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chemistry and biochemistry at albright

Professor Pamela G. Artz, Ph.D. '87, Chair
Professor Frieda L. Texter, Ph.D. '72
Associate Professors Christian S. Hamann, Ph.D. and  Ian J. Rhile, Ph.D.
Assistant Professors Christopher R. Graves, Ph.D. and Jeffrey P. Wolbach, Ph.D.
Instructor: Michele L. Cramer, M.S.
Emeritus Professors  Phillip L. Dougherty, Ph.D. and Robert D. Rapp, Ph.D.

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FUSION

FUSION
A periodic newsletter
about the sciences
at Albright College


Courses

CHE 100
Chemistry and Society
This course is an introduction to chemistry through the study of relevant issues set in their political, economic, social, international and ethical context. The course content enables students to learn chemistry in the framework of their own lives and significant issues facing science and the world. These include air quality, the ozone layer, global warming, energy, alternative fuels, environmental pollutants, drug design and genetic engineering. The chemical content is presented as needed to provide a basis for the understanding of these topics. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. This course will satisfy the General Studies Laboratory Science requirement (classes entering before Fall 2013) or the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement (classes entering Fall 2013 or later).

CHE 101
The Natural Science of Daily Life

This course provides and exploration of the science that underpins everyday life. In this course, students will foster an appreciation of how the natural sciences are essential to the common items of daily life. As illustrations, students will examine the science behind objects such as wine and cheese, candles, tablecloths, silverware, flowers, and MP3 players. This investigation will transform their perspective from end-users to informed individuals. Lecture will focus on examples of theory and experiment in a range of fields within the natural sciences, and the connection between natural sciences and other areas explored in the General Studies curriculum. Laboratory work and field trips will be dedicated to investigating the phenomena discussed during lecture using an inquiry-based approach. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. This course will satisfy the General Studies Laboratory Science requirement (classes entering before Fall 2013) or the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement (classes entering Fall 2013 or later).

CHE 103
Introduction to Forensic Science
This course is designed for student observation and comprehension of the basic physical and biological sciences and their influence within forensic science. Topic selection is based on the most frequently encountered scenarios for practicing forensic scientists. Lectures center around the following subjects: evidence documentation and recovery; fingerprint and impression collection; body fluid/product preservation and examination; DNA analysis; toxicology; firearms; fire and explosion; and court conduct and testimony. The laboratory consists of an introduction to scientific observation and experimentation and some of the basic operations used during investigations in applied forensics. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. This course will satisfy the General Studies Laboratory Science requirement (classes entering before Fall 2013) or the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement (classes entering Fall 2013 or later).

CHE 104
Physical Science
This course introduces students to phenomena in the physical world and helps them understand the relationships that govern these phenomena. Topics include the structure of matter, chemical bonds and reactions, laws of motion and gravity, electromagnetism, and the study of heat, sound, and light. This course will satisfy the General Studies Laboratory Science requirement (classes entering before Fall 2013) or the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement (classes entering Fall 2013 or later)or the Physical Science requirement for students in the middle-level certificate education program. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.

CHE 105
General Analytical Chemistry I
This course is an intensive study of the main concepts of chemistry, and covers qualitative and quantitative descriptions of matter and reactivity. The description of matter includes the atomic and subatomic scale (atomic structure, bonding, geometry and intermolecular forces) and the macroscopic scale (phases of matter and solutions). Reactivity topics include basic patterns of reactivity, reaction stoichiometry and thermochemistry. Both conceptual learning and quantitative problem solving are emphasized. The laboratory program involves inorganic synthesis and qualitative analysis. This course will satisfy the General Studies Laboratory Science requirement (classes entering before Fall 2013) or the General Studies Foundations-Natural Science requirement (classes entering Fall 2013 or later) typically for students  planning to concentrate in chemistry, biochemistry, biology or a related field. Facility with algebra is assumed. Four hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.

CHE 106
General Analytical Chemistry II
This course is a continuation of CHE 105 that covers kinetics, equilibrium, spontaneity and an introduction to inorganic chemistry. Within these topics, acid-base (proton transfer equilibrium) chemistry, electrochemistry (electron transfer equilibrium) and solubility (solid-ion equilibrium) are discussed. The introduction to inorganic chemistry includes descriptive chemistry of metals and nonmetals, coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry and environmental chemistry. The laboratory program focuses on quantitative analysis with an introduction to the use of chemical instrumentation. Facility with algebra is assumed. Four hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHE 105

CHE 200
Health, Safety and Asset Protection
This course is a survey of industrial and academic workplace safety as well as home safety, with a focus on increasing awareness concerning hazardous situations. The legal, economic and environmental impact of accidents is considered. Topics include: requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) legislation; Worker Right-to-Know laws; individual and corporate responsibility; emergency planning & preparedness; chemical, electrical, mechanical, biological, blood borne pathogen, radioactive material and fire related safety; materials storage, waste disposal and proper labeling; Material Safety Data Sheets; and laboratory safety in industrial and academic settings. Current and historical events related to these topics are discussed. The course includes visits to local industries to meet with professional safety officers (transportation is included) and to survey the practice of industrial hygiene. Prerequisite: CHE 105 or permission of instructor

CHE 207
Organic Chemistry I
This course studies the chemistry of carbon and other nonmetals (including hydrogen, boron, nitrogen, phosphorous, oxygen, sulfur and the halogens) as grouped into characteristic classes of organic compounds. Topics include the structure, bonding, physical properties and reactivity of covalent and ionic molecules as well as organometallic species. Paradigms of stereochemistry, reaction mechanism, reaction kinetics and thermodynamics, and structure/ property correlation are considered.  Laboratory work is devoted to the synthesis and characterization of organic compounds, the study of molecular modeling and the study of reaction kinetics and thermodynamics. Emphasis is placed on proper laboratory technique; experiment design; and laboratory data collection, reporting and interpretation. Three hours of lecture, one hour of conference group and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHE 106

CHE 208
Organic Chemistry II
A continuation of Organic Chemistry I, this course utilizes the foundations established in that course for the study of the chemistry of organic molecules including their physical and chemical properties; synthesis and characteristic reactions; and identification by chemical and spectroscopic analysis. Topics are organized by functional group (an atom or group of atoms in a molecule that exhibit a characteristic set of physical and chemical properties) and are considered in the context of organic synthesis as well as biological, economic and environmental import. Spectroscopic analysis (circular dichroism, infrared, ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass) is applied to structural studies. Laboratory work is devoted to the synthesis and characterization of organic compounds. Physical characterization, spectroscopic techniques and qualitative analysis are employed in the elucidation of structure. Emphasis is placed on proper laboratory technique; experiment design; and laboratory data collection, reporting and interpretation. Three hours of lecture, one hour of conference group and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHE 207

CHE 321
Physical Chemistry I
This course emphasizes introductory quantum theory, spectroscopy and statistical thermodymanics. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: CHE 106, 208; PHY 202; MAT 132

CHE 322
Physical Chemistry II
A continuation of 321, this course emphasizes classical thermodynamics, reaction equilibria and reaction kinetics. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: CHE 321

CHE 323
Instrumental Analysis
This course represents a study of the theory of modern instrumental methods of chemical analysis. Topics include various spectroscopic techniques such as infrared, ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence, atomic absorption and emission, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Mass spectrometry, liquid and gas chromatography, and various evaluative mathematical techniques also are discussed. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
Corequisite: CHE 321

CHE 324
Inorganic Chemistry
This course will survey the structures, bonding models, reactivity profiles, and applications of inorganic elements and their compounds. Representative chemistries of the main-group, transition metal and f-block elements will be covered. Modern methods of synthesis and analysis of inorganic compounds are the focus of the laboratory sessions. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
Corequisite: CHE 322

CHE 325
Biochemistry I
This course studies the relationships between the chemical structure and biological functions of nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and biological membranes.  Experimental techniques used in the purification and/or analysis of each of these classes of macromolecules are introduced in the lecture and laboratory. These techniques include polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, column chromatography, gas chromatography and polarimetry. Spectroscopic analysis(ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence, circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance) is used extensively over the course of the year. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: CHE 208

CHE 326
Biochemistry II (W)
This course emphasizes membrane transport, enzyme catalysis and kinetics, biochemical signaling, metabolic pathways and their regulation, electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation.  The study of metabolism focuses on those pathways related to carbohydrate metabolism.  The laboratory is a continuation of the first semester. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: CHE 325

CHE 411
Advanced Organic Chemistry
This seminar course explores organic chemistry using physical and mechanistic organic concepts, including molecular orbital theory. Problem solving and  current literature are emphasized. The laboratory focuses on synthetic reaction development and NMR techniques. Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week.
Corequisite: CHE 322, fourth-year students only

CHE 412
Advanced Topics in Chemistry (W)
Selected topics with recent advances in chemistry are discussed in this seminar course. As part of the requirements, students will prepare and present papers based on recent chemical literature. Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CHE 322 (additional prerequisites depending on the topics offered) or permission of instructor, fourth-year students only

CHE 420
Environmental Chemistry
This course is an advanced treatment of the chemistry of the environment and the chemistry of selected pollutants that are of current interest. Topics include some aspects of aquatic chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, biocycles, soils and minerals, and the effects of chemicals on the environment. The initial laboratory sessions provide a foundation for fieldwork in a project-oriented approach dealing with selected local environmental problems. Field trips to significant chemical use and processing facilities will be taken. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: CHE 322, 323; or Corequisite: CHE 322, or permission of instructor

CHE 470
Advanced Topics in Chemistry Education
This course facilitates the integration of chemical principles with the education curriculum in preparation for the rigors of pedagogy.  Students will thoroughly develop various educational projects that are based on the chemistry core content and are reflective of relevance to, and impact on, other fields.

 

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