Albright’s Commitment to an Inclusive, Thriving and Equitable Community

CITE-C would love to hear your thoughts, ideas, and concerns. Please email CITE-C@albright.edu.
This address will send an email to the members of the Steering Committee (Steering Committee
members listed in the Member link, above and to the left). To contact any individual Council
member, please follow the Committee Member link, above and to the left.

History
For a number of years, Albright College’s president has enjoyed the advisory work of the President’s Council on Diversity and Community (PCDC).  This council has done important work, advising the president on matters regarding diversity in the Albright Community.  Since the initiation of this council, both Albright College and our world have continued to evolve and change.  To fulfill Albright’s mission of equity and inclusivity and to create a thriving and welcoming community with full participation for all individuals and groups, leadership must continue to grow and evolve.

photoCouncil for an Inclusive, Thriving, and Equitable Community (“CITE-C”)
The current leadership of inclusivity and equity issues on Albright’s campus is the council for an Inclusive, Thriving and Equitable Community (CITE-C, pronounced “site see”).  This council is advisory to the president and shifts the focus from discussion of diversity matters to a more comprehensive focus on inclusivity and equity.  Members of this council will take a leadership role on campus in understanding, communicating, and demonstrating by example the importance of diversity, inclusivity, and equity in all its dimensions.  Our aspirational goal is true equity and full participation (“full participation” defined by Sturm and colleagues). This council will play an active role in engaging discussion and contributing to a thriving, equitable, and fully participating community. For more information, please see the section below for the Council’s complete charge.  Members of the Albright community are encouraged to communicate questions, ideas and concerns to council members.  Current council membership can be accessed through the “CITE-C Council Members” section below.

photoTheme Years
A key responsibility of the council is the development of a theme for each academic year.  Council members will collaborate with other councils, committees, groups, and with the broader community to identify issues and items of interest and concern to the community.  Recommendations from the community will be sought and encouraged. The theme and its supporting materials will intentionally be made part of some Experience events, some academic and student events.  The theme of the year will culminate with the Campus Conversation in the spring.  Council members will lead and encourage (where appropriate) faculty to integrate parts of the theme and supporting material (or related supporting material) in courses.  More information about this year’s theme can be accessed through the link above and to the left.

Foundational Definitions
The council recognized that the work before us requires clarity of key concepts to serve as guideposts for actualizing institutional values. Some of these terms are already widely used on our campus—diversity and inclusivity, for example. Other terms are newer to our institution but seem essential to marking a more ambitious horizon.  Thus, the council adopted and uses the foundational definitions listed in”Foundational Definitions” section below.

Understanding Diversity: A Community’s Conversation

More details on theme and events coming soon.

Foundational Definitions

July 19, 2017

Council for an Inclusive, Thriving, and Equitable Community


Why do we need definitions?
 The Council recognized that the work before us requires clarity of key concepts to serve as guideposts for actualizing institutional values. Some of these terms are already widely used on our campus—diversity and inclusivity, for example. Other terms are newer to our institution but seem essential to marking a more ambitious horizon.

The Council for an Inclusive, Thriving, and Equitable Community adopts and uses these definitions as foundational to our community:

Diversity: A state of having many forms of difference present in a community, often including a wide range of human differences. At its most basic, diversity refers to demographic difference, especially with respect to those demographic groups that have been historically restrained, excluded, or oppressed.

Inclusivity: What a community does to demonstrate its commitment to diversity. It is how a community honors, values and accepts the diversity among its community members. Inclusivity is observable in the extent to which (a) community members feel a sense of belonging and (b) the community is equitable in its provision and distribution of opportunities among its members.

Community: In this document, “community” refers to the faculty, students and staff members of the Albright College. While the broader Albright community includes many other individuals and constituencies (alumni, Lion fans, etc.), the work described herein focuses on what it means to be a member of the Albright campus community. This definition may evolve as we move forward. Our committee believes that full participation and equity (both defined subsequently) should shape the College’s practices and actions in the local, national, and international communities of which we are a part.

Full participation: An affirmative value focused on creating a campus community in which all community members, whatever their identity, background, or institutional position, thrive, recognize their full potential, engage meaningfully in institutional life, and contribute to the flourishing of others. Full participation means a commitment to the mutual thriving of members of the community, and that the thriving of one group should not come at the expense of the thriving of another group.1 Full participation directs us to focus on achieving equity in terms of opportunity and outcomes afforded by and in higher education.

Equity: The ability of historically under-represented populations to achieve results consistent with full participation. This includes the creation of opportunities for such populations to have equal access to and participate in professional and educational programs that close the achievement and outcome gaps between populations. In higher education, equity can be achieved by eliminating disparities of opportunity, resources, and outcomes for historically underrepresented populations in ways that are consistent with the institutional commitment to full participation. Pursuing equity requires equity-mindedness, an approach guided by an awareness of the ways in which many groups have been historically excluded from professional and educational opportunities or marginalized within the structures and institutions that house those opportunities. Being equity-minded in higher education also means “relocating the cause of disparities in … outcomes from the imagined deficits of [historically excluded groups] to the institutional structures and policies we create.” 2

Thriving: Thriving is a condition of individuals who experience an institution’s commitment to full participation. When a community fosters well-being among all its members, enables individuals to reach their full potential, and intentionally eliminates barriers that prevent them from reaching their full potential, community members thrive. Thriving does not equate to happiness or being comfortable; resilience, stretching one’s potential, making decisions about a balanced and fulfilling life3, and giving oneself permission to fail are all dimensions of thriving.

The Council agrees that equity and full participation are affirmative values and actionable concepts that are imbued with a commitment to justice.

The Council notes that equity and equality are not the same thing. Equality means providing everyone the same resources. Equity takes into consideration the fact that differences in identity, background, and institutional location and conditions can often affect people’s capacity to thrive, recognize their full potential, engage meaningfully in institutional life, and contribute to the flourishing of others. An equitable environment would be one that ensures individuals or groups have what they need to be full participants. This would not necessarily be equal to what others were receiving. It could be more or different.


1 S. Sturm, T. Eatman, J. Saltmarsh, and A. Bush. “Full participation: Building the architecture for diversity and public engagement in higher education.” White Paper, Columbia University Law School, Center for Institutional and Social Change. (2011).

2 K. Witham, L.E. Malcom-Piqueux, A.C. Dowd, and E.M. Bensimon. America’s Unmet Promise: The imperative for equity in higher education. American Association of Colleges & Universities. (2015).

Council for an Inclusive, Thriving, and Equitable, Community
(CITE-C, pronounced “site-see”)

Rationale: For a number of years, Albright College’s President has enjoyed the advisory work of the President’s Council on Diversity and Community (PCDC). This Council has done important work, advising the president on important matters regarding diversity in the Albright Community. Since the initiation of this Council, both Albright College and our world have continued to evolve and change. To fulfill Albright’s mission of equity and inclusivity and to create a thriving and welcoming community with full participation for all individuals and groups, it is time for the intentional evolution of the Council’s focus from discussion of diversity matters to a more comprehensive focus on inclusivity and equity. It is time for the Council to play an active role in engaging discussion and contributing to a thriving, equitable, and fully participating community.

Definitions: The Council has adopted definitions that provide a foundation for our work. These definitions are found on the Council’s website.

Charge: The Council will serve as an advisory group to the Albright College President. This Council will model what we value across our entire community: a respectful environment where diversity of thought is encouraged and celebrated, where discussion of difficult topics is engaged, where Council members are enabled and engaged to try new initiatives; where Council members appreciate a holistic approach to identity, and where Council members speak freely without judgment. The Council will be tasked to:

  1. Take a leadership role on campus in understanding, communicating, and demonstrating by example the importance of diversity, inclusivity, and equity in all its dimensions. Our aspirational goal is for our actions to demonstrate that we value all people.
  2. Be proactive in ensuring that matters of diversity, inclusivity, equity, and full participation (full participation defined by Sturm, Eatman, Saltmarsh, and Bush can be found here) are intentionally considered in all aspects of Albright College’s work and planning.
  3. Lead the development of a campus-wide theme and supporting reading material around a particular topic related (broadly) to diversity, inclusivity and equity. This theme and supporting materials will be developed during the spring semester, announced at the end of the spring semester, and ready for implementation in the subsequent fall semester.
    1. During the development of the theme and the supporting reading list, the Council Members will collaborate with other Councils, Committees, Groups, and with the broader community on issues and items of interest and concern to the community. Recommendations from the community will be sought and encouraged.
    2. The theme and its supporting materials will intentionally be made part of some experience events, some academic and student events. The theme of the year will culminate in the Campus Conversation in the spring.
    3. Council members will lead and encourage (where appropriate) faculty to integrate parts of the theme and supporting material (or related supporting material) in courses.
    4. Council members will take a leadership role in engaging the community in engagement with the theme and its events.
  4. Provides and engages all members of the community to provide material for a website that will provide a common place for location of all events, programs, speakers, and other campus work and efforts around the themes of diversity, inclusion, equity, and thriving. This website will also include public documentation of Council meetings and topics discussed.
  5. Recommend opportunities for professional development for community members (faculty, staff, and students) that will support their learning and understanding of inclusivity, equity, and bias (implicit or explicit) matters, and how issues raised may be responded to.
  6. Occasionally, at the direction of the President, the Faculty, or Human Resources, review College policies and procedures to ensure that Albright’s commitment to inclusivity, equity, and full participation is articulated and carried through the College’s policies and procedures.
  7. Be engaged with planning processes, to ensure that matters of inclusivity, equity, and full participation are well-represented.
  8. Be engaged with the Council and represent the activities and work of the Council in their respective departments, units and divisions.

Membership: With the exception of ex officio members, Council members will serve terms of three years. Group members will serve overlapping terms, so that new and more experience Council members contribute from each group. Membership will comprise the following groups:

  1. Administrative Leadership Team (all ex officio):
    1. VP of Student Affairs and Dean of Students
    2. Chair of the Campus Life Council
    3. Director of Human Resources
    4. Chaplain
    5. Director of Student Involvement and Leadership & Coordinator of Multicultural Programs
    6. Assistant Dean of Students
    7. AVP Communication and External Relations
  2. Faculty: Four faculty will serve on the Council, selected for diversity in all its dimensions. These faculty will represent the various academic divisions on campus. Faculty may be full or part-time and will be selected from those who are contributing to the campus community and teaching on an ongoing basis.
  3. Staff and administration: Six staff will serve on the Council, three exempt and three hourly employees. These staff will represent all divisions (Administrative & Financial Services, Enrollment Management, Advancement, Academic Affairs, and Student Affairs) of the College.
  4. Students: Four students will serve on the Council, preferably one representative from each class year.

Note: once new name, charge and membership are agreed to, the Council will develop a transition plan, for transitioning the current membership to the new membership.

CITE-C Council Members

Steering Committee

Paul Clark ’73, Chaplain

Tiffany Clayton ’08, Director of Student Involvement and Leadership; Coordinator of Multicultural Programs

Gina-Lyn Crance, Vice President for Student Affairs & Dean of Students

Amanda Hanincik ’00, Assistant Dean of Students

Kim Hubric, Director of Human Resources

Jeffrey Lentz ’85, Senior Artist in Residence, Theatre, Music

Jennifer Stoudt, Acting Assistant Vice President of College Relations & Marketing

Council Membership

Michael J. Bowman, Facilities Set-up Crew
Term Expires:  May 2019

Sarah K. Brant, Director of Athletics Marketing
Term Expires: May 2019

Yenny Colon, General Accountant
Term Expires:  May 2019

Angela Espinoza ’19, Student
Term Expires:  May 2019 

Mark Feeney, Maintenance Mechanic
Term Expires:  May 2018

Teresa Gilliams, Chair & Associate Professor of English
Term Expires:  May 2017

Scott Hettinger, Graphic Designer
Term Expires: May 2018 

Beth Kiester, Assistant Professor of Sociology
Term Expires:  May 2018 

Shreeyash Palshikar, Assistant Professor of World History
Term Expires: May 2019 

Meredith Pennypacker ’18, Student
Term Expires:  May 2018

Rashmi Radhakrishnan, CIO
Term Expires: May 2018 

Ian J. Rhile, Assoc. Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Term Expires: May 2019

Jonathan Ruiz ’20, Student
Term Expires:  May 2019 

Robert P. Seesengood, Assoc. Professor of Religious Studies
Term Expires: May 2019

Diane Sheetz, Assistant Bookstore Manager
Term Expires: May 2018

Carrie Skulley, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Term Expires:  May 2019

Josh Williams, Facilities Operations & Maintenance Manager
Term Expires:  May 2018

If you have an event you would like posted, please email cite-c@albright.edu.

  • World Languages Film Festival #5: Aqui y allá/Here and There (2012, 110 min.) by Antonio Méndez Esparza
    Thur., Oct. 19, 7-9:30 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall
  • World Languages Film Festival #6: Le bonheur d’Elza/Elza’s hapiness(2011, 78 min.) by Lise Raven
    Thur., Oct. 23, 7-9:30 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall
  • A Colombian Education: Cultural Foundations Lecture
    Mon., Oct. 25, 7-9:30 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall
  • First Friday, artistic showcase featuring our talented campus artists, October 6, 7-9pm, Student Center Main Lounge
  • First Friday, artistic showcase featuring our talented campus artists, October 20, 7-9pm, Student Center Main Lounge
  • Bi-Weekly Meetings of the American Sign Language Club
    All are Welcome!
    Nov. 1, Nov. 15, Nov. 29, Dec. 6
    4 p.m., Masters Hall, Room 211
  • Clinicas de Migrantes
    Experience EventFilm Screening and discussion pertaining to the health of undocumented immigrantsNov 8, 2017, 7-9 p.m., Klein Lecture Hall
  • Roop Hall Ball, artistic showcase talented acts, and a dance, December 1, 7-11pm, Roop Hall
  • First Friday, artistic showcases featuring our talented campus artists, January 26, 7-9pm, Student Center Main Lounge
  • First Friday, artistic showcases featuring our talented campus artists, February 2, 7-9pm, Student Center Main Lounge
  • First Friday, artistic showcases featuring our talented campus artists, March 2, 7-9pm, Student Center Main Lounge
  • ASTEP Celebrationshowcases artistic endeavors and collaborations of Olivet boys and girls club, and volunteers, April 6, 5:30-9pm, CFA
  • Roop Hall Ball, artistic showcase talented acts, and a dance, April 27, 7-11pm, Roop Hall