Biology

Albright’s Biology Department prepares you with the education and experience needed for graduate or professional study in a wide variety of fields, as well as for post-graduate employment in industry, research, education and business. We emphasize the close relationship of biology to other scientific disciplines, such as mathematics, chemistry and physics, and also stress the importance of biology in society and within the historical liberal arts tradition.

That liberal arts focus is key. Because every scientist must communicate effectively, most biology courses at the College require lab reports, research papers and presentations. And because critical thinking will make you a better scientist, you’ll learn to evaluate original scientific literature and to understand advanced concepts in biology.

Mission statement:

The goal of the Biology Department is to foster a comprehensive knowledge of and appreciation for the many dimensions of the biological sciences. Through classroom and laboratory experiences, we seek to provide our students with a firm foundation in the ways of knowing, problem solving, and understanding the universe common to all natural sciences. We seek to teach our students the conceptual material as well as the important laboratory and field skills that will serve them well beyond Albright College. We emphasize the close relationship of biology to other scientific disciplines, such as mathematics, chemistry and physics, and also stress the importance of biology in society and within the historical liberal arts tradition.

 

Albright Biology students learn:

  1. General scientific skills, including a.) hypothesis formulation and experimental design, b.) data recording and analysis, c.) communication/dissemination (writing, oral, PowerPoint), d.) comprehension and context of experimental results, e.) information assessment, and f.) experimental manipulation.
  1. Specific lab skills, including a.) assays/instrumentation/sample processing, b.) microscopy (imaging), c.) molecular techniques, d.) dissection, e.) aseptic techniques, f.) measurements/pipetting.
  1. Specific field skills, including a.) population sampling, b.) surveying (biotic and abiotic), c.) cartography/Geographic Information Systems, d.) observation techniques, and e.) identification.
  1. Content, including a.) evolutionary theory, b.) hierarchy of biological organization, c.) physiological mechanisms/principles, d.) genetics/inheritance, e.) cellular processes, f.) micro/macrostructure, g.) ecological principles, h.) mechanisms of gene expression/regulation, i.) philosophy of nature (the environment), j.) quantitative reasoning, k.) scientific processes and history of science l.) behavior, m.) reproduction and development.

 

Students who major in biology and related areas have a  variety of professional and career paths to consider:

  • Ecologist
  • Physician
  • Biotechnologist
  • Veterinarian
  • Laboratory research technician
  • Teacher
  • Clinical laboratory scientist
  • Graduate school
  • Dentist
  • Physical therapist
  • Environmental specialist

In addition, Albright enjoys special affiliations and agreements with Penn State University (via the Early Assurance Program with Hershey Medical School) and regional schools of clinical laboratory science (for medical technology).

 

Student testimonials:

Jillian Bonitatibus ’11
Wetland wildlife intern, Hudsonia Ltd., Albany, N.Y.“My experience at Albright was one of a kind. The atmosphere was friendly, and there were always plenty of activities to get involved with on campus. I owe much of my success to the Biology faculty at Albright. The small class sizes and close, personal relationships I formed with professors helped me gain confidence and curiosity in my studies.”

Mike Goffredo ’08

Mike photoScience teacher, Sterling High School, Somerdale, N.J.“I graduated with a degree in biology and began my career as a biotechnologist in the Department of Neuroscience at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. Currently I am a high school biology teacher in New Jersey, and I must give credit where credit is due. I owe my interests, skill sets and successes in the science field to the thorough education I received from Albright’s Biology Department. Their hands-on curriculum and access to project-based learning will continue to prepare future science students for careers within the broad field of science.”
Chris Hauer ’12
Graduate student, East Stroudsburg University, East Stroudsburg, Pa.photo“Upon my first visit to campus during my senior year of high school, I immediately knew that Albright College would be my home for the next four years. I was drawn to Albright’s small classes, strong academics and welcoming community. Being a liberal arts college, Albright exposed me to a variety of disciplines and perspectives that shaped me into a well-rounded individual. Albright provided me with the opportunity to get involved both on- and off-campus through a number of clubs, academic organizations and community service projects as well. As the president of the ultimate Frisbee club and Tri Beta Biological Honor Society, I gained valuable leadership and organizational skills. In my three years as a peer orientation person (POP), I was able to share my love of Albright with incoming students in providing them with a welcoming community and assisting them with the transition to college life.“Of all of my experiences while attending Albright, I am particularly grateful for my time spent in the Biology Department. What initially struck me was the willingness of the professors to provide individualized attention. Their office doors were always open and they were happy to take time to answers any questions and review assignments. Unlike at a larger university, where research may take precedence, it was obvious that Albright’s biology professors were deeply committed to teaching and the well-being of their students. The department offers a variety of courses across the disciplines of cellular/molecular biology, evolution and ecology that provided me with a broad biological background. I was exposed to a variety of lab/field techniques and was constantly being presented with new and often challenging ideas/topics. Looking back now, I am thankful for all of the challenging moments and difficult assignments. One particular example quickly comes to mind. During my junior year, I took Geographic Information Systems (GIS), a course in which I never was really able to grasp the concepts (Dr. Mech can attest to this!). Although I struggled with it at the time, I now am proficient with GIS and use the software on a regular basis for my graduate research. Through collaborative research and lab projects, I had the opportunity to fine-tune my scientific writing, oral presentation and communication skills as well. For three years I also served as a laboratory assistant for several general biology courses. I enjoyed this experience as I was able to interact with the professors outside of the typical classroom setting while at the same time working with other students in building their own writing and laboratory skills.“I was very fortunate to have had the opportunity to collaborate with Dr. Stephen Mech on an ACRE [Albright Creative Research Experience] research project that culminated in a senior honor’s thesis. Given our similar research interests, I approached Dr. Mech during my junior year to see if he was interested in working with me. He mentioned a potential study examining the impacts of wind turbines on terrestrial small mammals, which at the time sounded like a great idea. One field season, hundreds of trapped mice, and countless mosquito bites later, we had ourselves a preliminary study. As an undergraduate, I never envisioned having the opportunity to see a study through from start to finish; from developing and implementing a thorough study design, to locating field sites, applying for funding, determining appropriate statistical analyses, before finally writing a summary report. Following the completion of my project, I also had the opportunity to present my research at several local and national conferences, allowing me to network with fellow students and researchers. I am especially grateful for my ACRE research as this experience has helped me immensely while working towards my master’s degree. Through my research, I acquired many valuable skills and an appreciation for the dedication required for a successful research project.“I really cannot say enough positive things about Albright’s Biology Department. The professors are very knowledgeable and approachable, and I have established close relationships with many of them. Through my coursework and ACRE research, I gained countless skills and valuable experiences that have greatly prepared me for graduate school.”

The biology major allows you to develop a comprehensive knowledge of, and appreciation for, the many dimensions of the biological sciences and the close relationship of biology to other scientific disciplines, such as mathematics, chemistry and physics.

Biology majors focus in general biology, biotechnology, marine and aquatic science or environmental science, and often pursue interdisciplinary or dual majors. Biochemistry and psychobiology are the most frequently chosen combinations, but students also combine biology with such other majors as history, business administration and Spanish. You also may choose a biology education program that leads to certification to teach high school biology in Pennsylvania.

Special affiliations/agreements exist between Albright College and institutions such as Penn State (Early Assurance Program with Hershey Medical School).

Students also may choose the Marine and Aquatic Science Program, a specific course sequence that offers opportunities to study a range of topics from the ecophysiology of marine organisms to wetland and watershed restoration. Field study is conducted in nearby lakes and rivers and at coastal locations including Delaware Bay, Chesapeake Bay and the Bahamas.


Requirements for the Biology Major

  • A total of 10 courses in biology, including BIO 151, 152, 203, and one 400-level course.
  • No more than two courses at the 100-level may be counted toward the area of concentration.
  • Biology majors must pass both of the introductory courses (BIO151 and 152), earning a minimum average grade of 2.0 over the two courses, or have permission of the Biology Department chair, in order to enroll in other biology courses.
  • Seniors must take the department exit exam as a graduation requirement.

In addition, one course from each of the following three groups must be taken:

  • Group I (BIO 211, 214, 312, 315, 318 and 319)
  • Group II (BIO 220, 321, 322, , 325, 327, and 329)
  • Group III (BIO 234, 235, 331, 333 and 337)
  • Within the context of these guidelines, students may freely elect any biology course or CHE 325 to meet the 10-course requirement.
  • MAT 131 (Calculus I) or BIO 200
  • CHE 207 and 208

Requirements for the Combined Major in Biology

  • A total of seven courses in biology, including BIO 151, 152, 203, and one 400-level course.
  • Biology majors must pass both of the introductory courses (BIO151 and 152), earning a minimum average grade of 2.0 over the two courses, or have permission of the Biology Department chair, in order to enroll in other biology courses.
  • Seniors must take the department exit exam as a graduation requirement.

In addition, one course from each of the following three groups must be taken:

  • Group I (BIO 211, 214, 312, 315, 318 and 319)
  • Group II (BIO 220, 321, 322, 325, 327, and 329)
  • Group III (BIO 234, 235, 331, 333 and 337)

Interdisciplinary Majors in Biology

The department participates in formal interdisciplinary majors such as psychobiology, biochemistry and environmental science. Certain biology majors, such as those anticipating entrance into cooperative forestry, environmental studies or teacher education programs, may include a geology course as a part of their program, upon approval of the department chair. Students interested in pursuing teacher certification in biology must consult the chair of the Education Department regarding specific requirements for the program.


Requirements for the Biotechnology Track

Albright offers a special track in biotechnology. This track is primarily for biology majors but may be completed by students in other majors (such as biochemistry and psychobiology) who have the prerequisites.

Requirements

  • Six of the following courses, with at least one being a 400-level seminar: BIO 321, 322, 325, 327, 329, 495, 498, CHE 325, 326

Biology students in the biotechnology track must meet the following requirements:

  • BIO 151, 152, and 203
  • The six biotechnology courses listed above
  • One course from Group I or Group III
  • MAT 131 or BIO 200
  • CHE 207 and 208

Requirements for the Marine and Aquatic Science Minor

In addition to completing the requirements for the biology or environmental science majors, students electing to complete the marine and aquatic science minor must complete the following courses:

  • BIO 211
  • BIO 312 or BIO 315
  • BIO 337
  • BIO 318

In addition to the above requirements, students are strongly encouraged to seek an experiential, off-campus experience in marine science. Consult Professor Bryce Brylawski for more information.


Independent Research

Independent research under the supervision of a member of the Biology Department is strongly encouraged. Recent independent research projects have included studies on bat ecology and echolocation, ultrastructure of insect visual receptors, the ecology of area streams, lakes and wetlands, the distribution of endangered species of mammals, and cloning of genes using recombinant DNA techniques. Such projects involve field trips to nearby ecosystems, and the use of equipment such as a Zeiss EM 109 transmission electron microscope, a digital scanning electron microscope, fluorescence microscopy, laminar flow hoods for working with sterile technique, ultramicrotomes, computer-assisted recording of physiological variables, amplification and electrophoresis of DNA and proteins, and scientific imaging equipment. A Geographic Information Systems (GIS) computer laboratory, a greenhouse, complete color darkroom facility, and faculty-student independent research space support laboratory experimentation in many courses and independent projects.


BIO 101/102
Concepts and Connections in Biology
This course is designed to enable non-science concentrators to develop an understanding and an appreciation for how science works from a biological perspective through study of select topics in natural sciences. We will examine current developments in topics such as genetics, human physiology, environmental biology and microbiology in a way that will allow students to construct a framework of key biological concepts and make connections to their lives through consideration of the applications of basic scientific principles. Students will become involved in the process of doing science, implementing lab exercises aimed at answering specific questions and developing their critical thinking skills. Evolution will be discussed as a unifying theme which helps to elevate biology from a bewildering collection of facts to a coherent study of changing life on a changing planet. General Studies Foundations Natural Science

BIO 102 is very similar in scope to BIO 101 except for an emphasis on field biology. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. General Studies Foundations Natural Science

BIO 103
Man and the Living World 
The aim of this course is to provide an introduction to important topics in the natural sciences and the relationship of humans to the natural world.  Students will become familiar with the major fields of scientific inquiry, the process of science, specific issues in science and the impact of human activity on the natural world.  General Studies Foundations Natural Science

BIO 151
General Biology I: Structure and Function
This course introduces students to cellular biology, metabolism, biochemistry, anatomy, physiology and development. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. General Studies Foundations Natural Science

BIO 152
General Biology II: Systematics, Ecology, and Evolution
An introduction to plant and animal systematics, plant physiology and ecology, this course includes a major laboratory project and report. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. General Studies Foundations Natural Science

BIO 200
Biometry
This course teaches biology students how to design an experiment in a format that leads to a statistical analysis which tests the desired hypothesis. Students learn how to recognize and apply statistical analyses most appropriate for a given data set, focusing on real examples from recent or on-going research. Emphasis is placed on some of the more commonly used statistical methods in biology in order to provide a framework for exploration of more advanced methods. This is an applied course with emphasis on using computer programs effectively. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Offered fall semester of odd years.

BIO 203
Introduction to Genetics 
An introduction to classical genetics, molecular genetics and population genetics, this course includes a major writing project designed to explore specific topics in genetics and evolution. Three hours lecture per week. Offered fall semester.

BIO 211
Ecology
This course studies the relationships between animals and plants and their natural environments. Factors shaping the distribution and abundance of organisms, populations and communities are discussed. Specific emphasis is given to factors such as competition, predation, herbivory, mutualism, physiology, climate, energy flow, and biochemical cycles that influence species adaptations and, in turn, patterns of distribution and abundance. The laboratory is designed to provide experience in the field using several techniques for monitoring both plant and animal populations, as well as environmental parameters in a variety of habitats. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Offered fall semester.
Prerequisites: BIO 151, 152

BIO 214
Botany and Plant Taxonomy
Principles of identification and classification of land plants are discussed in this course. Plant keys and digital photography are used in the field and photomicroscopy in the lab complements field work. This course includes a survey of major vascular plant families and field study of local plants and vegetation types. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Offered even years in the fall.
Prerequisite: BIO 152 or permission of the instructor

BIO 220
Evolution
This is a lecture class focusing on the role of evolution in shaping biological organisms. Major topics include natural selection, adaptation, evolution of life histories, population genetics, and the processes of speciation and macroevolution. Occasional discussions will center on reading current and seminal papers examining the important advances in evolutionary theory. Three hours lecture per week. Offered spring semester of odd years.
Prerequisites: BIO 152 and BIO 203

BIO 234
Human Anatomy & Physiology I
This is a study of the fundamentals of human anatomy and physiology, with emphasis placed on the organization of the body, cells and tissues, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, and special senses. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week. Offered spring semester of even years.

This is the first semester of a two-semester course in anatomy and physiology. It will employ an integration of morphological and physiological aspects of the human body. This course is intended to provide a strong background in human anatomy and physiology for human biology students, science majors, and students with an interest in related allied health fields.  Some basic concepts of biology and chemistry will be integrated with this course, which serve as a basis for developing specific concepts in anatomy and physiology.

BIO 235
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
This is a study of the fundamentals of human anatomy and physiology, with emphasis placed on the organization of the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week. Offered fall semester of even years.

This is the second semester of a two-semester course in anatomy and physiology. The second semester will again employ an integration of morphological and physiological aspects of the human body. This course is intended to provide a strong background in human anatomy and physiology for human biology students, science majors, and students with an interest in related allied health fields.  All students are required to prepare a research paper on a specific area of study. This investigation will allow an in-depth study of a small area of a very large discipline.
Prerequisite:  students must earn a quality grade in BIO 234 to enroll in this course

BIO/ESS 246
Conservation Biology
The study of preserving and restoring nature and ecosystem processes are covered. This course introduces students to the anthropogenic problems facing ecosystems and some of the possible solutions. Theory and application pertaining to biodiversity, species extinction, biological invasions, land management and other topics are discussed. Three hours lecture per week. Offered fall semester of even years.
Prerequisite: BIO 152, BIO 211 recommended. General Studies Connections-Global

BIO/ESS 312
Wetlands Ecology
This course covers the ecology of freshwater and saltwater wetlands systems. Linkages between the plants, animals, microbes, hydrology and chemistry of various wetland types are emphasized. Wetland delineation, functional assessment of wetlands, and wetland creation and restoration are among the topics discussed. Field trips and laboratory sessions focus on quantitative evaluations of the hydrology, soils, and plant and animal communities of various wetland types. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Offered fall semester of even years.
Prerequisite: BIO 152

BIO/ESS 315
Watershed Hydrology and Water Resources
Water is perhaps our most vital resource, yet its availability is often taken for granted. This class covers the principles of hydrologic processes that govern water distribution within a variety of landscapes. The influence of land use (e.g. rural, agricultural, urban) on water availability and quality are addressed, as well as watershed management issues and practices. In the laboratory portion of this course, field techniques are used to quantify hydrologic processes in surface waters, groundwater and wetland soils.

Water quality is also assessed within lake and river environments. Modern tools, such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS), are used to connect landscape properties to water availability and quality. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Offered fall semester of odd years.
Prerequisite: ESS 101 is recommended

BIO 318
Marine and Aquatic Science
Over 70 percent of the world is covered by water with about 97 percent of it in the oceans.  Despite this, much of these aquatic environments are not well explored or understood.  This is a problem since even though the underwater world may seem alien and distant, we are irrevocably interconnected with this ecosystem.

From fisheries to deep ocean carbon dioxide pumping humanity’s future is tied with the aquatic world.  In this course you will be introduced to the general concepts of oceanography, limnology (the study of freshwater systems), and aquatic ecology. Through a series of fieldtrips and lab exercises, you will gain firsthand experience with the tools and techniques used to discover the secrets under the waves. This course includes a trip to a marine research lab during which you will run self-designed surveys and experiments to truly become aquatic scientists. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week. Offered spring semester of odd years.
Prerequisites: BIO 211 and CHE 106

BIO 319
Vertebrate Natural History
This course is a survey of the natural history of the vertebrates. Students learn the ecology, evolution and the natural history of the major vertebrate classes including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. Laboratory focuses on taxonomic identification of vertebrates native to Pennsylvania and on various field techniques used to study and survey vertebrates. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. At least one field trip will be over a weekend. Offered spring semester of even years.
Prerequisite: BIO 152

BIO 321
Microbiology
This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of microbiology. Physiology, genetics, immunology, medical bacteriology, virology and concepts of applied microbiology are discussed. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Offered fall semester.
Prerequisites: BIO 151; 203; co-requisite CHE 207

BIO 322
Cell Biology (W)
This is an investigation into the many aspects of cell structure and function, including the importance of proteins and other macromolecules encountered within cells, as well as specific cellular organelles. Intracellular sorting, protein targeting and signal transduction are examined, along with the mechanisms involved in cancer and programmed cell death. Laboratory exercises introduce students to sterile cell culture techniques and the skills involved in establishing and manipulating plant tissue and animal cell cultures. Fluorescence and Scanning Electron Microscopy, SDS PAGE and other techniques will be learned. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Offered spring semester.
Prerequisites: BIO 151, 203 and CHE 207

BIO 325
Molecular Genetics (W)
In this course, students gain an understanding of the genetic systems of viruses, bacteria, protists, plants and animals in molecular terms. Areas of discussion include immunogenetics, transposition, gene cloning, control of gene expression and the molecular biology of developmental processes. Lab work emphasizes basic methods used for isolation, analysis and cloning of DNA molecules. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Offered spring semester.
Prerequisites: BIO 151, BIO 203, CHE 207.

BIO 327
Histology and Microtechniques
A study of tissue histology and ultrastructure, including an introduction to a number of methods for preparing material for study using light and electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, photomicroscopy, macrophotography, digital imaging and image processing. The course introduces students to research techniques and clinical procedures. It involves three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week, plus additional lab time by arrangement. Offered spring semester.
Prerequisite: BIO 151

BIO 329
Virology
Viruses are intracellular parasites that require a living cell in order to replicate themselves and produce new virus particles. Within a historical context, the field of virology is a relatively new area of scientific research with many exciting discoveries occurring on a regular basis. There have been numerous types of viruses discovered to date. They have been shown to infect virtually every form of life on earth, including, insects, plants, mammals, and even bacteria. In terms of human health and disease, there are several reasons why the study of viruses is an important undertaking. For example, some viruses can cause considerable illness but they can also be used as delivery vehicles for vaccines or as cancer therapeutics. In this class, students will be exposed to studies published in the primary literature and be instructed via lecture, student-led presentations, and class discussion. Throughout the semester, students will have the opportunity to bolster both their written and oral communication skills. Finally, the laboratory portion of the course will give students hands-on exposure to many significant and fundamental principles of virology. Three hours lecture per week. Offered in the spring semester of even years.
Prerequisites: BIO 203, CHE 207

BIO 331
Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (W)
This course emphasizes understanding the functional and comparative anatomy of the vertebrates through exploration of vertebrate structure and function from an evolutionary perspective. Protochordates, lamprey eel, shark, mudpuppy, and cat are dissected to compare the basic architectural patterns of vertebrate systems and to discover ways in which existing structural patterns are modifications of ancestral patterns. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Offered spring semester of odd years.
Prerequisite: BIO 151

BIO 333
Developmental Biology
This course emphasizes topics relevant to vertebrate development. The lecture shows continuity between classical embryological work and modern experimental biology. The laboratory is divided between classical and experimental work. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Offered fall semester.
Prerequisites: BIO 151, 203

BIO 337
Comparative Animal Physiology and Ecophysiology
This course will explore the interplay between the physiological mechanisms of organisms and the ecological responses of populations to environmental stress. Topics covered will include basic physiological mechanisms, the effect of natural and human-induced environmental change on animal physiology, the special adaptations that allow organisms to survive in a variety of aquatic habitats, and the ecological implications of physiological responses to stress and environmental change. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week. Offered spring semester of even years.
Prerequisites: BIO 151 and 152, CHE 105

BIO 398
Animal & Human Nutrition
This course is an introduction to nutrional biochemistry and physiology. Students will explore the interaction between the bioenergetics of animals and the food they consume through a series of lecture and lab activities. The course material will cover nutritional requirements of domesticated animal species (fish to swine) and humans with a focus on the growth, health, and performance ramifications of differing diet composition. Prerequisites: BIO201/151 and CHE207 (corequisite)

BIO 490
Behavioral Endocrinology Seminar (W)
Students will investigate the interactions between hormones and behavior through the study of phenomena ranging from the molecular level to the social level. Behavioral endocrinology is studied from a comparative perspective by including examples from many different kinds of animals, to illuminate the various hormonal and behavioral mechanisms that have evolved in animals to deal with common problems of reproduction and survival. Three hours lecture per week. Offered as needed.
Prerequisites: BIO 151 and CHE 208

BIO 491
Seminar on Special Topics (W)
Discussions and written assignments provide an opportunity for exploration of specific topics in depth using a seminar format. Emphasis is placed on development of communication skills and ability to read and evaluate original scientific literature. Seminar topics include such areas as cell ultrastructure, immunobiology, neurobiology and environmental issues.

BIO 493
Neuroethology: The Neural Basis of Behavior (W)
This is a seminar course designed to integrate the results of behavioral field studies and neurobiological lab work. Problems of interest for written and oral assignments include signal detection, recognition, discrimination, localization, decision- making, coordination, orientation and the control of complex acts. Further areas of interest may include the neuronal and hormonal mechanisms underlying periodic changes in behavior, as well as the ontogeny and the evolution of behavior and its mechanisms. Three hours lecture per week. Offered as needed.
Prerequisites: BIO 151 and either BIO 235 or 337

BIO 494
Mammalian Evolution
A seminar concerning the evolution of mammals.  Lectures present an overview of mammalian evolution, interspersed with student presentations based on readings from current literature in the field. Students also design, develop, and provide a written proposal of a research project addressing some aspect of mammalian evolution. Three hours of lecture per week. Offered spring semester of odd years.
Prerequisite: BIO 220 or BIO 319

BIO 495
Molecular Biology Seminar
This course explores several different aspects of molecular biology, with an emphasis on plant molecular biology, and plant genetic engineering through the use of soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The genetic components of tumor-inducing plasmids of Agrobacterium and methods to engineer this plasmid to deliver genes of interest into a plant are described. Strategies to increase and control gene expression in genetically engineered plants are outlined, along with antibody production in transgenic plants, pathogen-derived resistance, virus resistance in plants, strategies for gene isolation and phytoremediation. An overview of immunology will be presented and human gene therapy is discussed along with issues of risk assessment, genetic containment and safety. Three hours lecture per week. Offered spring semester.
Prerequisite: BIO 203

BIO 498
Immunology Seminar (W)
This course is an analysis of the vertebrate immune system, including antibody structure and function, B and T-cell function, immune response mechanisms, serology, immunogenetics and immunopathology. Written and oral assignments emphasize critical analysis and discussion of current journal articles in immunobiology. Three hours lecture per week. Offered fall semester.
Prerequisite: BIO 151 and 203

biology

Professor Karen A. Campbell, Ph.D., P. Kenneth Nase M.D. '55 Chair of Biology

Dr. Karen Campbell, Health Sciences Advisor; P. Kenneth Nase Chair in Biology

610-921-7728
kcampbell@albright.edu

biology

Bryce J. Brylawski, Ph.D

Associate Professor of Biology; Department Chair

610-929-6655
bbrylawski@albright.edu

biology

Stephen G. Mech, Ph.D.

Professor of Biology

610-921-7743
smech@albright.edu

biology

David T. Osgood, Ph.D.

Professor of Biology

610-921-7726
dosgood@albright.edu

biology

Andrew I. Samuelsen, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology

610-921-7723
asamuelsen@albright.edu

biology

Adam R. Hersperger, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biology

610-929-6617
ahersperger@albright.edu

biology

Erin Ventresca, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biology

610-921-7721
eventresca@albright.edu

biology

Alice MZ Brylawski

Biology Laboratory Manager

610-921-7742
abrylawski@albright.edu

ACES Scholarships


Facilities & Equipment

Completely renovated and expanded, Albright’s Science Center reopened in 2011 and offers more than 78,000 square feet of state-of-the-art laboratory and classroom space.

Facilities

All facilities are available for use by undergraduate biology students and include the following spaces:

  • Geographic Information Systems (G.I.S.) laboratory
  • Undergraduate research laboratory
  • Electron microscopy suite
  • Tissue preparation and histology suite (complete with ultramicrotomes)
  • Greenhouse
  • Color darkroom facility
  • Student lounge
  • Science library and lounge

Equipment

Click the photos below to view a larger version.

photo

Mammalian cell culture space

  • centrifuge
  • biological safety cabinet
  • cell incubator
photo

Ecological research space

  • digital calorimeter
  • elemental analyzer
photo

Flow cytometry workstation

photo

General research space

photo

Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)
machines and gel documentation
station

photo

Flourescence microscopes

photo

Scanning electron
microscope

photo

Greenhouse and
aquaculture facility

photo

Transmission electron
microscope

What Can I Do With a Major in
Biology