Empowering Albright Voices | Albright College

Empowering Albright Voices

At Albright College, we understand that our differences make us stronger. Albrightians are dedicated to cultivating mutual respect for all community members and maintaining an environment free of discrimination and intimidation. We strive to build an inclusive and equitable academic community in which all community members thrive, recognize their full potential, engage meaningfully in institutional life, and contribute to the flourishing of others.

Join us in #EmpoweringAlbrightVoices and celebrating Albright’s remarkable diversity!

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Wholly Earth: Black Feminist Ecologies and Sustainable Futures” is a day-long Albright College virtual symposium, hosted by professors Kami Fletcher, Ph.D., and Mark Lomanno, Ph.D. Inspired by an album of the same name by the late vocalist Abbey Lincoln, this symposium will feature workshops, roundtables and research presentations from the arts, humanities, natural and social sciences. Participants will focus on the innovative contributions of Black feminist activist, artistic and scholarly practices that can provide models for more equitable and inclusive life. In the spirit of Albright’s celebrated interdisciplinary education, this symposium is an opportunity for the entire campus community.

Wholly Earth Events speakers include:


April 7 symposium schedule:

8:30-9:20 a.m. — Welcome (Zoom link)
Wholly Earth’s organizers, and President, Jacquelyn S. Fetrow, Ph.D. ’82, welcome the entire Albright community, and all those joining us from around the world, to the day’s events.

9:30-10:30 a.m. — “An Anthology of Black Lesbian Thought,” (Zoom link)
African American lesbian writers and theorists have made extraordinary contributions to feminist theory, activism, and writing. Briona Jones, editor of Mouths of Rain, addresses pervasive issues such as misogynoir and anti-blackness while also attending to love, romance, “coming out” and the erotic.

10 a.m. — Performances by Albright Rap Collective and Lion Records artists (Amphitheatre)

10 a.m. — Your Voice, One Word (McMillan Center)
Every day we make choices and decisions based on who we are and what we value. In this day of celebration of our unique identities, we want you to think about the one word that guides you, that inspires you. Come stamp it out on a bracelet as a daily reminder of who you are and the amazing things you’re capable of. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

11 a.m. — “Archeological investigations of the African American experience at Hopewell Furnace National Historical Park,” Experience Event (Zoom link)
How can archeology help us better understand and interpret the experiences of both enslaved and free African Americans who worked at Hopewell Furnace? Presented by Amy Fedchenko, Ph.D., and Jared Muehlbauer

11 a.m.-4 p.m. — Foods of the world (Dining Hall)
Enjoy foods from various cuisines found around the world to bring us together and enrich our experiences with each other. The day’s cuisines will include Caribbean, Greek, Thai, African and European.

12 p.m. — “Allyship and appropriation of Black artists” (Zoom link)
What does inclusive performance sound like? How can a demographically-diverse ensemble celebrate Black art responsibly? Composer Brittney Boykin will discuss performing Black music, how it relates to the performing arts in higher education, and more broadly, music’s function in society.

1 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 4 p.m. — The Amazing Race (Science Field)
Accessibility barriers and challenges face our students every day on and off campus. The Amazing Race will put you face-to-face with these barriers in challenges set up around campus to highlight mobility, dietary and sensory issues. Students can sign up in teams of two, or we’ll pair you together, to complete and conquer! Sponsored by the Office of Accessibility and Access, Multicultural Affairs and Shayla Gaither — SGA’s minority and disability student representative.

1 p.m. — Texture talk: tips, techniques and trends” (Zoom link, McMillan Center main lounge)
Join the members of the Black Women Leadership Association for a virtual/in-person discussion. Then chat with the presenters and pick up a hair care goodie bag.

2 p.m. — “Sustaining faith in African American traditions,” Experience Event (Zoom link)
This panel discussion with Brenda Ingram Wallace, Ph.D., Ibrahim Bangura, M.Div., and Quentin Wallace, D. Min., will explore ways in which aspects of faith have sustained people of African descent from slavery to the current day.

3 p.m. — Showcase performances by Albright Rap Collective and Lion Records artists (Amphitheatre)

4-5:30 p.m. — KEYNOTE PANEL “Imagining Black Feminist Ecologies: Sustainable Futures for a Wholly Earth” (Zoom link)
Inspired by the late jazz vocalist Abbey Lincoln, a pre-eminent panel of invited scholars, activists and educators explore Black feminist ecology from a variety of perspectives, asking how we all might respond to Lincoln’s call for a more “wholly earth.” Speakers will include Shannon J. Effinger, Omi Osun Joni L. Jones, Ph.D., Kameelah Martin, Ph.D., Yvette Modestin, and moderator Kami Fletcher.

4 p.m. — Paint what empowers you (McMillan Center)
Paint ceramic tiles representing your strength and inspirations. We’ll provide the tools, you provide the creativity.

8 p.m. — Pride+ student drag show (Chapel)
Join the students of Pride+ and AC2 in celebrating 100 years of drag in the nation. It’s a night that promises entertainment, empowerment and a beautiful tradition of expression.

Student presentation on Albright’s Central Pennsylvania African American Museum art collection artifacts. (Online)

Albright Choral Ensembles and Lion Record artists’ music (Online)

Albright College Choral Ensembles

Let Them Hear You – The Color Purple from The Color Purple” (arr. Dilworth), 20:31, soloist, Miranda Holliday ’20.

Make Them Hear You” from Ragtime.

A Rose Has Sprung Up” Coventry, arr. Brittney Boykin (commission composer), 22:40, soloist, Olivia Trace.

Lion Records Artists

Max444, Hip-Hop/Instrumental
Max444 is a Bay Area native artist focused on songwriting and music production. He incorporates all genres of music in his production style but is rooted as an MC at heart. His goals are to create a culture of creativity and passion and is common quoted saying, “Love what you do, if not now, when?”

Nillatron (Niles Harris), Hip/Hop & Rap, Lo-Fi

Nostalgic Love
Reminsce
Sunrise
1999
Self-Doubt
The son of Randallstown’s favorite producer, Niles Allen Harris was born on May 1, 1999. Niles discovered his passion for music in third grade by playing with his father’s virtual DJ software on their computer. In October 2019 Niles released his first Ep “I Want Peace.” and on May 4, 2020 Nillatron released “Analog Vice” an EP heavily inspired by Lo-Fi sounds and Synthwave. Lo-Fi and Synthwave sounds mixed with a relatable laid-back and nostalgic personality, that’s Nillatron, and it’ll all be up for display on his upcoming album “Slow Down, Father Time.”

Kenny Rojas, Modern Latin Fusion
Corazon de Oro
Mi Golondrina
Bayville, N.J. native, Kenny Rojas, is a Mexican singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist hoping to etch his family’s name into the music industry with his sonic fusion of Modern and Classic Latin music. Growing up, Kenny was always surrounded by music, spending most of his time as a child sitting with his father and uncle as they played their time away on their old family guitars. As Kenny grew up, his father and uncle introduced him to their nightly musical ritual, encouraging him to play along with them, or sing what little lyrics he knew. Kenny cultivated his skills overtime, and the more he played, the bigger his love for music became. Kenny recognized that many people on his father’s side of the family were exceptionally musically gifted, but nothing ever came of their talents. Kenny has since set out to be the first in his family to give this talent the audience it deserves.


Celebrating Albright’s diversity isn’t something that should be bound by a single day.

Join us for ongoing #EmpoweringAlbrightVoices events throughout the year, including:

April 8 – Diversity, Equity and Inclusion “Teach-in”
Events on April 8 will help faculty discuss and incorporate #EmpoweringAlbrightVoices ideas into coursework.

April 12 @ 4 p.m. – “COVID-19’s impact on vulnerable populations,” Experience Event (Pre-register on Zoom)
The global pandemic has disrupted the lives of people around the world and has exposed inequality already facing vulnerable populations. Beth Kiester, Ph.D. (sociology) and Kate Lehman, Ph.D. (communications) will present research and lead a discussion on the pandemic’s disproportionate impact on diverse groups including immigrants, communities of color and women of all backgrounds.

April 15 @ 4 p.m. – “Symbols of the Insurrection,” Experience Event (Pre-register on Zoom)
When protestors stormed the Capital building on January 6, 2021, they carried flags, wore insignia, and blew horns. What do these symbols and images mean? How are they connected to larger ideologies, both secular and religious? Maite Barragán, Ph.D., (art history) and Jennifer Koosed, Ph.D. (religious studies) will explore the various meanings of the symbols, and discuss the various groups associated with these symbols.

May. 20 @ 6 p.m. – “The Deportation Machine: America’s Long History of Expelling Immigrants,” (Pre-register on Zoom)
In recent years, the topic of immigration has been central to our national and local politics. In his new book The Deportation Machine (Princeton UP), author and historian Adam Goodman traces the long and troubling history of the US government’s systematic efforts to terrorize and expel immigrants since the late 19th century.


Want to learn more about Inclusivity and Equity at Albright?