Art

When you study art at Albright College, you do so at one of the best colleges in the country for artistic students. Newsweek put Albright on that list thanks to the College’s curricular and co-curricular opportunities in the arts, national recognized faculty and excellent facilities.

The curriculum of the Art Department provides theoretical and applied study of the visual arts through studio and lecture courses. All art programs at Albright combine invaluable liberal arts studies with in-depth exploration of studio art and art history.

Our objective is to provide an integrated program of study leading to a bachelor’s degree through a  full Art major, a K-12 Art Education certification major, a Digital Studio Art major, an Arts Administration combinable major, dual majors or one of three special program minors. The minor option is perfect for students who are majoring in areas other than art or who wish to have a secondary focus in their majors.

Numerous world-class art museums in New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore are within easy commuting distance of Albright, and dramatically enhance the study of visual art and art history.

The Art major, combined Art major, and special program minors within the Art Department provide you the opportunity to combine general liberal studies with in-depth study in studio art and art history. By expanding your knowledge of art genres, visual concepts, media and artists, the Art Department heightens your awareness of and appreciation for the visual arts. We emphasize critical thinking, effective self-expression and creative problem solving. Through our curriculum, the Art Department fosters your understanding of the global role of visual arts in human society.

  • Understanding the elements and principles of design.
  • Heightening awareness of the visual arts through expansion of knowledge of art forms and artists, and their relation to society
  • Knowledge of art history and contemporary art
  • Expressive use of a broad range of media and techniques
  • Conceptual problem solving in the visual arts
  • Understanding of professional practices in studio art disciplines, art history, arts administration, and art education

Profile: The Indie Filmmaker

After graduating from Albright with a bachelor’s in Art, Steve Cossman went on to found and direct Mono No Aware; a nonprofit cinema arts organization whose annual event exhibits the work of contemporary artists who incorporate live film projections and altered light as part of a performance, sculpture or installation. In 2010 the organization established a series of analog filmmaking workshops in conjunction with the event that currently works with 200 participants a year. Steve’s first major work on film, TUSSLEMUSCLE, earned him Kodak’s Continued Excellence in Filmmaking award and has screened at many festivals and institutions internationally. In 2013, he completed residencies at MoMA PS1’s Expo 1 and the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto. He has been a visiting artist at Dartmouth, the New York Academy of Art, Yale and the Aurora Picture Show in Houston. Steve’s newest work on film, WHITE CABBAGE (2011-2013), a collaboration with Jahiliyya Fields of L.I.E.S., had its U.S. premiere with a series of new work at Anthology Film Archives in December 2013. He currently lives and works in Brooklyn as a director, curator, visual artist and member of the collective DecayNY, creating time-based works on film, video, and paper.

Profiles: The Art Teachers

In the year following her graduation from Albright with a major in Art Education, Adrienne Lastoskie was a substitute teacher at Daniel Boone High School, where she had also attended high school. She was then offered a full-time position teaching art in Maryland for the Brandywine School District.

She attributes the experiences she had as an Art Education student at Albright as the primary reason she was offered a teaching position in a location of her choice. Adrienne says the team-teaching experiences at public elementary and secondary schools as well as at the Reading Public Museum prior to student teaching gave her a unique background and competitive advantage over art education graduates from other institutions.

Adrienne also feels the challenging studio art courses at the College enabled her to develop her artistic skills and create a strong teaching portfolio. She now takes her Albright studio assignments and converts them to projects she can assign her public school students.

Angela Morin excelled as a student teacher during her placement at Boyertown High School. When her cooperating teacher had to take an extended leave of absence, Angela was offered a contract as a long-term substitute teacher because of how effective she was a student teacher. Cooperating teachers in local elementary and high schools have expressed preference in having Albright College art education students because of how well prepared they are as student teachers.

Click here for more on Art Education at Albright.

Over the last few years, Albright Art graduates have begun working in a wide variety of fields and for numerous attractive employers:

  • Architectural and design representative, Superior Products, Wilmington, DE
  • Archivist, National Park Service, San Francisco
  • Art assistant, GoggleWorks, Reading, PA
  • Art director, Special Recognition, Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ
  • Art director, MGT Design, Watchung, NJ
  • Assistant editor, photography department, InStyle, New York
  • Computer graphic designer, AT&T, Holmdel, NJ
  • Curator and studio manager, All Together Art, Shillington, PA
  • Creative director, Big Bear Promotions, Kutztown, PA
  • Director, Depersico Design, Havertown, PA
  • Designer, G. Scott Designs, Seattle, WA
  • Designer, The Lorish Company, Reading, PA
  • Founder, Moviate, Harrisburg, PA
  • Framer, Framer’s Market Gallery, Exton, PA
  • Graphic Artist, Genex Services, Inc., Plymouth, MA
  • Graphic designer, Big Bear Promotions, Kutztown, PA
  • Graphic designer, CBL Advertising, Wyomissing, PA
  • Graphics designer, Art & Color Designs, Reading, PA
  • Newspaper production graphic artist, AccuWeather, State College, PA
  • Owner, Art and Antique Dealer, Annville, PA
  • Owner/designer, White Swan Gallery, Elverson, PA
  • Painter/artist, A First Impression, Naples, FL
  • Partner, Expressions in Sculpture, Loganton, PA
  • Photographer, Joe Neil, Inc., New York
  • Photographer, Lifetouch Portraits, Norristown, PA
  • Production assistant, New York Press, New York
  • Scientific illustrator, Minutiae, Evanston, IL
  • Senior designer, The Widmeyer-Baker Group, Inc., Washington, DC
  • Senior graphic artist, CBS News, New York
  • Student coordinator, Florence International Film Festival, Florence, Italy
  • Studio assistant to pop artist John A. Chamberlain, New York
  • Teacher, Intrax International Institute, Chicago
  • Teacher, Los Angeles United School District, Los Angeles
  • Web and graphic designer, Kenobi Solutions, Freehold, NJ

The Art Department offers a curriculum that combines theory and practice, well in keeping with Albright’s emphases on the liberal arts and experiential learning. This curriculum, which comprises both studio and lecture courses, has two aims:

  • To education students who elect the Art major, combined major or minor options required for a professional degree
  • To heighten the awareness and appreciation of the visual arts through expansion of your knowledge of art forms and artists, and their relation to society

Note that a portfolio review is not required for admission into the Art Department, but can be submitted for consideration of merit scholarship when you apply.

Please see Arts Administration for information on the Combined Major and Minor in Arts Administration.

Requirements for the Studio Art Major

  • ART 101 Drawing
  • ART 103 Design
  • ART 112 Painting I
  • ART 113 Sculpture I
  • ART 114 Printmaking
  • Two Art History courses
  • Two courses from among the following:
    • ART 102 Life Drawing
    • ART 215 Filmmaking I
    • ART 216 Photography
    • ART 265 Computer Graphics
  • ART 212, 312 and 412 (Painting II, III and IV) OR ART 213, 313 and 413 (Sculpture II, III and IV)
  • ART 400 Advanced Studio Topics

One of these courses may also be used to satisfy the Foundations-Fine Arts requirement of the General Education Curriculum.


Requirements for Teacher Certification

 

Albright students seeking certification in Art Education complete requirements for a major in Art and also courses required for certification. The Art Education certification is a K-12 program.

Albright students teaching at the Reading Public MuseumArt courses

  • ART 101 Drawing
  • ART 103 Design
  • ART 104 Survey of Art History
  • 100- or 200-level Art History course
  • ART 112 Painting
  • ART 113 Sculpture I
  • ART 114 Printmaking
  • ART 212 Painting II or ART 213 Sculpture II
  • ART 265 Computer Graphics
  • ART 400 Studio Topics

Professional courses

  • EDU 214 Early Field Experience
  • EDU 202 Theories & Practices
  • EDU 230 Communication Skills for Teachers
  • EDU 314 Field Experience II
  • EDU 347 ELL Strategies for the Adolescent
  • EDU 350 Educational Technology
  • EDU 440 Teacher as Researcher: Data-Driven Instruction
  • ART/EDU 337 Teaching Arts in the Elementary School
  • ART/EDU 338 Teaching Arts in the Secondary School
  • SPE 340 Inclusive Practice
  • SPE 341 Adolescents with Special Needs
  • Professional semester
    • EDU 403 Professional Semester
    • EDU 411 Elementary Art Student Teaching
    • EDU 412 Secondary Art Student TEaching
  • Courses required for Pennsylvania certification
    • English (2 units)
      • Literature
      • ENG 102 Composition II
      • Mathematics (2 units)
      • PSY 100 General Psychology
      • PSY 230 Human Development

Combined Major in Studio Art

 

Studio ArtRequirements

  • ART 101 Drawing
  • ART 103 Design
  • One of the following:
    • ART 104 Survey of Art History (preferred)
    • ART 105 Art History I
    • ART 106 Art History II
    • ART 107 Art History III
  • ART 112 Painting I
  • ART 113 Sculpture II
  • ART 212 Painting II or ART 213 Sculpture II
  • ART 400 Advanced Studio Topics

One of these courses may also be used to satisfy the Foundations-Fine Arts requirement of the General Education Curriculum.

 


Interdisciplinary Major in Digital Studio Arts

 

Requirements

  • ART 101 Drawing
  • ART 103 Design
  • ART 113 Sculpture
  • ART 216 Photography or ART 112 Painting I
  • ART 256 Modern Art and Design Concepts
  • ART 265 Computer Graphics
  • ART 400 Studio Topics (Painting, Sculpture or Digital Studio)
  • DIG 265 Digital Literacy
  • SYN 352 Aesthetic Rebels in Film and Art (formerly IDS252)
  • Three courses from:
    • DIG 201 Video I
    • DIG 270 Digital Illustration and Design
    • DIG 315 Web Design or DIG283 Visual Design for the Web
    • ART 212 Painting II or ART 213 Sculpture II
  • DIG 420 Senior Seminar

One of the ART courses may also be used to satisfy the Foundations-Fine Arts requirement of the General Education Curriculum.


Minors in Art History, Film/Video, Photography, Painting and Sculpture

 

Requirements for Minor in Art History

  • Two 100-level Art History courses
  • Two 200-level Art History courses
  • One 300-level Art History research course

Requirements for Minor in Film/Video

  • One 100-level Art History course
  • One introductory studio course
  • ART 215 and 315 (Filmmaking I and II) or Digital Video I and II
  • One 400-level studio topics course

Requirements for Minor in Photography

  • One Art History course
  • One introductory studio course
  • ART 216 and 316 (Photography I and II)
  • One 400-level studio topics course

Requirements for Minor in Painting

  • One 100 level Art History Course
  • Design (ART 103)
  • Painting I (ART 112)
  • Painting II ( ART 212)
  • Studio Topics-Painting (ART 400)

Requirements for Minor in Sculpture

  • One 100 level Art History Course
  • Design (ART 103)
  • Sculpture I (ART 113)
  • Sculpture II ( ART 212)
  • Studio Topics-Sculpture (ART 400)

Studio Courses

ART 101
Drawing
This is a sequence of experiences and discussions intended to expand the student’s awareness of the visual world and of the special language of visual communication through drawing. The use of materials such as a brush and ink, pencil, and collage is stressed. General Studies Foundations-Fine Arts

ART 102
Life Drawing I
Students will draw from a variety of sources including the live model and biological specimens as fundamental experiences for developing hand-eye coordination. Various media and techniques are explored.

ART 103
Design I
Design I is an introductory course dealing with the elements and principles involved with the visual organization of two- and three-dimensional space. Emphasis is placed on developing understanding and sensitivity to the components of works of art and creative approaches to composition and uses of color. Developing the ability to articulately critique the work of others as well as one’s own artwork is also emphasized. The course is designed to develop perceptual ability and increased application of creative thinking to the world around us and everyday experience. We will explore design possibilities through the use of observation, speculation and imagination. Increased understanding of use of computer programs in the innovative creation of design is also a primary objective. Conceptual explorations will be made regularly in a journal, which will then selectively be further developed in various media. Throughout the course, assignments will be presented that are involved with the creative employment of the principles of design: repetition, balance, emphasis, movement, rhythm, contrast, pattern and unity. This course will be team-taught.  General Studies Foundations-Fine Arts

ART 112
Painting I
This is a series of exercises and discussions exploring color relationships and acrylic painting practices. The principles of two-dimensional composition and design are emphasized. General Studies Foundations-Fine Arts

ART 113
Sculpture I
This is an exploration of the expressive and structural possibilities of such materials as wood, plaster and clay. These and other materials are used as a means of studying three-dimensional form. General Studies Foundations-Fine Arts

ART 114
Printmaking I
This course consists of a sequence of exercises and discussions intended to expand the student’s awareness of visual expression through multiple graphic images. Various printing processes are introduced including intaglio and relief. General Studies Foundations-Fine Arts

ART 204
Life Drawing II
This advanced study of drawing investigates sources including the model and anatomy. A wide range of materials are explored. Prerequisites: ART 101, ART 102 or permission of department.

ART 212
Painting II
Students will continue their study of the principles of painting and design, and are encouraged to develop their own personal idiom while working in oil, acrylic and mixed media. Prerequisite: ART 112 or permission of department.

ART 213
Sculpture II
This is a further exploration of three-dimensional materials and the possibilities they present for creative visual statements. Students are encouraged to develop their own personal idiom while working in wood, plaster, metal, stone and ceramic. Prerequisite: ART 113 or permission of department.

ART 214
Printmaking II
Students explore the methods and materials of intaglio printmaking, and will develop greater understanding of technical and creative issues in black and white and color etching. Prerequisite: ART 114 or permission of department.

ART 215
Video and Filmmaking I
This course introduces the fundamentals of the art of filmmaking. It is a hands-on studio course in which students write, direct, shoot and edit their own films. These production activities are supplemented with film theory and history presented through lectures, screenings, readings and student reports. The emphasis of the course is on film as a fine arts medium of personal expression. Studio fee.

ART 216
Photography
This is an introduction to still photography; basic experience in the use of the camera, developing, printing and enlarging. The emphasis is on composition, light and shadow, textures, and experimental photography as a means of visual expression. Studio fee.

ART 220
Watercolor Painting Global Imagery
An investigation into the historical evolution of style and techniques in watercolor painting with the intent of establishing a broad base of understanding of diverse cultural values as reflected in visual art throughout history. Stress is placed on the understanding and use of watercolor throughout the history of art for solving various problems of representation and abstraction.  A main objective of the course is to increase understanding of the role of imagery in communicating and representing universal concepts and ideas through the history of art and civilization. Class lectures, discussions, research and studio assignments will include the role of painting in the history of civilization and the diverse ways in which it reflects and affects culture. GENERAL STUDIES CONNECTIONS GLOBAL

ART 265
Computer Graphics Art and Design
Computer Graphics is a combined studio/lecture course providing instruction in the use of industry-standard digital media tools. Students learn from the perspective of an artist and designer the essentials of digital still image creation, graphic design and digital animation. This course not only provides students with a strong technical foundation, but also introduces students to the concepts intrinsic to art and design in the digital age.  General Studies Foundations-Fine Arts

ART 312
Painting III
This is an advanced-level study of methods and materials, as well as aesthetic and conceptual issues, as they apply to painting. Prerequisite: ART 212 or permission of department.

ART 313
Sculpture III
This is an advanced-level exploration of methods and materials, as well as aesthetic and conceptual issues, as they apply to sculpture. Prerequisite: ART 213 or permission of department.

ART 314
Printmaking III
Students continue their in-depth study of methods in intaglio, relief and/or serigraphy. Prerequisite: ART 214 or permission of department.

ART 315
Video and Filmmaking II
This course continues to explore the possibilities of moving images in the service of creative expression. While continuing to work with the S-8mm medium, students are introduced to 16mm film and camcorder (digital) video production. Students also have the opportunity to work with film processing, rephotography and digital non-linear editing. Studio fee. Prerequisite: ART 215 or permission of department.

ART 316
Photography II
In this course, students concentrate in a particular branch of photography, including work in toning, solarization, kodalith, color and digital photography. Studio fee. Prerequisite: ART 216 or permission of department.

ART 400
Studio Topics
This is an individual study program, arranged in consultation with the instructor. Students will develop a cohesive body of work based upon an intensive exploration of thematic context, materials and techniques. This course emphasizes individual concept development, personal direction, originality and problem solving.

ART 412
Painting IV
This is an individual study program, arranged in consultation with the instructor, for continued development of a personal approach to painting and creative decision-making. Prerequisite: ART 312 or permission of department.

ART 413
Sculpture IV
This is an individual study program, arranged in consultation with the instructor, for continued development of a personal approach to sculpture and creative decision-making. Prerequisite: ART 313 or permission of department.


 

Art History Courses

ART 104
Survey of Art History
A survey of ancient to contemporary western art. This course includes sections on Western Art, Chinese Art, Japanese and Korean Art, and African Art. The course is designed for future teachers of art as well as students interested in an overview of art history.  General Studies Foundations-Fine Arts

ART 105
Art History I: Ancient through Medieval
A survey starting with humans’ earliest known artistic expression and continuing through the material culture of the Mediterranean basin into the earlier periods of Western European painting, sculpture and architecture: Early Christian, Byzantine, Caroligian and Ottonian, Romanesque and Gothic. Along with a history of artistic form and its practitioners, this course provides an introduction to the analysis of visual works of art. A field trip is required.

ART 106
Art History II: The Renaissance to Early 19th Century
A survey of painting, sculpture and architecture beginning with Giotto and the early Italian Renaissance, through the Northern Renaissance, Mannerism, the Italian Baroque, Northern Baroque, Rococo to the French Revolution and David. A field trip is required.

ART 107
Art History III: Survey of Modern Art
A survey of painting and sculpture from the mid-19th century to the present. Avant-garde developments in Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art and Postmodernism are emphasized. A field trip is required. General Studies Foundations-Fine Arts

ART 135
Dada and Surrealism
This will be an aesthetic, political, historical and cultural study of one of the most influential art movements of the twentieth century. Manifestos, poems, fiction, performances, theater, music, films, photography, fashion, are but some of the numerous dimensions of the movement we will explore. With it’s major precursors in New York and European Dada and it’s flowering in Paris in the 1920’s it quickly spread throughout Europe, North and South America. For students who want to move beyond the notion of surreal as a synonym for all things weird and whose idea of Surrealist art is limited to Salvador Dali’s melting clocks, this course could be a very enlightening and enjoyable experience. (The course will include a field trip to the Philadelphia Museum of Art to see their important Dada and Surrealist holdings, and the world’s best collection of works by Marcel Duchamp.)  General Studies Foundations-Fine Arts

ART 244
Gender in the Visual Arts
This course provides an overview of the relationship between gender and the visual arts in Western civilization from prehistory to the present. We will look at art patronage and academic institutions, and the other factors which impacted the lives of women artists.  The narrative of gender in contemporary culture will be examined, to question questions in aesthetic and the evolution of the global art marketplace. General Studies Connections-Humanities

ART 253
Art of the Renaissance
This course examines the painting, sculpture and architecture of the Italian Renaissance, Northern Europe and Spain, beginning with Cimabue and the Limbourg Brothers and concluding with Mannerism and El Greco. Discussions will focus on the interpretation of iconography, formal issues and historical context. A field trip is required.

ART 254
The Italian and Northern Baroque
Students will investigate the art and architecture of the Mediterranean and Northern Europe from the mid-16th through the 17th centuries. Discussions will focus on artists such as Caravaggio, Carraci, Rubens, Rembrandt, Velasquez, and Bernini, who are placed within the context of major trends and ideas of the time. A field trip is required.

ART 255
Art of the 18th and 19th Centuries
This is an in-depth analysis of the painting and sculpture of the neoclassical, romantic and realist movements as practiced in England, France, Germany and Spain. Beginning with J.L. David and ending with Gustave Courbet, an approach that places the work within its contemporary intellectual, social and political context will be utilized. A field trip is required.

ART 256
Modern Art and Design Concepts in the 20th Century
This course is designed to give the student an understanding of how the world looks and why.  The centerpiece of the course is the German Bauhaus [1918-1933], the most influential design school in the twentieth-century.  Modern architecture, which was developed in Europe and in the Chicago School, determined the “look” of the twentieth century and contemporary life.  With this modern architecture came new ideas in fashion, graphics, interior design, landscape architecture, and industrial design. GENERAL STUDIES CONNECTIONS

ART 300
Topics in Art History
In this course, students will study a topic or area of interest in art history. The course may focus on an area such as museum management or be a specialized course on, for example, Impressionism or Dutch Baroque art. The course offers the student the close intellectual scrutiny that accompanies scholarly readings not always tenable in a survey course.

ART 357
Issues in American Art from 1940 to the Present
Developments in painting, sculpture and related forms from abstract expressionism through postmodernism of the 1980s are examined in detail. Considerable attention is given to issues of mass culture. A field trip is required.

ART 358
The History of Photography
This course explores the early history of photography from its beginnings in the early decades of the 19th century until the present. Considerable attention is given to the question of how photography has impacted the aesthetic, intellectual, and spiritual values of modern civilization, a question that has preoccupied thinkers from Walter Benjamin to Susan Sontag.


 

Art Education Courses

ART/EDU 337
Teaching Art in the Elementary School
This course engages art education candidates in developing an understanding of the philosophy and principles of art education in the elementary school curriculum. Each student will work with a variety of public school art materials as a basis for teaching, understanding and evaluating children’s artwork. This course is a pre-student teaching experience in which each student prepares lessons for N-7 instruction. Activities include field trips, observations and classroom presentations.

ART/EDU 338
Teaching Art in the Secondary School
This course engages art education candidates in the investigation of the concepts and values of art theory and practice as related to the secondary curriculum. Students study classroom problems and procedure in various teaching situations. Emphasis is placed upon application, observation and evaluation of teaching as related to the adolescent in the secondary school. This course is a pre-student teaching experience in which each student prepares lessons for secondary art instruction. Activities include field trips, observations and classroom presentations.


Arts Administration Courses

ARA 220
Introduction to Arts Administration
This course provides an introduction to how arts organizations, including those in the theater, dance, music and the visual arts, engage artists and audiences and how they are governed. Leadership of individual organizations as well as the larger public policy and community issues surrounding the arts are examined. The course also includes overviews of historical contexts, economic conditions, organizational cultures and financial systems relative to the arts.

ARA 270
Gallery Management and Exhibition Planning
This course will introduce students to all aspects of exhibition and gallery management. Using the Freedman Gallery as a resource, students will gain hands on experience focusing on the organization of an exhibition from start to finish. Particular attention will be paid to the concept of production schedules, writing didactic materials, and installation. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of educational related programming and collections management. Students will gain practical experience working with the permanent collection, developing skills related to database management, storage and loans. Readings for the course will include critical texts surrounding the discourse of exhibition and curatorial strategies. Assignments throughout the semester will focus on sharpening critical writing and thinking skills by analyzing a selection of articles and exhibition reviews. The final project will include an exhibition culled from the Gallery’s permanent collection to be presented as part of the Gallery’s regular schedule. Through research, writing and analysis of exhibition case studies, students will learn about the broader context of how exhibitions play a role in the dialogue of the contemporary art world. Prerequisites: At least one art history course and ARA 220, or the permission of the instructor.

ARA 390
Project Management for Arts Administrators
Project management is the discipline of planning, organizing, securing and managing resources to achieve a specific goal. By nature, projects usually have a well-defined beginning and end, and are constrained by time, funding and the expected outcomes (deliverables). The temporary nature of project management as well as the personal and humanistic approach to creating artistic products often conflict with professional business operations. In practice, project management in the arts often requires the development of a distinct set of skills. This course will enhance and test students’ knowledge of budgeting, marketing, human resources, planning/time-management, and project implementation and evaluation within the framework of the creative process. Half of the course will be based on readings and research (texts and online) discussed in class and in written assignments, and the other portion will be a project-based lab, with the first part containing an individual assignment and the latter half focused on a group project that introduces concepts of leadership and team-building skills. An additional lab of 1 to 1.5 hours per week will be arranged in consultation with the instructor. (ARA 220 as pre-requisite or sophomore standing.)

ARA 490
Arts Administrators Seminar
Building on the concepts and skills learned in ARA 220 and ARA 390 (Project Management), students will apply their knowledge to help design a season of events for the Center for the Arts. As a group, students will work with faculty, staff and peers in related student organizations to produce workflow schedules, gather information, create a comprehensive timetable and marketing plan, write press releases, prepare assessment tools, and finalize budgets. Individually, students will work on resumes, portfolios, interview skills, and career development exercises, including periodic journal reviews

art

Kristen T. Woodward, MFA

Professor of Art, teaching painting and printmaking

610-921-7710
kwoodward@albright.edu

art

Brian N. Glaze, MFA

Assistant Professor of Art

610-921-7715
bglaze@albright.edu

art

Richard A. Hamwi, Ph.D.

Professor of Art

610-921-7774
rhamwi@albright.edu

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Gary L. Adelstein, MFA

Associate Professor of English and Art

610-921-7713
gadelstein@albright.edu

art

Newton A. Perrin, Ph.D.

Professor of Art History and German

610) 921-7688
nperrin@albright.edu

art

David Tanner, MPA

Director, Center for the Arts

(610) 921-7619
dtanner@albright.edu

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Beth Krumholz

Curator of Education, Center for the Arts

(610) 921-7777
bkrumholz@albright.edu

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Matthew Garrison, MFA

Associate Professor of Art and Digital Media; Department Chair


mgarrison@albright.edu

Facilities and Equipment

In 1990, with a lead gift by philanthropist Doris Chanin Freedman and a major grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, Albright launched a $6.5 million building project under the direction of architect Adele Santos, who collaborated with sculptor Mary Miss to create the central plaza and amphitheater that form the heart of our Center for the Arts (CFA).

Center for the Arts

Around this central artwork, Santos designed a south wing to house the Art Department, with studios for drawing, painting, printmaking, ceramics and woodworking. The north wing houses the Freedman Gallery, with a small outdoor sculpture court separating it from the northeast wing, which is home to the Music Department and its studios, practice rooms and Roop Hall performance space. The costume and fashion sewing lab connects this floor via a breezeway to the Campus Center. On the second floor of this wing sit the Wachovia Theatre, box office and mezzanine, where special events and receptions are held. Klein Hall, which serves as a space for class lectures and is home to the International Film Series, directly connects the CFA to the Campus Center on this level.

CFA’s studio classrooms provide more than ample space for you to explore the media of your choice. These spaces were designed with exposure to northern light in order to provide maximum natural light every day.

You are encouraged to make use of the facilities outside of class time and have access to them at all times of day. Art Department facilities support activities in drawing, two- and three-dimensional design, painting, sculpture, printmaking, ceramics, analog and digital photography, printmaking and digital media.

What Can I Do With a Major in
ART

Student Scholarship

Art students have supplemented classroom and studio learning with experiential education in recent years:

  • Students in the Albright Visual Arts Organization (AVAO) organized workshops with art faculty to construct bones from clay and plaster to be exhibited as part of One Million Bones, a national project calling attention to genocide throughout the world. AVAO’s fabricated bones were displayed at Penn State Berks’s Freyberger Gallery and the Goggleworks Center for the Arts in Reading before making their way to the National Mall in Washington, DC.
  • Exchanges and exhibitions at the National Small Works Exhibition at Elon College in North Carolina, the Fleisher Art Memorial in Philadelphia, the 6x6x6 exhibit and fundraiser at the Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, and the Troika exchange of small works at Dragon Hall, England
  • Local exhibits at the Goggleworks Center for the Arts, the Abraham Lincoln-A Wyndham Hotel, and the Humane Society of Berks County
  • Internships at the Berks Filmmakers Media Center, the Reading Public Museum and the Goggleworks Center for the Arts
  • Numerous Albright Creative Research Experience (ACRE) projects
  • Community programming for younger audiences through the department’s educational curator, Beth Krumholz