The Experience | Albright College

The Experience

View the Experience Events Calendar Here


Frequently Asked Questions About “The Experience”

A full-time day student is required to complete sixteen credits before the end of the sophomore year.
Transfers who come in as sophomores are required to complete eight credits by the end of the sophomore year.
Transfers who come in as juniors are not required to complete the experience (but we encourage you to attend events anyway!)

You must arrive at the event before it begins and get a card from an experience monitor. Experience monitors WILL NOT hand out cards after the event has begun. After the event is finished, you hand the filled-out card back to the monitor. Monitors will NOT accept cards before the end of the event.

You will NOT get credit for an event if you arrive after it begins or leave before it ends.

You will only receive experience for seeing a show or performance once, even if it is the next year.

Students MAY NOT get Experience Credit for events that they participate in (Domino Players cannot get credit for a performance in which they act, direct, or work, orchestra members cannot get credit for events in which they play, etc.).

Students who complete the events by the end of their sophomore year will receive a “Q” on their transcript.

Students who do NOT complete their Experience requirement by the end of the sophomore year will receive an “I” (incomplete) on their transcript.

Students who complete the Experience requirements by the end of their junior year will have the “I” replaced by a “Q.”

Students who do NOT complete the Experience by the end of the junior year will have the “I” replaced by an “F.” The “F” will not be calculated into the GPA, but will remain permanently on the student’s record.

Students who complete the Experience events by the end of their senior year will have Experience listed a second time (as if they took the course a second time) with a “Q.”

Students who do not complete the Experience events will not graduate.

Your advisor can access a list on IQ Web with the number of events you have completed.
Kelly Tanger, the administrative assistant in the CFA, also has a list of how many and which events you have attended.

Students are rarely (almost never) given exemptions from the experience. If for some reason you feel you must try, you must make a written request by email to the chair of the Experience Committee (John Pankratz, jpankratz@albright.edu) explaining and justifying your request. The email must also be copied to your advisor or it will not be considered. Then, your letter will be distributed to the Experience Committee and a decision will be made. You will be notified of the decision of the committee within two weeks.


In order to become a monitor you must have completed the required number of experience events, then talk to the CFA secretary. It is a paid position.

Calendar of Events

*For tickets/prices, call the Box Office at 610-921-7547

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December


January 2018

Joan Linder, Operation Sunshine
Jan. 23 – April 8, Freedman Gallery (MG & Foyer)

Artist Lecture, Jan. 25, 4-5 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall
Opening Reception, Jan. 25, 5-7 p.m.

The exhibition highlights Linder’s most recent body of work, which explores toxic waste sites in Buffalo, Tonawanda, and Niagara Falls, New York. Linder’s initial work focused on the Love Cana neighborhood along the Niagara River. During the 1940s, the Hooker Company dumped over 20,000 tons of toxic waste on this 36-square block locale. In 1978, the ill-health of its residents came to light, and subsequently, families were forced out of their homes and the community was demolished. Following a Superfund cleanup, what remains visible is a wasteland of grass-covered mounds surrounded by a chain-link fence. In the exhibition, the drawings expand to include radioactive waste sites in western New York that were a result of the Manhattan Project activity. Linder uses drawing to consider how history can get buried: as artifacts and chemicals in the ground, and as documents in the archive. The act of drawing becomes a way to slow down and pay attention anew to the damage and history that has become hidden in plain sight.


Date Safe: Can I Kiss you?
Jan. 29
6 p.m., Bollman Center
Featuring Mike Dormitz

More students taking these actions would result in you having greater support to create continual, positive changes in your school and community. You would have students wanting to get involved in efforts to impact your community. A larger number of survivors would be aware of their options and the occurrence of sexual assault would be reduced.


February 2018

6th Annual Albright Improv Festival*
Feb. 3
Join us for a day of laughter and learning with improvisational comedy troupes from Yocum Institute, West Chester University, and Drexel University, joined by Albright Improv, along with a very special headliner. The afternoon’s roundtable, “Serious Comedy,” will focus on how comedy can compel us to confront matters of great importance.

Workshop, 12-4 p.m., Roop Hall, Green Room
Mini-Conference, 4-5:30 p.m., Roop Hall
Showcase*, 7 p.m., Roop Hall, $5


Facul-Tea: Spanish 101 for the Liberal Arts: The Making of an Open-Source Textbook
Feb. 8
4 p.m., Library Group Study Room A/B

Lennie Amores, Ph.D. will present on the open source Spanish textbook she and Professor Janice Rodriguez are currently drafting. The textbook project seeks to bridge the liberal arts foundation of Albright college with the practical communication skills and interdisciplinary transcultural knowledge students gain from learning foreign languages. Refreshments will be provided. Presented by the Gingrich Library.


The Unique Role of Analytical Chemistry in the Specialty Steel Industry Lecture
Feb. 8
4:30 p.m., Science 256

Take a walk through a local steel mill, as seen through the eyes of a chemist. The ancient question of “Will I ever need to use this in the real world?” will be answered “yes” for the entire freshman chemistry text book.


Bill Murray Knows Coffee
Feb. 15
4 p.m., Klein Hall

William Murray ’83, President and CEO of the National Coffee Association, will speak about his experience as a lobbyist for the coffee industry .

Since graduating from Albright in 1983, William “Bill” Murray has worked for Hollywood, the Public Relations Profession and the Coffee Industry. Murray is President and CEO of the National Coffee Association, the industry’s chief trade group. Previously, Murray was Chief Executive Officer of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA), the world’s largest professional society for public relations practitioners and Executive Vice President and Co-Chief Operating Officer at the Motion Picture Association of America. He earned an M.B.A. from The Thunderbird School of Global Management and a B.A. in Business & English from Albright College. He earned the Certified Association Executive designation from the American Society of Association Executives and was named the Outstanding Association Executive of the Year by the New York Society of Association Executives.


Facul-Tea: New Century, New Forums: Jean-Philippe Toussaint’s Literary Screens
Feb. 15
4 p.m., Library Group Study Room A/B

What happens to literature in an age of screens? Arcana Albright, Ph.D.’s presentation considers how critically acclaimed novelist Jean-Philippe Toussaint answers this question by examining a variety of his literary projects that engage head-on the intersection between literature and the screen. From book to screen adaptations to a theatrical production featuring enormous screened video, not to mention a novel entitled La Télévision and a multimedia exhibit at the Louvre LIVRE/LOUVRE, the place of the book in a universe of visual projections onto screens constitutes a core preoccupation of Toussaint’s work. As he explores non-literary forms, Toussaint demonstrates that literature not only can survive but can thrive in an age of screens. Indeed, Toussaint’s work showcases the screen’s ability to illuminate and extend the literary experience. Refreshments will be provided. Presented by the Gingrich Library.


V-Day Albright College (The Vagina Monologues)
Feb. 16-17, 7 p.m.; Feb. 18, 2 p.m., Roop Hall

The Vagina Monologues is an all-female casted show featuring monologues by Eve Ensler, the V-Day movement pioneer. It includes pieces surrounding topics of sexual and domestic violence as well as sexual intelligence. An artistic approach to activism that drives the reality of this issue into our own communities.


WXAC Battle of the Bands
Feb. 17
7 p.m., Memorial Chapel

Attention Student Musicians! My name is Avery Foster and I am the Program Director at WXAC 91.3 FM Albright College Radio, based in Reading. WXAC is hosting our first annual Battle of the Bands on Feb. 17 and we are extending an invitation to students from Albright College, Alvernia University, Kutztown University, Pennsylvania State University in Berks and Reading Area Community College! By auditioning, you will have a chance to compete for prizes. The top three artists will win a chance to perform live on-air at WXAC and have their content played and promoted through our web pages and over our air waves! To apply, you will need to complete an application form providing your personal and artist information. Since we want to hear the real you, originals are preferred. Applications will be accepted until Feb. 10! If you are interested in performing, please complete the application form and send it to: WXAC@albright.edu. We can’t wait to hear your sound!


Tropical Ecology of Costa Rica
Feb. 19
7 p.m., Science 256

A report from Río de Sueños. Students who participated in the Tropical Field Ecology course at Albright’s Río de Sueños field study property in Costa Rica will report on research conducted in January 2018.


Facul-Tea: Opening the Secret Files: New Perspectives on British Views of Indian Language and Politics
Feb. 22
4 p.m., Library Group Study Room A/B

Shreeyash Palshikar, Ph.D. will discuss the results of a summer 2017 research trip to the United Kingdom that included reading declassified documents related to India’s language policies in Britain’s National Archives. It will introduce language politics in India, discuss colonial views and post-colonial views, and identify how these views changed over time. Refreshments will be provided. Presented by the Gingrich Library.


Almost, Maine by John Cariani*
Feb. 22-24, 8 p.m.; Feb. 25, 2 p.m., Wachovia Theatre, directed by Matt Fotis
One cold, clear Friday night in the middle of winter, while the northern lights hover in the sky above, Almost’s residents find themselves falling in and out of love in the strangest ways. Knees are bruised. Hearts are broken. Love is lost, found, and confounded. And life for the people of Almost, Maine will never be the same.

Talkback and Reception, Feb. 22, follows show
Albright Improv Show, Feb. 23, follows show, Roop Hall


March 2018

American Landscape, a Choral Concert
March 3
7:30 p.m., Memorial Chapel

The Albright Angels, Concert Choir, Mane Men and Women’s


Facul-Tea: Clergy and Contraception: Religious Responses to Contraception in the Post-War United States
March 8
4 p.m., Library Group Study Room A/B

Samira Mehta, Ph.D. will talk about how the clergy viewed contraception in the Post-War United States. Refreshments will be provided. Presented by the Gingrich Library.


This event has been postponed due to impending inclement weather.

The 14th Annual Richard J. Yashek Memorial Lecture
March 21
7:30 p.m., Memorial Chapel

Not Your Father’s Antisemitism
Lecture by Michael Berenbaum, Ph.D., American Jewish University
Why is antisemitism in the 21st century different from Nazi antisemitism or traditional antisemitism? Is the American Jewish community fighting the wrong battles? Join us and learn why those who refight the last war often lose the next one.

Michael Berenbaum, Ph.D. is the director of the Sigi Ziering Institute: Exploring the Ethical and Religious Implications of the Holocaust and a professor of Jewish Studies at American Jewish University in Los Angeles. He served as project director overseeing the creation of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, was the first director of its Research Institute, and was president and CEO of The Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation. The author and editor of 20 books, he was also managing editor of the second edition of the Encyclopedia Judaica, a 22-volume body of work that won the Dartmouth Medal of the American Library Association as the best reference work of the year.

Berenbaum just completed work on an exhibition at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati that opened to coincide with the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. He is also developing the content for interactive programs and an expanded website for the Holocaust Memorial Miami Beach and leading the development of an interactive online Holocaust and Jewish Identity curriculum with the Coalition for Initiatives in Jewish Education and the USC Shoah Foundation Institute.

His work in film includes serving as executive producer, historical advisor, consultant, interviewee and producer to more than 20 films, including three Academy Award winners. Free and Open to the Public.


LUNAFEST Film Festival
March 22
4 p.m., Center for the Arts

The American Association of University Women, Reading, PA Branch presents LUNAFEST, a festival of award winning short films by, for, and about women. Supporting women filmmakers through Chicken and Egg Pictures and educational projects and activities for Reading’s AAUW, this fundraising festival is dedicated to promoting awareness about women’s issues, highlighting women filmmakers, and bringing women together in community spirit.

4 p.m., Student Screening: A special college students’ screening (screening only, no reception) is available for FREE in the CFA, Room 235. Tickets can be reserved here by choosing the 4 p.m. screening time or call 610-777-0900 for more information.
6 p.m., Evening Reception: Open to the community in the CFA, Mezzanine. Wine and hors d’oeuvres will be served. 7 p.m., Screening and Discussion of the nine short films in the Klein Lecture Hall.

Only 135 tickets are available, $25 in advance or $30 at the door (if available). You may secure your tickets in advance by purchasing them here until March 18. For further information, call 610-777-0900.

AAUW promotes equity for women and girls through advocacy, education and research. Support us by supporting an entertaining and empowering LUNAFEST.


April 2018

Beyond Fat Diets: Evidence-based Nutrition for Optimal Health
April 4
4-5:30 p.m, McMillan Student Center, South Lounge

Dr. Kyle Meyer will present the latest research and his clinical experience related to dietary recommendations, focusing on the distinction between evidence-based dietary recommendations and the numerous diet and weight loss plans advertised in popular.


Life After Albright
April 4
6 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall

Learn about life after Albright with the Lion Diplomats. A panel of Alumni Board Association members will answer student’s questions and light refreshments will be served.


Take Back the Night
April 4
7 p.m., Memorial Chapel

Worldwide, one in three women, and one in six men, experience some form of sexual violence or intimate partner violence. Take Back the Night is an international event designed to help bring an end to sexual, relationship, and domestic violence. This event is open everyone!


Understanding Heteronormativity and The LGBTQ Experience
April 5
4 p.m., Center for the Arts, Room 235

Beth Kiester, Ph.D. will be talking about the concept of heteronormativity followed by a twenty-minute film called Imagine A World Where Being “Gay” Is the Norm & Being “Straight” Would Be the Minority. Afterward, the LGBT Center of Reading will present a workshop which highlights the struggles, realities and possibilities for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community.


Facul-Tea: Thinking Environmentally and Medically
April 5
4 p.m., Library Group Study Room A/B

Carlos Dimas, Ph.D. will be talking about a case study of a cholera epidemic in Argentina. He will give an in-depth analysis of how medicine and the environment intersect. Refreshments will be provided. Presented by the Gingrich Library.


Fashion Alumni Panel
April 6
7 p.m., Science Lecture Hall (Science 256)


Music Industry Interview 
April 6
8 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall


6th Annual Music Business Forum
April 7
10 a.m.-4 p.m., Roessner Hall

The sixth annual Music Business Forum will feature presentations with current music industry professionals, including: TBD. Lunch provided. FREE for Albright students and prospective students with advance registration required, $10 all others. Questions? Contact amerlino@albright.edu.


Lion Enterprises Spring Concert Series
April 8
7 p.m., Memorial Chapel

The Lion Enterprises’ Spring Concert Series includes three shows from April to May. Each event features a new line-up of Lion Enterprises artists and a special guest performer.


Robert Macaire Goes to Rio: Caricature and Frenchness in 19th-Century Brazil
April 9
4 p.m., Center for the Arts, Room 235

The author proposes to talk about stereotypes and how these impacted visions of cultures in both Brazil and France.


Alum Caleb Smith, In Person, With His Latest Short Videos & Live Performance of Scores
April 11
7:30-10 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall

Highly regarded photographer, musician and film and video artist will present his latest experimental and music videos accompanied by a live music performance.


Facul-Tea: For the Bible Tells Me So: Understanding the Impact of Religious Beliefs and State Policy Attitudes Towards LGBTQ Individuals
April 12
4 p.m., Library Group Study Room A/B

Elizabeth Kiester, Ph.D. will be talking about ACRE research she conducted with a former student. What is the role of religious beliefs in shaping attitudes towards LGBTQ individuals? Additionally, what effect might policies have in mitigating or enhancing that effect? Their research suggests that religious beliefs and pro-equality policies act as a mechanism for what we believe and who we know which in turn have an effect on attitude formation. Refreshments will be provided. Presented by the Gingrich Library.


The Liar by David Ives adapted from the comedy by Pierre Corneille*
April 12-14, 8 p.m.; April 15, 2 p.m.
Wachovia Theatre, directed by Julia Matthews.

“All the world’s a lie, and all the men and women merely liars,” so says Dorante, the charming young lawyer who can’t open his mouth without telling another whopper. Dorante quickly sets his romantic sights on the beautiful Clarice, or maybe it’s her best friend Lucrece. Which one is which? And which one is secretly engaged to his best friend? Falsehoods fly in this sparkling French comedy by Corneille, newly adapted by David Ives.

Talkback and Reception, April 12, follows show
Albright Improv Show, April 13, follows show, Roop Hall


African American Society Presents Living In Color: The Spring Fashion Show
April 13
8-10 p.m., McMillan Student Center

Hosted by the African American Society (AAS), students will showcase their talents through fashion, poetry, singing, rapping and more. Three alumni will also be participating in the fashion show. Tickets $5.


Sunday Sinfonia at Albright College
April 15
3 p.m., Memorial Chapel


Mathematics Colloquium
April 16
4-5 p.m., Center for Computing and Mathematics, Room 100C

Suppose you need to connect each building on campus to the IT Center with its own underground internet cable. This problem can be modeled as a graph-theoretic problem: vertices represent buildings, edges represent allowable trench routes between buildings, and edge weights are the Euclidean distances between buildings. In this talk, we will review related spanning tree problems, the Cable-Trench and some solution approaches. Suitable for students and faculty alike.


The Paris Agreement, Climate Change, and the Psychology of Climate Deniers
April 17
4-5:30 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall

The World Affairs Club 2018 Spring Lecture Series. Irene Langran, Ph.D., David Osgood, Ph.D., Barton Thompson, Ph.D., and Brian Jennings, Ph.D. discuss the global implications of the Paris Agreement and explore the respective social and political consequences of disregarding climate change.


Privilege Walk
April 17
5:30-7 p.m., Science Field

Privilege is a leading topic in modern political discussion. Privilege reflects social, psychological, and philosophical ideas within communities. As college students, it is important for us to understand what privilege is, why it occurs, and how it can affect our perspective, daily experience, and peer influence. The event will explore privilege through discussion, poetry and include a chance to win $100.


Making Reproductive Choice Sacred: The Clergy Consultation Service on Abortion, 1965-1975
April 19
4-5:30 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall

This talk explores the crucial role of liberal religious activists in shaping abortion access before Roe v Wade. Made up of liberal Protestant ministers, Jewish rabbis and dissident Catholic nuns and priests, the Clergy Consultation Service organized in three countries to lobby for the repeal of abortion laws, challenge anti-abortion activists and assist women obtain safe abortions. Despite facing arrest and prosecution, the CCS created a domestic and international medical referral network that shepherded hundreds of thousands of women to reliable abortionists within the United States and to providers in Canada, England, Mexico, Japan and Puerto Rico.


How to ‘SUCCEED’: Navigating the Path from Undergraduate to Graduate School for Clinical Psychology
April 20
4 p.m., CFA 235

John Vasko, ’15 will be sharing with Albright Students about the impact of his research at the University of Maryland. This research examines aspects of adolescent and adult ADHD, substance use of both alcohol and marijuana, and the development of treatment. His research experiences will also be salient to students who are conducting their own research and looking to pursue careers in the academic sciences.


Big Cat Jazz Concert
April 20
7:30 p.m., Memorial Chapel


Symphonic Band Concert
April 21
7:30 p.m., Memorial Chapel


Thinking About Thinking: Modeling Reality
April 23
7:30-8:30 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall

Today, effective citizenship and effective governance are both rooted in science. Yet increasingly, science-deniers have come to govern our country, many of whom are continuously re-elected by poorly informed voters. At the same time, the science-related, global issues that confront us could not be more urgent. This course is intended to engage students in quantitative thinking, foster a more scientifically engaged society, and one able to grasp and evaluate discourse on a full range of critical global issues. One recalls the memorable words of Margaret Mead, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”


The Implications of Cryptocurrencies and Blockchain in the World of Business and Economics
April 24
4-5:30 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall

The World Affairs Club 2018 Spring Lecture Series. Professor Rohde, Saboori, Ph.D., and Cryptocurrency mining expert, George Barry Wolfe, will be discussing the impact of shared Cryptocurrencies, the use of Blockchain in various industries, how Cryptocurrencies are created by everyday people around the world, and the economic implications on world economies.


International Students Association Festival
April 24
6-8 p.m., McMillan Student Center, South Lounge

A celebration of different cultures will be represented by international students at Albright.


Little Voices/ Pequea as Voces: Displacement of Children in Colombia
April 24
6:30-8:15 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall

This hybrid documentary explores real life stories and experiences of displaced children in Colombia. The stories are illustrated and animated using the original drawings by the children, who provide a unique point of view of the armed conflict in the country.


The Bristlecone Project
April 25
4-6 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall

This emotional and informative 30-minute documentary is an inspiring introduction about men and their individual stories of healing after sexual abuse. The Bristlecone Project has grown since its creation in 2013. Following the presentation, one of the film participants will talk about his experiences as a survivor. A panel of community professionals will discuss their roles within the community and provide an opportunity for Q&A.


Facult-Tea: Connecting Community and Economic Conditions in Reading, PA
April 26
4-5 p.m., Gingrich Library

When do we feel like we belong? How much does it vary based on our economic conditions, the composition of our family or our similarity to our neighbors? In 2017, Dr. Wilder conducted a survey of residents of the City of Reading to answer some of these questions and to compare the results to a similar survey conducted earlier. Using the results of an individual level household survey and current economic conditions at a neighborhood level, Dr. Wilder explores the sense of ownership and belonging in the City of Reading. In addition, the survey helps to identify the factors that influence satisfaction as well as the greatest challenges.


Darwins Orchids: Queerness, Natural Law, and the Diversity of Desire
April 26
4-5:30 p.m., Memorial Chapel 102

Donovan Schaefer (University of Pennsylvania) will present a talk based on his current research. Darwinian biology is often held up as a heteronormative framework. Natural law theologians who are pro-Darwin see it as a way to glorify straightness, cis-ness, and hetero-patriarchal norms. But a closer examination of Darwinian thought-both within Darwins research and subsequent developments in evolutionary theory-shows that Darwin can be coupled with contemporary queer and trans theory. A Darwinian framework can lead to a model that recognizes the sexual complexity of life and the overarching diversity of desire


Albright College Dance Team – Spring Showcase
April 28
8-10 p.m., Wachovia Theatre

The Albright College Dance Team will be showcasing tap, jazz, contemporary, lyrical, and praise styles of dance in their performances. Trained in a variety of dancing styles, together, we are a group of women with a shared passion for Dance.


Honors Thesis Presentations
April 30
4 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall

Students will present the results of their senior honors research in a series of short talks.


Green and Growing: Student Projects in Theatre
April 30
7:30 p.m., Wachovia Theatre


May 2018

Honors Thesis Presentations
May 1
4 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall

Students will present the results of their senior honors research in a series of short talks.


Honors Thesis Presentations
May 2
4 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall

Students will present the results of their senior honors research in a series of short talks.


The 14th Annual Richard J. Yashek Memorial Lecture
May 2
7:30 p.m., Memorial Chapel

Not Your Father’s Antisemitism
Lecture by Michael Berenbaum, Ph.D., American Jewish University
Why is antisemitism in the 21st century different from Nazi antisemitism or traditional antisemitism? Is the American Jewish community fighting the wrong battles? Join us and learn why those who refight the last war often lose the next one.

Michael Berenbaum, Ph.D. is the director of the Sigi Ziering Institute: Exploring the Ethical and Religious Implications of the Holocaust and a professor of Jewish Studies at American Jewish University in Los Angeles. He served as project director overseeing the creation of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, was the first director of its Research Institute, and was president and CEO of The Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation. The author and editor of 20 books, he was also managing editor of the second edition of the Encyclopedia Judaica, a 22-volume body of work that won the Dartmouth Medal of the American Library Association as the best reference work of the year.

Berenbaum just completed work on an exhibition at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati that opened to coincide with the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. He is also developing the content for interactive programs and an expanded website for the Holocaust Memorial Miami Beach and leading the development of an interactive online Holocaust and Jewish Identity curriculum with the Coalition for Initiatives in Jewish Education and the USC Shoah Foundation Institute.

His work in film includes serving as executive producer, historical advisor, consultant, interviewee and producer to more than 20 films, including three Academy Award winners. Free and Open to the Public.


Emerging Voices from Domino Players Studio
May 2
7:30 p.m., Wachovia Theatre

Scripts and project proposals due, February 23
Auditions, March 14 and other dates TBD


Yves Saint Laurent, a Fashion Icon
May 3
7 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall

A screening of Jalil Lespert’s movie Yves Saint Laurent, followed by a short discussion.


Albright’s Annual Fashion Showcase*
May 5
$5/$10 students advance/door, $10/$15 adult advance/door, $25 VIP advance only/reserved seating and private reception

Exhibition, 4-5:30 p.m., Roop Hall
Runway Show, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Wachovia Theatre
VIP Reception, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Freedman Gallery


Celebrate Spring, a Choral Concert
May 5
7:30 p.m., Memorial Chapel

Say farewell to the graduating seniors in Albright Angels, Concert Choir, Mane Men and Women’s Chorale in their final performance of the season.


Lion Enterprises Spring Concert Series
May 6
7 p.m., Center for the Arts, Mary Miss Amphitheater

Astro Lasso will be the guest performer, returning for an Albright performance, following sets performed by our talented student musicians.