Bayer and GlaxoSmithKline
  • Participation in the National Science Foundation’s Research Experience for Undergraduates at the University of Nebraska

Recent internship sites

  • Innospec, Inc.
  • Johnson & Johnson
  • Rohm & Haas
  • Pottstown Hospital
  • Wyeth
  • Cabot Corporation
  • Schenectady International
  • Legacy Brewery
  • Merck
  • Cryovac
  • Lancaster Laboratories
  • Department of Environmental Protection

 

Below are examples of recent projects by Albright chemistry and biochemistry majors funded by ACRE or by grants to the faculty. Some of this research was used to write honors theses for departmental distinction, college honors or both.

  • James Allen (faculty mentor: Nicholas Piro, Ph.D.), “Late-metal Complexes and Imido Transfer Catalysts using a Bis(guanidinyl)pyridine Ligand”
  • Zöe Gehman (faculty mentor: Nicholas Piro, Ph.D.), “Synthesis of Ligands for Holding Two Metals in Proximal but Dissimilar Binding Sites”
  • William Adams (faculty mentor: Matthew Sonntag, Ph.D.), “Development of a New Paradigm for Understanding Vibrational Spectroscopy”