Summer Session I | Albright College

Summer Session I

Course NumberTitleInstructorTime
BUS345AFinancial ManagementNewfeld, Daria10:30-12:50 MTWTh
CHE102AOLScience of Food & CookingRhile, IanONLINE
ECO105AOLPrinciples of EconomicsGhosh, SomaONLINE
ECO207AStatistical Analysis for Eco/BusSaboori, Farhad8-10:20 MTWTh
ECO336AIntermediate MacroeconomicsSaboori, Farhad10:30-12:50 MTWTh
ENG135AIntroduction to LiteratureSpeese, James10:30-12:50 MTWTh
ENG236AOLWriting about World CinemaTartaglia, JerryONLINE
FAS283AFabrics & Fashion TextilesJackson, Andre10:30-12:50 MTWTh
MAT110AElementary StatisticsSchaeffer, Andrea10:30-12:50 MTWTh
MAT131AOLCalculus INawrocki, DavidONLINE
MUS122AOLMusic & World CulturesMerlino, AnthonyONLINE
MUS284AOLPopular Music & Digital CultureD’Errico, MichaelONLINE
REL231AOLCults & New Religious MovementsBrown, CharlesONLINE
SOC231AOLCults & New Religious MovementsBrown, CharlesONLINE
SOC383AUnderstanding IdentitiesGuo, Yu9-11:20 MTWTh

Course Descriptions

BUS345 Financial Management – An introduction to the concepts and techniques of financial management including elementary security valuation, time value of money, risk analysis, capital budgeting, capital structure and cost of capital, financial planning and forecasting, and financial statement analysis. Prerequisites: ACC101 Financial & ECO207 Statistics.

CHE102 Science of Food & Cooking – This course is designed to use food and cooking as a means to learn biochemistry. After exploring some basic biochemistry, explore various food types, such as fruits, vegetables, beer, wine, bread, baked goods, chocolates, candy, meat, milk, cheese, eggs and custards. Students will implement experiments with food aimed at exploring questions and testing hypotheses to develop their critical thinking skills. Students will need access to a kitchen with some basic cooking equipment and will purchase food for the laboratory component. ONLINE. GENERAL STUDIES FOUNDATIONS-NATURAL SCIENCE.

ECO105 Principles of Economics – An introduction to the methodology of economics and basic principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics. The primary objective of this course is to provide a foundation for further study in economics. It also serves as an introduction to basic economics as a social science. ONLINE.GENERAL STUDIES FOUNDATIONS-SOCIAL SCIENCE.

ECO207 Statistical Analysis for Economics and Business – An introduction to the concepts, theories, and methods of statistical problem-solving in business and economics. Topics include frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability and sampling theory, probability distributions, elementary hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, correlation, and regression. GENERAL STUDIES FOUNDATIONS–QUANTITATIVE REASONING.

ECO336 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis – An examination of the modern history of determination of the level and rate of growth of income, employment, output, and general price level. Alternative fiscal and monetary policies to facilitate full employment and stable economic growth.. Prerequisite: ECO105 Economic Principles.

ENG135A Introduction to Literature – Students will be exposed to a variety literary genres and authors of various backgrounds, focusing on American literature. Class will discuss these texts and learn styles of deconstruction and analysis to pull personal and cultural meaning from texts. GENERAL STUDIES FOUNDATIONS: HUMANITIES.

ENG236AOL Writing about World Cinema – Writing About World Cinema is an online four week writing course that satisfies a Global Humanities Connections General Education requirement. The course is designed to explore the films of various nations, and analyze them by understanding the historic and cultural contexts in which they were produced. Students are expected to devote at least 15 hours per week to the work of this online course. It is not possible to complete the work on week ends only. Mid-week participation is required. The course is open to Albright students who have completed their Foundations requirement. ONLINE. GENERAL STUDIES CONNECTIONS-GLOBAL-HUMANITIES.

FAS283 Fabrics & Fashion TextilesThe journey of a single garment is never simple. Take for example the humble T-shirt: cotton is grown, spun, dyed, knitted, and sewn. Each step combining multiple processes; each step building upon the last. Through hands on experience, students will get an introduction to each of these processes including other variations to the chain of production. Students will leave this course with a basic understanding of how various fibers become the yarns, fabrics and consumer goods they use every day. Projects encourage individuals to expand upon each lesson, building upon their individual skills to produce an end product that fits within their personal work/portfolio.

MAT110 Elementary Statistics – This course gives students a general overview of modern statistics. Topics include: organization of data; probability and probability distributions; measures of central tendency and variability; normal distributions; sampling; hypothesis testing; correlation and regression. A TI-89 graphing calculator is highly recommended. FOUNDATIONS-QUANTITATIVE REASONING.

MAT131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I – Fundamental concepts of functions of one variable: limits, continuity, and differentiability. Derivative applications in curve stretching, related rates, and maxima-minima problems. Introduction to indefinite and definite integration including the fundamental theorem. This is the first course taken by students in a math or math-related curriculum. ONLINE. GENERAL STUDIES FOUNDATIONS–QUANTITATIVE REASONING.

MUS122 Music and World CulturesA grand tour of the musical styles of the world’s large culture regions: sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and the Islamic world, South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Pacific, East Asia, Amerindia, and the Western world. Student will be introduced to basic musical concepts with emphasis on understanding musical instrument types and their characteristic sounds. Students will listen to recordings of ancient and medieval folk music types of traditional rural communities (work songs, harvest songs, lullabies); the art music of the aristocratic courts (including the South Asian raga and the Western symphony); and the modern musical styles emerging in the contemporary urban and electronic age, from Chinese rock to African rap. Film viewings will help students link the diverse musical sounds with social contexts. Each semester we try to arrange for the visit of a world musician to personally introduce their style to the class. ONLINE. GENERAL STUDIES FOUNDATIONS-FINE ARTS

MUS284 Popular Music & Digital CultureThis course explores the interrelationships between commercial popular music and digital culture in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Students will explore issues such as gender and identity in popular music, the remix as cultural practice, the politics of digital sampling, hip-hop and dance music in Post-Ferguson America, the relationship between music and interactive media such as video games, and globalization in the age of cloud computing. By combining critical listening skills with original research and writing, students will engage core debates within popular music and digital media studies. ONLINE. GENERAL STUDIES CONNECTIONS-GLOBAL-HUMANITIES.

REL231 Cults/New Religious MovementsThis course provides an opportunity for students to develop a general sociological understanding and perspective with which to evaluate, interpret and understand new religious movements, also known as “cults” Topics investigated include the historical emergence of new religious movements, recruitment strategies and the use of violence. Several case studies are used throughout the course including: The People’s Temple, The Branch Davidians, Aum Shinrikyo, Montana Freemen, Solar Temple, Heaven’s Gate and Chen Tao. ONLINE. GENERAL STUDIES CONNECTIONS-HUMANITIES.

SOC231 Cults/New Religious MovementsThis course provides an opportunity for students to develop a general sociological understanding and perspective with which to evaluate, interpret and understand new religious movements, also known as “cults” Topics investigated include the historical emergence of new religious movements, recruitment strategies and the use of violence. Several case studies are used throughout the course including: The People’s Temple, The Branch Davidians, Aum Shinrikyo, Montana Freemen, Solar Temple, Heaven’s Gate and Chen Tao. ONLINE. GENERAL STUDIES CONNECTIONS.

SOC383 Understanding IdentitiesIn recent years, intersectionality has become a “buzzword” in both social sciences and humanities. It is often used to describe the fact that people are located at the intersections of multiple social categories (rather than just one category), such as race, gender, social class, sexuality, ability/disability, nationality, etc. This challenges the view that people are either totally privileged or totally oppressed in society and explores the possibility that people can be privileged in some aspects but disadvantaged in others in social life. Intersectionality also speaks to the necessity of considering how multiple disadvantages may work together to shape some people’s life chances instead of prioritizing just one category while ignoring others (i.e., the competition of comparing which social group is MORE oppressed). This course explores this relative new field of intersectionality, tracing its history back to Black Feminism and discussing its various applications today — especially in terms of understanding our own identities. GENERAL STUDIES CONNECTIONS.