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Psychology
 

Associate Professor Gwendolyn Seidman, Ph.D., Chair
Professors Ronald G. Green, Ph.D. '62Marsha B. Green, Ph.D. '63 and Patricia Ann Snyder, Ph.D. '70
Associate Professors Julia F. Heberle, Ph.D.Susan M. Hughes, Ph.D. and Brenda J. Ingram-Wallace, Ph.D.
Assistant Professors Justin J. Couchman, Ph.D. and Keith Feigenson, Ph.D.

The Psychology Department offers comprehensive programs in psychology and psychobiology.

In addition, students may create a variety of combined majors, combining psychology with elementary education, special education, Spanish, criminology, philosophy or political science.

All psychology students complete independent research, learn computer technology skills, and receive personalized mentoring by faculty members. Junior and senior level independent research, fieldwork internships, service learning and seminars are highly valued components of the psychology undergraduate experience. Students work closely with their advisers to select courses that complement their major interests and career goals.


PLEASE NOTE: The requirements listed below apply to the class of 2018 and beyond. Please click here for the requirements for the class of 2017 and earlier.


Major in Psychology

The bachelor of arts degree program in psychology provides a balance of theoretical and applied courses in the discipline and prepares students for graduate study, professional school, or careers in social services, business, research and educational settings.

Requirements:

All of the following Core Requirements
• PSY 100 General Psychology (fulfills the general studies foundations-social science requirement)
• PSY 200 Research Design & Analysis I (fulfills general studies foundations-quantitative reasoning requirement)
• PSY 201 Research Design & Analysis II 
• PSY 405 or 406 Senior Seminar

One Research Laboratory Course
• PSY 395 Psychological Assessment
• PSY 396 Advanced Research Lab in Social, Personality or Developmental Psychology
• PSY 397 Advanced Research Lab in Biological, Cognitive or Evolutionary Psychology

Three from Group I-Social, Developmental and Clinical Approaches
• PSY 206 Social
• PSY 250 Personality
• PSY 230 Human Development-OR-PSY 240 Child Development
• PSY 390 Adult Psychopathology-OR-PSY 391 Child Psychopathology

Three from Group II-Biological, Cognitive and Evolutionary Approaches
• PSY 205 Biological Bases of Behavior
• PSY 305 Behavioral Neuroscience
• PSY 319 Evolutionary Psychology
• PSY 340 Cognition
• PSY 350 Animal Behavior and Cognition
• PSY 355 Motivation
• PSY 360 Sensation and Perception
• PSY 306 Special Topics (Biologically-based, Health Psychology, Drugs and Behavior)

Three from Group III-Elective Courses
• Any of the above courses not already taken
• PSY 271 Organizational Psychology
• PSY 290 Diversity
• PSY 291 Cross-Cultural Psychology
• PSY 306 Special Topics courses in any area
• PSY 321 Close Relationships
• PSY 345 Language Development
• PSY 365 Ecological Psychology
• PSY 394 Counseling
• IDS 303 Sex Roles
• PSY 401 Field Work
• PSY 396 or 397 Advanced Research Lab (with a different emphasis as taken above)
• PSY 281, 381, 481 Independent Study/Advanced Research
• PSY 282, 382, 482 Internship

One Related Course (200-level or higher) in the Social or Natural Sciences or an additional Psychology course (200-level or higher)

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Interdisciplinary Major in Psychobiology

The bachelor of science in psychobiology is intended for students with an interest in both the behavioral and natural science approaches to psychology and biology. The major is especially ideal for developing an appreciation for the emerging fields of neuroscience and health psychology. Individuals arrange courses to satisfy their particular interests and prepare for advanced study in psychology, psychobiology, biology, behavioral ecology, veterinary medicine, the health professions (medicine, dentistry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, optometry), or employment in varied areas including pharmaceutical research or sales and allied health professions.

Psychobiology majors must declare one of two tracks: Molecular Psychobiology Track (more biologically-oriented) or Behavioral Psychobiology Track (more psychologically-oriented).

Behavioral Psychobiology Track

The Behavioral Psychology Track is more psychologically-oriented and is intended for those pursuing graduate work in health psychology, behavioral research, and some mental health related fields.

• Psychology Core Requirements:

- PSY 100 General Psychology (fulfills the general studies foundations-social science requirement)
- PSY 200 Research Design & Analysis I (fulfills general studies foundations-quantitative reasoning requirement)
- PSY 201 Research Design & Analysis II
- PSY 205 Biological Foundations of Behavior
- PSY 397 Advanced Research Lab in Biological, Cognitive or Evolutionary Psychology
- PSY 405 or 406 Senior Seminar

• Biology Core Requirements:

- BIO 151 General Biology I (fulfills the general studies foundations-natural science requirement)
- BIO 203 Genetics

• One from Group I (Social, Developmental and Clinical Psychology):

- PSY 206 Social Psychology
- PSY 250 Personality
- PSY 230 Human Development-OR-PSY 240 Child Development 
- PSY 390 Adult Psychopathology-OR-PSY 391 Child Psychopathology

• Two from Group II (Biological, Cognitive and Evolutionary Psychology):

- PSY 305 Behavioral Neuroscience
- PSY 319 Evolutionary Psychology
- PSY 340 Cognition
- PSY 350 Animal Behavior and Cognition
- PSY 355 Motivation and Learning
- PSY 360 Sensation and Perception
- PSY 306 Special Topics (Biologically-based, Health Psychology, Drugs and Behavior)

• Three from Group III-One must be at least 300-level (Biological Science):

- BIO 152 General Biology II
- BIO 220 Evolution
- BIO 234 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 
- BIO 235 Human Anatomy & Physiology II
- BIO 319 Vertabrate Natural History
- BIO 327 Histology
- BIO 331 Comparative Vertabrate Anatomy
- BIO 333 Developmental Biology
- BIO 337 Comparative Animal Physiology & Ecophysiology

• Two Elective Courses:

- Any Psychology course not previously taken
- Any Biology course not previously taken
- CHE 105 General Analytical Chemistry I

 

Molecular Psychobiology Track

The Molecular Psychobiology Track is more biologically-oriented and is intended for those pursuing graduate work in neuroscience, the medical field and other related fields.

• Psychology Core Requirements:

- PSY 100 General Psychology (fulfills the general studies foundations-social science requirement)
- PSY 200 Research Design & Analysis I (fulfills general studies foundations-quantitative reasoning requirement)
- PSY 201 Research Design & Analysis II 
- PSY 205 Biological Foundations of Behavior
- PSY 397 Advanced Research Lab in Biological, Cognitive or Evolutionary Psychology

• Biology and Chemistry Core Requirements:

- BIO 151 General Biology I (fulfills the general studies foundations-natural science requirement)
- BIO 203 Genetics
- CHE 105 General Analytical Chemistry I 
- CHE 106 General Analytical Chemistry II

• Two from Group I (Biological, Cognitive and Evolutionary Psychology):

- PSY 305 Behavioral Neuroscience
- PSY 319 Evolutionary Psychology
- PSY 340 Cognition 
- PSY 350 Animal Behavior and Cognition
- PSY 355 Motivation and Learning
- PSY 360 Sensation and Perception
- PSY 306 Special Topics (Biologically-based, Health Psychology, Drugs and Behavior)

• Two from Group II (Molecular Biological Sciences):

- CHE 207 Organic Chemistry I
- BIO 220 Evolution
- BIO 321 Microbiology 
- BIO 322 Cell Biology
- BIO 325 Molecular Genetics
- BIO 327 Histology


• One from Group III (Organismal Biological Sciences):

- BIO 152 General Biology II
- BIO 234 Human Anatomy & Physiology I
- BIO 235 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 
- BIO 331 Comparative Vertabrate Anatomy
- BIO 333 Developmental Biology
- BIO 337 Comparative Animal Physiology and Ecophysiology


• One Psychology or Biology Elective course not previously taken.

• One Senior Seminar:

- PSY 405 or 406 Senior Seminar
- BIO 490's Senior Seminar

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Psi Chi
(The National Honor Society in Psychology)

http://www.psichi.org

What is Psi Chi?

Seal of Psi ChiPsi Chi is the National Honor Society in Psychology, founded in 1929 for the purposes of encouraging, stimulating, and maintaining excellence in scholarship, and advancing the science of psychology. Membership is open to graduate and undergraduate men and women who are making the study of psychology one of their major interests, and who meet the minimum qualifications. Psi Chi is a member of the Association of College Honor Societies and is an affiliate of the American Psychological Association (APA) and the Association for Psychological Science (APS). Psi Chi's sister honor society is Psi Beta, the national honor society in psychology for community and junior colleges.

Psi Chi functions as a federation of chapters located at over 1,000 senior colleges and universities in the USA and Canada. The National Office is located in Chattanooga, Tennessee. A National Council, composed of psychologists who are Psi Chi members and are elected by the chapters, guides the affairs of the organization and sets policy with the approval of the chapters.

Psi Chi serves two major goals-one immediate and visibly rewarding to the individual member, the other slower and more difficult to accomplish, but offering greater rewards in the long run. The first of these is the Society's obligation to provide academic recognition to its inductees by the mere fact of membership. The second goal is the obligation of each of the Society's local chapters to nurture the spark of that accomplishment by offering a climate congenial to members' creative development. For example, the chapters make active attempts to nourish and stimulate professional growth through programs designed to augment and enhance the regular curriculum and to provide practical experience and fellowship through affiliation with the chapter. In addition, the national organization provides programs to help achieve these goals, including national and regional conventions held annually in conjunction with the psychological associations, research award competitions, and certificate recognition programs.

The Society publishes a quarterly magazine, Eye on Psi Chi, which helps to unite the members, inform them, and recognize their contributions and accomplishments. The quarterly Psi Chi Journal of Undergraduate Research fosters and rewards the scholarly efforts of undergraduate psychology students and provides a valuable learning experience by introducing them to the publishing and review process.

Students become members by joining the chapter at the school where they are enrolled. Psi Chi chapters are operated by student officers and faculty advisors.Together they select and induct the members and carry out the goals of the Society. All chapters register their inductees at the National Office, where membership records are preserved for reference purposes. The total number of memberships registered at the National Office is now over 500,000 lifetime members. Many of these members have gone on to distinguished careers in psychology.

Becoming a Member

Membership in Psi Chi is open to those who are making the study of psychology one of their major interests and who are students or faculty members in an institution where a chapter is located (if your school does not have a Psi Chi chapter, have you considered starting a chapter?). Undergraduate and graduate students and faculty members who meet the criteria below are eligible for membership. Students and faculty are elected to membership by the chapter at the institution, according to the provisions in the national Psi Chi Constitution. Membership in Psi Chi is open to qualified candidates of any age, sex, sexual orientation, race, handicap or disability, color, religion, and national and ethnic origin.

The Psi Chi Constitution requires that undergraduate student applicants to Psi Chi:

  • Must be enrolled as a student at your school
  • Must have established a GPA at your school
  • Must be at least a second-semester sophomore
  • Must be enrolled as a major or minor in a psychology program or a program psychological in nature that is equivalent to a psychology major
  • Must have completed at least 9 semester hours or 14 quarter hours of psychology courses at your school
  • Must have an overall GPA that is in the top 35% of their class based on rankings within sophomore, within junior, and within senior classes (if the cut-off for the top 35% is below 3.00, the applicant must have an overall GPA of at least 3.00 on a 4-point scale)
  • Must have a psychology GPA that is at least 3.00 on a 4-point scale

    * Undergraduate students who have transferred to a new institution and are interested in becoming a Psi Chi member must meet the requirements listed above, plus complete one semester at the new institution to establish a GPA and complete 9 hours of psychology courses at the new institution.

The Psi Chi Constitution requires that graduate student applicants to Psi Chi:

  • Must be enrolled as a graduate student at your school in a psychology graduate program
  • Must have established a GPA at your school
  • Must have an overall GPA of at least 3.00 on a 4-point scale in all graduate courses, including psychology courses

    ** Graduate students who have transferred to a new institution and are interested in becoming a Psi Chi member must complete one semester at the new institution to establish a GPA in addition to the above requirements.

Regarding faculty who are chapter advisors or who want to join Psi Chi:

  • The Psi Chi Constitution (see Article XII, Section 7) requires that all Psi Chi faculty chapter advisors be members of Psi Chi. If you are not a Psi Chi member, please send your membership registration form and fee as soon as possible.
  • Psi Chi National Council policy requires that faculty chapter advisors be full-time faculty members and hold a doctoral degree in psychology.
  • Psi Chi National Council policy requires that faculty members who want to join Psi Chi must be full-time faculty members at your school and have a doctoral degree in psychology or a psychology related field.

Undergraduate or graduate students transferring to a new institution who are already a Psi Chi member may transfer their membership to the new institution's Psi Chi chapter by making contact with the Psi Chi faculty advisor, completing a Transfer of Membership form, and having the advisor sign and forward the transfer form to the Psi Chi National Office.

Psi Chi chapters may not impose any type of service activity as a condition for membership in Psi Chi-membership eligibility is based on academic performance.

Psi Chi chapters may use more stringent academic criteria for membership than those required in the Psi Chi Constitution, but they cannot use lower academic standards than those required in the Constitution.

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