SRI Dual Enrollment | Albright College
Science Research Institute in-person this year - small student groups with strict social-distancing and masking required.

SRI Dual Enrollment

Highly motivated high school juniors and seniors may apply to earn college credit at Albright College, while still enrolled in high school. Courses count towards an Albright bachelor’s degree or can be transferred to other colleges or universities.

How does it work?

Albright College offers Dual Enrollment courses – covering a variety of topics – each fall, spring and summer session. Enrolled students spend part of each week day morning taking part in classes on Albright’s college campus, and earning college credit.

Each Dual Enrollment course costs $500 and offers one unit per semester (the equivalent of 3.5 credits at most institutions). Students completing five courses (5 units/17.5 credits) over their junior and senior years of high school will have the equivalent of a full semester complete before beginning college.

SRI Dual Enrollment program

Focusing on innovation and entrepreneurship, this innovative research program offers opportunities for high school juniors and seniors to immediately, and concretely, apply Dual Enrollment collegiate studies and earn even more college credit, by pairing a course of their choice with a concurrent Science Research Institute course (SPI 101).

SRI Dual Enrollment credits:

One Dual Enrollment course (1 unit)
SPI 101 – introductory research course (.25 unit)
= 1.25 total units per semester (the equivalent of 5 credits at most institutions)

SRI Dual Enrollment cost:

One Dual Enrollment course ($500)
SPI 101 – introductory research course ($125)
= $625 total per semester

Application deadlines:

  • Jan. 1 for Spring Dual Enrollment. (Program acceptances will be announced by Jan. 15.)
  • June 1 for Summer Dual Enrollment. (Program acceptances will be announced by June 15.)
  • Aug. 1 for Fall Dual Enrollment. (Program acceptances will be announced by Aug. 15.)


















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Choosing Courses

Accepted students may choose a 100-level college course, offered on a space-available basis. Your first choice may not be available.

Students accepted into the SRI Dual Enrollment program will also be automatically registered for SRI 101 – Introductory Research.

Learn about transferability of Albright College courses here.

ART 265
Computer Graphics, Art and Design
Computer Graphics is a combined studio/lecture course providing instruction in the use of industry-standard digital media tools. Students learn from the perspective of an artist and designer the essentials of digital still image creation, graphic design and digital animation. This course not only provides students with a strong technical foundation, but also introduces students to the concepts intrinsic to art and design in the digital age. General Studies Foundations-Fine Arts.BIO 101
Concepts and Connections in Biology
This course is designed to enable non-science concentrators to develop an understanding and an appreciation for how science works from a biological perspective through study of select topics in natural sciences. We will examine current developments in topics such as genetics, human physiology, environmental biology and microbiology in a way that will allow students to construct a framework of key biological concepts and make connections to their lives through consideration of the applications of basic scientific principles. Students will become involved in the process of doing science, implementing lab exercises aimed at answering specific questions and developing their critical thinking skills. Evolution will be discussed as a unifying theme which helps to elevate biology from a bewildering collection of facts to a coherent study of changing life on a changing planet. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. General Studies Natural Science Foundations.

BIO 151
General Biology I: Structure and Function
This course introduces students to cellular biology, metabolism, biochemistry, anatomy, physiology and development. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered every semester. General Studies Natural Science Foundations.

BIO 152
General Biology II: Systematics, Ecology and Evolution
An introduction to plant and animal systematics, plant physiology and ecology, this course includes a major laboratory project and report. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered every semester. General Studies Natural Science Foundations.

BUS 155
Personal Finance
This course will provide the student with an introduction to various concepts associated with finance as well as learning practical applications. The course is geared toward practical knowledge and application of personal finance that is necessary for decision making in everyday life. Topic coverage includes financial decision making, basic financial planning (budgeting), tax issues, managing savings and other liquid accounts, buying a house, the use of credit (debt), insurance, managing investments and saving for retirement are included in the course. General Studies Foundations-Quantitative.

ECO 105
Principles of Economics
An introduction to the methodology of economics and basic principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics. This course provides a foundation for further study in economics. It also serves as an introduction to basic economics as a social science.

CHE 100
Chemistry and Society
This course is an introduction to the Natural Sciences through the study of relevant scientific issues set in their political, economic, social, international and ethical context. The course content enables students to learn the specific natural science of chemistry in the framework of their own lives and significant issues facing science and the world. The chemical content is presented as needed to provide a basis for the understanding of these topics. The laboratory consists of an introduction to scientific methods and obserbation essential to the study of the natural sciences. Observations are based on data rooted in a material explanation of the natural world. Analysis of data includes an inductive reasoning approach. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. This course satisfies the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement.

CHE 105
General Chemistry I
This course is an intensive study of the main concepts of chemistry, and covers qualitative and quantitative descriptions of matter and reactivity. The description of matter includes the atomic and subatomic scale (atomic structure, bonding, geometry and intermolecular forces) and the macroscopic scale (phases of matter and solutions). Reactivity topics include basic patterns of reactivity, reaction stoichiometry and thermochemistry. Both conceptual learning and quantitative problem solving are emphasized. The laboratory program consists of an introduction to scientific methods and observation specifically involving inorganic synthesis and qualitative analysis. Observations are based on data rooted in a material explanation of the natural world. Analysis of data includes an inductive reasoning approach. Four hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. This course satisfies the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement typically for students planning to major in chemistry, biochemistry, biology or a related field. Facility with algebra is assumed.

CHE 106
General Chemistry II
This course is a continuation of CHE 105 covering kinetics, equilibrium, spontaneity and an introduction to inorganic chemistry. Within these topics, acid-base (proton transfer equilibrium) chemistry, electrochemistry (electron transfer equilibrium) and solubility (solid-ion equilibrium) are discussed. The introduction to inorganic chemistry includes descriptive chemistry of metals and nonmetals, coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry and environmental chemistry. The laboratory program focuses on quantitative analysis with an introduction to the use of chemical instrumentation. Facility with algebra is assumed. Four hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHE 105 (The Department strongly recommends a C- or better in the prerequisite course).

ECO 100
The Economics of Social Issues and Public Policy
This course introduces and reinforces economic principles through the study and discussion of current controversies and policy issues. The course is strongly based on the use of economic terminology and tools. It is intended as an introduction to the study of economics and as a means of reinforcing economic modeling and critical thinking skills. The course also provides an overview and discussion of many important policy issues. General studies social science credit.

ECO 105
Principles of Economics
An introduction to the methodology of economics and basic principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics. This course provides a foundation for further study in economics. It also serves as an introduction to basic economics as a social science.

ENG 101
Composition
A study of the fundamentals of effective written expression, with emphasis on grammar, syntax, and usage, and on the development of thesis-directed essays that make use of evidence and argumentation to validate their theses. Coupled with attention to the fundamentals of research, including quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing effectively and accurately and citing sources correctly, using any of a number of forms for citations and works cited. Required of all first-year students with the exception of students who evince superior facility in written expression.

ENG 102
Writing About Texts
Continued attention to grammar, syntax, usage, and formal research methods is coupled with study of thesis-directed writing that incorporates the work of other writers for the development of the students’ own writing. Required of all students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of or exemption from ENG 101.

FRE 101
Elementary French I
This course is designed for those who have never studied or who have had only minimal exposure to French. It covers basic grammatical concepts and vocabulary related to daily life and limited aspects of the cultures of the French-speaking world, and emphasizes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students who successfully complete this course are able to speak and write in very simple ways about familiar and immediate topics and understand the gist of written and spoken French materials on familiar topics. Conducted in French, except for clarification of grammar and culture. Four class meetings per week.

FRE 102
Elementary French II
Continuation of FRE 101. This course expands the students’ ability to understand and produce written and spoken French. It emphasizes accuracy in pronunciation and familiar grammatical constructions and acquisition of new structures that enable students to handle more complex tasks. French 102 emphasizes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, and continues the exploration of cultures of the French-speaking world through a variety of materials. Conducted in French, except for clarification of grammar and culture. Four class meetings per week. Prerequisite: FRE 101

FRE 201
Intermediate French I
This course refines the skills that students acquired in elementary French by developing precision and nuance in topics and grammar previously studied. It enhances the students’ ability to handle communicative tasks necessary for survival in the target culture. Students gain a more acute awareness of cultures of the French-speaking world through the study of a variety of authentic texts, including literary fragments, journalistic pieces, film and other media. French 201 emphasizes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Conducted in French, except for clarification of grammar and culture. Four class meetings per week. Prerequisite: French 102, three or four years of high school French, or permission of instructor

FRE 202
Intermediate French II
Continuation of FRE 201. This course explores more complex communicative strategies, grammar and vocabulary necessary for advanced study of the language. It focuses on such tasks as narrating in all tenses, advising/persuading and giving a supported opinion. It continues in-depth analysis of the cultures of the French-speaking world through a variety of materials and emphasizes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Conducted in French, except for clarification of grammar and culture. Four class meetings per week. Prerequisite: FRE 201

HIS 101
Ancient Mediterranean World
This course is meant to familiarize students with several of the ancient civilizations that contributed to the formation of the Western and Middle Eastern worlds. It centers primarily on the societies that developed around the Mediterranean Sea, including the Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman. The course includes not just political developments such as the rise and fall of major empires and their social hierarchies, but also the emergence and decline of religious cultures; the status of women and children; and the ways in which political, cultural, and social phenomena of the ancient world still affect lives today. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

HIS 122
Medieval and Early Modern Civilization
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and complications of pre-modern European history. The span of this class is ambitious: it begins with the fall of the Roman Empire, and it concludes at the cusp of the French Revolution. Because we are dealing with centuries of history, and a plurality of people and cultures, this course is really designed to present students with an overview of the era, and to stress the foundations of Western Civilization. Thematically, this class deals with topics such as the rise and splintering of the Christian faith, the emergence of political institutions in various nation-states, the changing constructs of sex and gender norms, the development of global capitalism, and the evolution of secularism in literature and in art. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

HIS 135
World History I: Foundations of World Civilizations
This course will introduce students to the general characteristics of the major civilizations and the epochs of world history to 1500. It will combine a general overview of global developments and a concern with the common elements in the human experience with specific study of the development of major distinct traditions in Southwest Asia, the Mediterranean, India, China, Europe, Japan, Africa, and the Americas. Students will be encouraged to see events from a global rather than narrowly Eurocentric perspective. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

HIS 136
World History II: The Making of the Modern World
Survey of modern world history, focusing on the integration of the Old and New Worlds through the establishment of European colonial and trading empires, the global effects of the Scientific, Political (U.S. and France), and Industrial Revolutions, the impact of nineteenth-century European imperialism, the effects of the world wars on the global balance of power and decolonization, and the aftermath of the Cold War and the contemporary era of “globalization.” Stresses the interactions of world culture zones in the exchange of goods, peoples, and ideas rather than pursuing a Eurocentric perspective. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

HIS 137
20th Century World History
This course deals with the main developments of the twentieth century: the legacies of the nineteenth century, the world wars, decolonization and the Cold War, world social and cultural changes, and globalization. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

HIS 151
United States 1585-1800: The Origins of American Civilization
The new societies that emerged in North America in the 17th and 18th centuries were the products of a much broader process of migration, cultural encounter, conquest and exchange that began to accelerate in the Atlantic world after the Columbian voyages of the 1490s. As it turned out, some of these societies also formed the origins of the United States as a nation and the seeds of many of the institutions and impulses of American life. This course explores the colonial and revolutionary periods from both these perspectives. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

HIS 152
The United States in the Nineteenth Century
The 19th century in the United States, as in many other regions of the world, was a period of fundamental and astonishingly rapid social and economic change. A capitalist world system, in which the American economy played an increasingly important role, implicated more and more people in a planetary web of market relations. Over the same period the process of industrialization altered the material bases of production and consumption with profound implications for the nature of work, the structure of families and people’s perceptions of time. In every aspect of human endeavor- politics, business, science, literature, the arts, sexuality and gender relations, child rearing – individuals, groups, and institutions struggled to adapt and to make sense of these changes. Our task in this course is to pose and to begin to answer a series of questions about these changes and these responses. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

HIS 153
United States History Since 1865
The major themes of 20th century America are examined – political and economic changes, technological advances, new social patterns, the impact of sports and leisure, and problems of injustice and social breakdown. The continuity of these developments is contrasted with changes that were forced upon the U.S. by specific events – stock market collapse, depression, war, ’60s trauma and Reagan conservatism. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

HIS 202
History of Race and Ethnicity in the United States
Race and ethnicity have played a significant, complicated, and more often than not, a misunderstood role in US history. This course will survey the ways that race and ethnicity have been constructed and understood by Americans from the colonial era to the present, focusing on the way that class, gender, culture and politics, as well as biology, have defined race and the way that race and ethnicity have supported ideologies that have been used to both empower and subordinate the denizens of the United States. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

HIS 204
US Women’s History
In this course, we will explore the ways in which society shapes our notion of what it means to be a “woman” and how women design and create their own lives. Our objective is to develop an understanding of women’s experiences in such areas as family, relationships, work and politics. Throughout the course, we will explore how women of different races, classes, ethnicities and sexual orientations raise questions about their experiences and come into conflict with and make alliances with other women. The course will begin with an examination of pre-contact indigenous women and end with women in the present day. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

LAT 101
Elementary Latin I
The fundamentals of Latin syntax and vocabulary are developed through the study of original Latin sentences and passages. Some study of linguistics, English derivations and cognates, and brief readings from selected Latin authors are included.

LAT 102
Elementary Latin II
Continuation of 101

MAT 110
Elementary Statistics
This course gives students a general overview of modern statistics. Topics include: organization of data; probability and probability distributions; measures of central tendency and variability; normal distributions; sampling; hypothesis testing; correlation and regression.

MAT 131
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
This course involves fundamental concepts of functions of one variable. Topics include: limits, continuity, differentiation, derivative applications, curve sketching, related rates, and maxima-minima problems. Introduction to indefinite and definite integration including the fundamental theorems, and numerical approximation techniques are also covered.

MAT 132
Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
This course is a continuation of MAT 131. Topics include transcendental functions, applications of integration, including volume, surface area, arc length, and work. Also covered are integration techniques, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, sequences and series, and Taylor’s theorem.
Prerequisite: MAT 131 with a C- or better.

PHI 101
Philosophy
This course introduces central historical and contemporary debates in philosophy, including the nature of persons, self-identity, and free will, the foundations of knowledge, and the basis of moral and aesthetic judgments. Why are you who you are? How do you know what you know? Are you living a good life? Find out. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

PHI 102
Philosophy and Fiction
This course is an introduction to philosophical problems through an examination of works of fiction. The types of fiction chosen may include science fiction, existentialism or other genres. Questions covered may include the nature of the mind and self, the possibility of free will, the sources and reliability of knowledge, artificial intelligence, and moral problems. Films will supplement readings. Does not count towards philosophy concentration.

PHI 120
Truth and Beauty
What makes you who you are? How did you choose the goals you are currently pursuing? What do you most value, and why are those things so important to you? Throughout this course, we will try to develop your answers to these three questions. Along the way, we will evaluate both historically significant and contemporary responses to these issues. Our primary goal, though, is to develop your own critical, constructive and creative answers to these questions. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

PHI 130
Individual and Society
The course investigates certain historical, social, and ethical dimensions of what is called “social philosophy.” We start with some historical explorations of the emergence and/or the relevance of the “individual” in ancient Greece, ancient China and classical Islam. Afterward, the class will approach different theories dealing with the question of the “individual versus society,” giving particular attention to social contract theories, libertarianism, anarchism and socialism. The course concludes with the study of some contributions of Friedrich Nietzsche and of Cornelius Castoriadis to the various political and ethical issues raised throughout the semester. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

PHI 135
Race, Class and Gender
This course introduces students to questions of self, self-consciousness and identity, and addresses philosophy as a way of living and relating to the world. A special focus is accorded to how humans in communities relate to “others” and how social, cultural or political categories associated with “race,” “class” and” gender” have developed historically and how they may still function today. A closer look at the relation between race and ethnicity, between class and status, and between gender and sexuality allows the class to assess and distinguish “domination” functioning within asymmetries of power and “difference” functioning within negotiable and heterogeneous social and political spaces. General Studies Connections Humanities.

PHI 140
Human Nature
This course examines the diverse views of human nature developed by philosophers as well as by biologists and psychologists. Course topics include free will, minds, bodies and souls, psychological egoism, the state of nature, animal personhood and artificial intelligence. Readings include selections from philosophers and scientists such as Aristotle, Descartes, Darwin, Freud, Hobbes, Rousseau, Marx, Nietzsche, Sartre, Skinner and Wilson. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

PHI 150
Critical Thinking
This course is a study of arguments and rules for correct thinking. Topics include recognition of arguments, uses of language, fallacious arguments and the art of persuasion. Emphasis is on the application of critical thinking skills in both professional and everyday contexts. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

PHY 102
Modern Astronomy
This is an exposition of a wide variety of topics in modern astronomy including celestial motion, stellar spectra and evolution, galaxies, solar systems and cosmology. Three hours of lecture and three-hour laboratory per week. General Studies Foundations-Natural Science.

PHY/OPT 101
Modern Optics and Technology
This course is a survey of basic properties of light, diffraction, holography, interference, imaging and applications to modern technology including telescopes, lasers, CDs, fiber optics and optical data storage. The course satisfies the general studies lab science requirement. Three hours of lecture and three-hour laboratory per week. General Studies Foundations-Natural Science.

POL 101
American Government
This introductory course presents the dynamics of American politics and government. Such factors as public opinion, interest groups, political parties, mass media, Congress, the Presidency, the bureaucracy and the courts are analyzed. The national level of American government is emphasized in this course. General Studies Foundations-Social Science.

PSY 100
General Psychology
This course introduces students to the broad discipline of psychology, focusing on theories and research explaining behavior. Major areas include, but are not limited to, biopsychology, motivation, sensation, perception, learning, cognition, development, stress and health, personality and psychopathology. May be used by non-majors to fulfill the general studies foundations social science requirement.

REL 141
Understanding the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible
A course designed to introduce the student to the Old Testament, also called the Tanak and the Hebrew Bible. The focus of the course is on the history of the nation of Israel and the way in which Israelite literature, laws, theology and religious practices developed in the Near Eastern environment. The course also provides background for understanding the subsequent development of Christianity and its beliefs. Emphasis is on reading the biblical text. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

REL 142
Understanding the New Testament
A critical reading of the New Testament documents through which the early Christians articulated their faith, beliefs, and actions in response to the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth. Special attention is given to the historical and social settings in which Christianity emerged and developed. Students focus on the distinctive purpose and main content of each document, using modern historical-critical methods of New Testament interpretation. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

REL 151
Understanding Judaism, Christianity and Islam
An examination of the major forms of Jewish, Christian and Muslim faiths, including Traditional and Reform Judaism; Eastern Orthodox, Roman Catholic and Protestant Christianity; and Sunni and Shiite Islam. Each tradition is studied from the perspective of what it means to be a member of that community of faith. Brief attention is given to historical origins, traditional beliefs, forms of worship and religious expression, and contemporary problems facing each community. General Studies Connections-Humanities.

REL 152
Religions of India, China and Japan
A study of the major living religions and spiritual practices of India, China and Japan. The emphasis is on the origins and development of such traditions as Hinduism, Buddhism, Shinto, Confucianism and Taoism. The impact that these traditions have had upon culture and how they have dealt with issues of spiritual meaning and formation is emphasized. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

REL 154
Introduction to Classical Mythology
This course will be a survey of the stories of the gods and heroes of ancient Greece and Rome. We will focus primarily on approaching these documents as literary works, but will also examine how they were interpreted and how they functioned within the rituals and practices of Classical religions. Selections of mythology (Homer’s writings, the plays of Euripides, the poems of Ovid, etc.) will be read in English translation. While we will spend some time looking at how these myths and sacred tales have affected later Western art, philosophy and literature, we will primarily examine these myths within their ancient religious, literary, political and social context. General Studies Foundations-Humanities.

SOC 101
Introduction to Sociology
A general study, emphasizing the concepts and methodologies through which the sociologist investigates the nature of the social structure and the social processes related to individual behavior. General Studies Foundations-Social Science.

SOC 201
Social Problems
An introduction to the sociology of social problems. This course concentrates on the sociological analysis of significant problems as they relate to the social institutions in contemporary American society and their global counterparts. It provides an introduction to the sociological research and literature concerning major social problems such as health care, public education, poverty, racism, sexism, etc. General Studies Foundations-Social Science.

SPA 101
Elementary Spanish I
This course is designed for those who have never studied or who have had only minimal exposure to Spanish. It covers basic grammatical concepts and vocabulary related to daily life and limited aspects of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world, and emphasizes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students who successfully complete this course are able to speak and write in very simple ways about familiar and immediate topics and understand the gist of written and spoken Spanish materials on familiar topics. Conducted in Spanish, except for clarification of grammar and culture. Four class meetings per week.

SPA 102
Elementary Spanish II
Continuation of SPA 101. This course expands the students’ ability to understand and produce written and spoken Spanish. It emphasizes accuracy in pronunciation and familiar grammatical constructions and acquisition of new structures that enable students to handle more complex tasks. Spanish 102 emphasizes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, and continues the exploration of cultures of the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of materials. Conducted in Spanish, except for clarification of grammar and culture. Four class meetings per week. Prerequisite: SPA 101

SPA 201
Intermediate Spanish I
This course refines the skills that students acquired in elementary Spanish by developing precision and nuance in topics and grammar previously studied. It enhances the students’ ability to handle communicative tasks necessary for survival in the target culture. Students gain a more acute awareness of cultures of the Spanish-speaking world through the study of a variety of authentic texts, including literary fragments, journalistic pieces, film and other media. Spanish 201 emphasizes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Conducted in Spanish, except for clarification of grammar and culture. Four class meetings per week. Prerequisite: Spanish 102, three or four years of high school Spanish, or permission of instructor.


Getting acclimated to campus

Before the semester begins, Dual Enrollment students will receive information by email, including a campus map and directions, a personal Albright College email address, campus computer login credentials and information on purchasing textbooks. Billing information will sent electronically through Albright email, and payment is due one week before the start of courses.

All Dual Enrollment students are encouraged to schedule a campus visit before starting classes. (Please note that you are a Dual Enrolled student in the form’s “additional request” box.)

Students requesting impairment-related accommodations are encouraged to self-identity with Albright’s Student Accessibility & Advocacy Office at least one month before the start of the semester. Albright College complies with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA) to provide equal access to the educational environment.

Have questions?

For additional information, please contact Nicole Christie, senior associate director of admission at (610) 921-7700 or nchristie@albright.edu.